background preloader

What is Blended Learning? — Web Learning @ Penn State

What is Blended Learning? — Web Learning @ Penn State

Teachers Guide to Blended Learning " A blended learning approach combines face to face classroom methods with computer-mediated activities to form an integrated instructional approach. In the past, digital materials have served in a supplementary role, helping to support face to face instruction.For example, a blended approach to a traditional, face to face course might mean that the class meets once per week instead of the usual three-session format. Learning activities that otherwise would have taken place during classroom time can be moved online...." I have chosen for you the above introducation from weblearning to set the floor for the infographic below which has some amazing data and facts about blended learning. read and share .Click to enlarge the image Browse more infographics.

Blended learning Blended learning is a formal education program in which a student learns at least in part through online delivery of content and instruction with some element of student control over time, place, path or pace.[1] While still attending a “brick-and-mortar” school structure, face-to-face classroom methods are combined with computer-mediated activities.[2] Proponents of blending learning cite the opportunity for data collection and customization of instruction and assessment as two major benefits of this approach.[3] Schools with blended learning models may also choose to reallocate resources to boost student achievement outcomes.[4] Terminology[edit] History of the term[edit] The concept of blended learning has been around for a long time, but its terminology was not firmly established until around the beginning of the 21st century. Word usage and context[edit] Blended Learning History[edit] Advantages/disadvantages[edit] Advantages[edit] Disadvantages[edit] Community[edit] See also[edit]

How 21st Century Thinking Is Just Different How 21st Century Thinking Is Just Different by Terry Heick This content is proudly sponsored by The Institute for the Habits of Mind, promoting the development of personal thinking habits in 21st century learners. In an era dominated by constant information and the desire to be social, should the tone of thinking for students be different? After all, this is the world of Google. As a result, the tone of thinking can end up uncertain or whimsical, timid or arrogant, sycophant or idolizing–and so, devoid of connections and interdependence. The nature of social media rests on identity as much as anything else—forcing subjectivity on everything through likes, retweets, shares, and pins. But this takes new habits. Information Abundance There is more information available to any student with a smartphone than an entire empire would have had access to three thousand years ago. New contexts—digital environments that function as humanity-in-your-pocket—demand new approaches and new habits. Persisting.

E-learning Use of technology in education to improve learning and teaching Educational technology (commonly abbreviated as EduTech, or EdTech) is the combined use of computer hardware, software, and educational theory and practice to facilitate learning. Educational technology creates, uses, and manages technological processes and educational resources to help improve user academic performance.[1] The field has been described as a persisting initiative that seeks to bring learners, teacher, and technical means together in an effective way.[2] Definition[edit] Accordingly, there are several discrete aspects to describing the intellectual and technical development of educational technology: Educational technology as the theory and practice of educational approaches to learning.Educational technology as technological tools and media, for instance massive online courses, that assist in the communication of knowledge, and its development and exchange. Related terms[edit] History[edit] Theory[edit] B.F.

9 Characteristics Of 21st Century Learning The label of “21st Century learning” is vague, and is an idea that we here at TeachThought like to take a swing at as often as possible, including: –weighing the magic of technology with its incredible cost and complexity –underscoring the potential for well thought-out instructional design –considering the considerable potential of social media platforms against its apparent divergence from academic learning Some educators seek out the ideal of a 21st century learning environment constantly, while others prefer that we lose the phrase altogether, insisting that learning hasn’t changed, and good learning looks the same whether it’s the 12th or 21st century. At TeachThought, we tend towards the tech-infused model, but do spend time exploring the limits and challenges of technology, the impact of rapid technology change, and carefully considering important questions before diving in head-first. The size of the circles on the map are intended to convey priority. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

paddagogik Hört talas om paddagogik? Nej, här är det varken groddjuret padda eller bilmodellen med samma smeknamn som åsyftas, utan den populära pekplattan Ipad, vars djuriska smeknamn snabbt spreds bland landets teknikintresserade: ”Trots att iPad ännu inte har haft en officiell svensk premiär äger minst 50 000 svenskar redan en padda, enligt olika uppskattningar” (Ipad-bloggen, 29 november 2010). Ibland kallas också pekplattor av andra märken för padda: ”Samsung blir först med padda i Sverige” (IDG.se, 25 november 2010). I paddans kölvatten myntades så nyordet paddagogik, som förstås är en lek med orden pegagogik och padda. Det blir allt vanligare att pekplattan, kanske i synnerhet Ipad, används som pedagogiskt redskap i förskolan. 12 Principles Of Mobile Learning 12 Principles Of Mobile Learning by Terry Heick Ed note: This post has been updated and republished from a 2012 post Mobile Learning is about self-actuated personalization. As learning practices and technology tools change, mobile learning itself will continue to evolve. For 2016, the focus is on a variety of challenges, from how learners access content to how the idea of a “curriculum” is defined. It is only within these communities that the native context of each learner can be fully understood. 1. A mobile learning environment is about access to content, peers, experts, portfolio artifacts, credible sources, and previous thinking on relevant topics. 2. As mobile learning is a blend of the digital and physical, diverse metrics (i.e., measures) of understanding and “performance of knowledge” will be available. 3. The cloud is the enabler of “smart” mobility. 4. Transparency is the natural byproduct of connectivity, mobility, and collaboration. 5. 6. 7. 8. With mobility comes diversity. 9.

Virtual world The user accesses a computer-simulated world which presents perceptual stimuli to the user, who in turn can manipulate elements of the modeled world and thus experience a degree of telepresence.[6] Such modeled worlds and their rules may draw from the reality or fantasy worlds. Example rules are gravity, topography, locomotion, real-time actions, and communication. Communication between users can range from text, graphical icons, visual gesture, sound, and rarely, forms using touch, voice command, and balance senses. Virtual worlds are not limited to games but, depending on the degree of immediacy presented, can encompass computer conferencing and text based chatrooms. Sometimes, emoticons or 'smilies' are available to show feeling or facial expression. Emoticons often have a keyboard shortcut.[9] Edward Castronova is an economist who has argued that "synthetic worlds" is a better term for these cyberspaces, but this term has not been widely adopted. History[edit] Economy[edit]

Related: