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Braided Rag Rug

Braided Rag Rug
pin your three sewn strips anywhere you can be comfy (you are going to be there for a while! i did mine to my runner on my dining room table) this is the start of your braid. once you get close to the end of your braid you are going to fold over the end of your strip and snip with your a slit. grab the end of your new strip (the end without the slit) and pull through both slits (from behind) this will adjoin your strips and you will be able to continue your braid this is what it should look like, now keep braiding. once you get close to the end of your braid you are going to do the same as you did before and make a slit at the ends of your braided strips and at the beginning of your next strips this time wanted to add color so i took one strip of the honey bun and two of the white strips i cut out. it should now look like this. this will be what you do through out the whole process of braiding your rug. one color in the middle and two whites on the outside. look what you made!

21st Century Window Beads Remember those groovy plastic window beads of the 60's? They were my inspiration for this quick and easy way to get some great new fabrics in your decorating design. Go to the moda fabric website with your own decorating colors in mind and I'm sure you'll find they have just the line you need! One honey bun (I used Sultry by Basic Grey to go in my pink & brown bathroom ) Wood craft beads with large holes First off, a little bit of math is required. Now, before we do the tiny amount of sewing that is required, I will show you a couple ways you can get this done with no sewing at all. Another idea would be to attach each strip with various buttons For this window I sewed the top "sleeve". After a quick measure, I'd flip it over and sew continuously, never cutting the thread from the previous strip. You'll see I applied a piece of low-tack tape to the machine as a temporary sewing guide so that my line stayed straight. I can't tell you how badly I wanted to do fabric covered beads for this.

delightful country cookin: homemade air freshener - StumbleUpon "Don't you get fresh with me, ya hear!" Oh, I love it when adults (especially grandparents) say that to little kids. What does it mean exactly? Today, I'm going to ask you to actually get fresh with me. I digress. I was roaming around on Tasty Kitchen one day when I came across a recipe for homemade air freshener. To make these little beauties, you first need a heat-proof jars (I found mine for $0.99 each at Michael's), food coloring colors of your choice, and essential oil. Into each jar, drop a few drops (I repeat...a few...it doesn't take more than 2 or 3) of food coloring. Now for the fun part. Why salt? Get one cup of water boiling on the stove. Then, pour in the other cup of cold water and the salt, stirring until the salt is dissolved. Quickly pour the hot gelatin mixture in each of your jars, and then use a disposable stick or spoon to stir it into the oil and food coloring. Let these gel overnight, and then voila! To recap, here's the full ingredient list:

Quilted Ironing Board Cover Hi! My name is Jenny and I am so excited to be a designer here at the Bake Shop! This is my first recipe. If your ironing board cover is dull as dishwater, it may be time to spruce it up! I guarantee ironing will be a little more fun when you have something pretty to iron on, like Kate Spain's gorgeous Verna line. 1 Jelly Roll - Verna by Kate Spain 2 Yards of Muslin Luna Batting - Crib Size 3 Yards of 1/2" Wide Ribbon Coordinating Thread * Note: all seams are 1/4" 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. One sassy ironing board cover! Enjoy!

not martha - to make: papier-mache easter eggs - StumbleUpon For Easter I made papier-mache polka dotted eggs. I created them using small water balloons and tissue paper then I filled them with candy and toys and sealed them shut. The egg can hold a surprising amount of candy and the tissue paper seems delicate making for a delightfully heavy and yet fragile object, much like real egg. Also like a real egg you have to break the shell to get at what’s inside. I like things you have to destroy to open. You’ll need: water balloons (they make the egg-iest shape)white tissue paper (one sheet will make about three eggs)colorful tissue paper (one sheet will make many eggs, so you don’t need much)a 3/4 inch hole puncha paint brush you don’t care much aboutliquid laundry starcha sturdy shot glass to hold your egg while you’re working with ita way to hang the balloons to dryenough time to let these dry overnight, and a few hours to let them dry after filling and sealing them (you’ve been warned) Note: I tried a few variations on the starch. Why the loop?

Zip-up Earbuds » LauPre I love to have my music with me everywhere I go, but I hate the tangled mess my wires become when I toss them in my bag or pocket. Last night I whipped up a fun and functional solution by adding a zipper to my earbuds. This project took me around an hour to do (perfect for catching up on some t.v. from hulu.com). The supplies are few; basic sewing supplies, a pair of headphones, and a nice long zipper. I happened to have this crazy purple and gold nike zipper I found thrifting a while ago, it seemed perfect for this project. The first step is to pull the earbuds apart, to separate the wires all the way down to the plug. Next, take one side of your headphones and one side of the zipper tape and start stitching the wire into the tape. It’s as easy as that! Then unzip them to the length I want and put them on so much faster than having to untangle the mess!

DIY Macrame Bracelet Growing up by the beach in Southern California, the ability to knot a macrame bracelet was practically a right of passage. Although those days are long behind us, we’ve never forgotten the ever-so-simple square knot technique. This time, however, we’re replacing hemp and wooden beads for more updated elements like colorful nylon cord and glossy metal charms. Happy knotting! You’ll need: Start by cutting the knotting cord into two 30 inch, two 20 inch and one 10 inch lengths. Center the 30 inch cord under the two middle strands. Pull tightly and slide the knot up to the top. Finish the 2nd half of the square knot by folding the left cord over the middle strands and under the right cord. Pull tightly and repeat the steps – left, right, left, right . . . To finish the knots, thread one of the cords onto a needle and sew up the center of 3-4 knots along the backside. Repeat the same step on the other cord. After sewing up both knotting cords, trim away any excess.

sewing 101: making a pouf Add a burst of color to your room with this crafty pouf! At 17” wide and 10” deep, it’s large enough to serve as floor seating or a foot stool. (And if you have pets, I have a feeling they may want to make this their new favorite spot!) This project is a little challenging to sew, but it’s not too difficult, so if you’re comfortable with the basics of sewing, give it a try. I love the idea of making a set of these poufs in a range of sizes, for a sculptural stack of cushions that will become a room element in their own right. CLICK HERE for the full how-to after the jump! Finished Dimensions: 17” diameter by 10” tall What You’ll Need ¼ yard each 12 coordinating fabrics (I used quilting cottons) 1 yard muslin 3 pounds fiberfill stuffing 2 large buttons (approximately 1 ½”) 2 flat metal washers, slightly smaller than your buttons 12” upholstery needle (get this where upholstery supplies are sold) fishing line sewing thread hand sewing needle sewing machine sharp scissors iron 1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Simply Vintagegirl Blog » Blog Archive » Tutorial: How to Make Lovely Fabric Flowers 29 May 2010 These elegant fabric flowers are very simple to make . . . and only take a few basic supplies. The finished product is delightfully lovely, and at times can look like a real flower! Every flower will turn out differently and that is part of the beauty! If you haven’t used those tea lights in a while, now’s the time! Supplies: · Synthetic Silky Fabric · Scissors · Candle (preferably a tea light) Additional supplies: · Needle and Thread, Glue Dots or Glue Gun · Buttons and/or Beads Directions: 1. Make the largest one’s diameter about half an inch larger than you want the diameter of the flower, as the petals will end up shrinking a bit. 2. You can also cut around the pattern and skip the drawing part, it just might not be as uniform . . . but with these, uniform isn’t necessary. 3. Cut just inside the drawn lines to make a circle out of the fabric. 4. Be very careful (please have adult supervision, this is rather dangerous), as it is very easy to get burnt. 5.

Turquoise 2010: Market/Craft Apron - Sew4Home Handy. Dandy. That's our market/craft apron. Ultra-clever folding allows you to create it using just one main chunk o' fabric plus a little bit of trim. We embellished our apron with a Tattered Flower, using the recent tutorial for making these quick and easy embellishments. Our thanks to our friends at FatQuarterShop for providing the awesome accent fabric. Although I also mention it below, I want to start off these instructions with one caveat (ohhhhh... big word for warning): the folding that creates this apron is super clever, but it also creates some bulky yet narrow seams. Any Sewing Machine (we recommend the Janome MO200 QC)Satin Stitch foot (optional)¼" foot (optional) Squaring the fabric We recommend using a cutting board and rotary cutter for the large rectangle that makes up the body of the apron (white cotton duck in our sample). Waist ties Take the two 30" x 5" tie strips to your ironing board. Scissor loop and key hook fob Find the 9½ x 3" strip of apron body fabric. Binding

Retro Fun: Quilted Mitt Pot Holders Our Retro hot pads not only feature a nostalgic fabric combo, they also have the perfect retro slip-on style. It's a Sew4Home original pattern, and we offer it as a free download. The Simply Sweet fabrics on the two mitts are so bright and cheery, it made me want to slip them on and wear them around the kitchen, just waiting for something hot to pull out of the oven. After awhile, when no one showed up with a tray of cookies, I reluctantly took them off. This project is a bit more advanced than many we offer here at Sew4Home, mainly because of all the layers and the mitered bias binding. Our thanks to Barbara Jones, the designer of the beautiful fabric collection we used: Simply Sweet for Henry Glass & Company. Any Sewing Machine (we recommend the Janome Memory Craft 6600P) Supplies listed are for TWO pot holders NOTE: Our pot holders feature quilting detail in a diamond pattern on the front and a vertical line pattern on the back. Pot Holder #1 Feature Fabric: Layering and quilting

Noel Home: Comfy PJ Pants for the Whole Family - Sew4Home Our thanks to our creative friends at our Signature Sponsor, Janome for sharing this project with us. It was created last year for a special New Sewists Series they put together, and the instructions show you how to make pajama pants without a pattern; simply grab your favorite current pair and use them as a template. We added a jazzy bottom accent cuff to ours so we could mix and match our beautiful Michael Miller Bonnes Amies fabrics. Our thanks to the great folks at Michael Miller Fabrics for providing the Bonnes Amies fabric we used for our four pairs of PJ pants. Any Sewing Machine (we recommend the Janome 3160QDC)Buttonhole foot Amounts are for ONE pair of average adult jammie pants We used Dad's pants as our sample for these instructions. The main pant pattern Locate a pair of pajama pants that fit you or the intended recipient of the new jammie pants. Adapting the traced pattern to create the final cut line and cuff pattern Cut out your fabric pieces with your final patterns Tags:

Quick Tip: Deciphering The Marks on a Measuring Tape - Sew4Home Remember how scary it was to raise your hand in school and ask what you feared would be a "stupid" question? Hopefully we've moved beyond that childhood fear. Questions are great because they lead to answers, and answers are meant to be shared. Today's quick measuring tip came from a question in a visitor's email. Someone needed help figuring out what all those tiny marks are on a standard tape measure. We found that the most common measuring tapes are either divided all the way down to sixteenths... ... or broken down by eighths. There are two measuring charts below: one showing the eighth breakdown and another showing sixteenths. Use the PDF download link below each image to print good quality copies for yourself and a set for a new sewing friend. Sewing Tips & Tricks Related Articles

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