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Information Design Patterns

Information Design Patterns
“Threads” are mainly used in online communication systems such as email to describe a group of messages that relate to each other. When a person creates a message to which one or more other persons reply, all these messages form a thread as they relate to each other in respect of a common topic. Hence, a thread is a strictly ordinal structure, meaning that each element has is fixed place in a causal order. Thread arcs were first described as part of a research paper published for the experimental email client Remail. Its main intention is to give the user better control over the messages in his email folders by sorting them according to their affiliations with a specific thread.

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Main Page - Social Patterns Citadel on the Move > Open Data > Convert My Dataset Here you can transform your data into the Citadel format. Using the Citadel format will allow you to use our Application Generation Tool to make apps and make your data useful to other people. Citadel have created this convertor to make is easy for you to change your excel sheets, CSV files or other information into the Citadel format. To use the convertor, you will need a basic level of technical knowledge and to your data to have the following characteristics:

10 Tips for Designing Better Infographics Infographics have been around for ages but in recent years they’ve really come into the spotlight as an almost irresistible way to communicate complex scenarios and information. We can’t help it, when we see a link for an infographic, we almost have to check it out! If you’re at all interested in infographic design, read along as we take a look at some of our favorite examples and discuss some important do’s and don’ts for creating compelling and effective graphics. Create One Strong Focal Point Infographics too often turn into a complicated mess of graphics and text. As a designer, it’s very easy to get carried away and ultimately come away with something that’s more overwhelming than helpful.

Data Visualization and Infographics Resources - Smashing Magazine Advertisement Data visualizations and infographics can make complex datasets easier to understand and comprehend. By creating a graphical represenatation of data and statistics, complicated concepts and information can make more sense in less time. Many visualizations focus on representing a specific set of data or statistical information. Others focus on less-concrete topics, providing a visual representation of abstract concepts. Subcomission on Quaternary Stratigraphy, ICS » Working Groups 15.1.2015 Article in the Berlin daily newspaper Der Tagesspiegel - Anthropozän : Fallout und Plastik markieren das Menschenzeitalter. 16.1.2015 Article in the München (Munich) daily newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung - Am Limit (At the limit). Rocks made of plastic found on Hawaiian beach. Angus Chen reports on a new type of rock cobbled together from plastic, volcanic rock, beach sand, seashells, and corals that has begun forming on the shores of Hawaii on the Science website. Archaeologists say that the 'Anthropocene' is here - but it began long ago. Science 340 19.04.13.

Recovering from information overload - McKinsey Quarterly - Organization - Talent For all the benefits of the information technology and communications revolution, it has a well-known dark side: information overload and its close cousin, attention fragmentation. These scourges hit CEOs and their colleagues in the C-suite particularly hard because senior executives so badly need uninterrupted time to synthesize information from many different sources, reflect on its implications for the organization, apply judgment, make trade-offs, and arrive at good decisions. The importance of reserving chunks of time for reflection, and the difficulty of doing so, have been themes in management writing for decades. Look no further than Peter Drucker’s 1967 classic, The Effective Executive, which emphasized that “most of the tasks of the executive require, for minimum effectiveness, a fairly large quantum of time.”

Review: Designing Data Visualizations on Datavisualization In a recent chat with Jérôme Cukier about the state of visualization related literature, he mentioned Julie Steele and Noah Iliinsky’s new book “Designing Data Visualizations” published by O’Reilly. Jérôme noted that it would be a good primer for people who are already working with data and looking for guidance about making their work more accessible. I thought of another group of people who might find themselves overwhelmed by the amount of choices they have to make while working on visualizations: designers with little knowledge about visual perception and how to apply its’ principles to their work. How to use FF Chartwell Primarily suitable for Adobe Creative Suite, FF Chartwell for print uses OpenType ligatures to transform strings of numbers automatically into charts. The data remains in a text box, allowing for easy updates and styling. It’s really simple to use; you just type a series of numbers like: ‘10+13+37+40’, turn on Stylistic Alternates or Stylistic Set 1 and a graph is automatically created. To help get you started using FF Chartwell we’ve created this video tutorial and here are some simple steps: ONE — Firstly always make sure the letter spacing is set to “0” (zero) TWO — Using the values 0-100, type the values, then use “+” to combine them into one chart.

Welcome to the Virtual Crash Course in Design Thinking Welcome to the d.school’s Virtual Crash Course resource page! We know not everyone can make a trip to the d.school to experience how we teach design thinking. So, we created this online version of one of our most frequently sought after learning tools. 60 Great Visualizations of 2012 2012 has been a great year for all kinds of data visualizations. Data owners are realizing that the best way to communicate the insights buried in their data is by visualizing it. This means there have been tons of great static infographics, motion graphics, and interactive visualizations created this year. We did a roundup of some of the best from each category. 20 Great Infographics of 2012

Turning The Absurdity And Hilarity Of Everyday Life Into Charts A lot of us started highly specific blogs in the late 2000s that have since gone defunct. Too often, a single joke that seemed funny after a few whiskeys got a bit tired after a few months of basking in our own cleverness. An old personal favorite was Nad Shot. It’s a meticulous collection of comic book characters being struck in the testicles. Nad Shot died a horrible, groin-related death in early 2009. Luckily, a much more clever, often more funny blog is still going strong: Indexed. Storytelling with Data Feb. 28, 2013 This is a condensed version of my opening keynote at the Tapestry Conference, which was held yesterday in Nashville’s beautiful Union Station Hotel. I’m writing this from memory so at best it will only be an approximation of what I said. Thanks to all the organizers and attendees for a great event. Update: a video of my talk is now available on the Tapestry blog. Storytelling with data

What Does Big Data Look Like? Visualization Is Key for Humans Image: infocux Technologies/Flickr A simple Google image search on “big data” reveals numerous instances of three dimensional one’s and zero’s, a few explanatory infographics, and even the interface from The Matrix. So what does “big data” look like, within human comprehension? Ask a CEO of a major company what “big data” is, and they’ll likely describe something akin to a blackbox, the flight recorders on airplanes, or draw a cloud on a whiteboard. Ask a data scientist and you might get an explanation of the 4 V’s, itself an attempt at an infographic (but really just a visual collection of facts) and a corresponding explanation. The reason for this is that “big data” is a nebulous term with different meanings, representations, and uses for different organizations.

Why Do We Visualize Quantitative Data? We visualize quantitative data to perform three fundamental tasks in an effort to achieve three essential goals: These three tasks are so fundamental to data visualization, I’ve long used them to define the term, as follows: Data visualization is the use of visual representations to explore, make sense of, and communicate data. But why is it that we must sometimes use graphical displays to perform these tasks rather than other forms of representation? Why not always express values as numbers in tables? Why express them visually rather than audibly?

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