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Visualizing Algorithms

Visualizing Algorithms
The power of the unaided mind is highly overrated… The real powers come from devising external aids that enhance cognitive abilities. —Donald Norman Algorithms are a fascinating use case for visualization. To visualize an algorithm, we don’t merely fit data to a chart; there is no primary dataset. Instead there are logical rules that describe behavior. This may be why algorithm visualizations are so unusual, as designers experiment with novel forms to better communicate. But algorithms are also a reminder that visualization is more than a tool for finding patterns in data. #Sampling Before I can explain the first algorithm, I first need to explain the problem it addresses. Light — electromagnetic radiation — the light emanating from this screen, traveling through the air, focused by your lens and projected onto the retina — is a continuous signal. This reduction process is called sampling, and it is essential to vision. Sampling is made difficult by competing goals. Here’s how it works:

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Philosophy of mathematics - Wikipedia The terms philosophy of mathematics and mathematical philosophy are frequently used interchangeably.[1] The latter, however, may be used to refer to several other areas of study. One refers to a project of formalizing a philosophical subject matter, say, aesthetics, ethics, logic, metaphysics, or theology, in a purportedly more exact and rigorous form, as for example the labors of scholastic theologians, or the systematic aims of Leibniz and Spinoza. Another refers to the working philosophy of an individual practitioner or a like-minded community of practicing mathematicians. Additionally, some understand the term "mathematical philosophy" to be an allusion to the approach to the foundations of mathematics taken by Bertrand Russell in his books The Principles of Mathematics and Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy.

Did Google Just Read the Text on My Image and Can This Affect My Rankings? It is pretty much agreed that Google can and probably does read metadata embedded in photos, though whether that influences SEO in any way is still disputed. In fact, the conventional wisdom seems to be that search engines do not take into account photo-embedded text (assuming they can read it at all) and that the practice of embedding text in photos is generally a bad idea for a series of other non-SEO reasons (mostly having to do with accessibility of the information for the user). At the same time, the question if text embedded in photos “can’t be read by search engines” remains. And as Google is making increasingly significant efforts in the direction of image recognition technology, having recently acquired DeepMind, it’s hard to believe that photo-embedded text is not an area of interest. Why Should I Care About Images & SEO?

Why blurring sensitive information is a bad idea Undoubtedly you have all seen photographs of people on TV and online who have been blurred to hide faces. For example, here's one of Bill Gates: Adapted from the Wikimedia Commons For the most part this is all fine with peoples' faces as there isn't a convenient way to reverse the blur back into a photo so detailed that you can recognise the photo. So that's good if that is what you intended. However, many people also resort to blurring sensitive numbers and text.

Temperature Anomalies Enigma.io is a search engine and API for public data. We find certain datasets to be especially powerful because the underlying phenomena they capture have such a fundamental impact on our world. Climate affects our agricultural production, the price of gasoline, the livelihood of small businesses or temporary farm workers, and ultimately the sustainability of our species on this planet. On March 31st, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a report reaffirming the scientific community's consensus that the "worst is yet to come." The report projects the effects of climate change on society in the next decades, and questions for instance, the sustainability of our food supply. The White House also recently declared that "every citizen will be affected by climate change," and issued call to action for the open exploration of climate data.

8 Ways to Use Email Alerts to Boost SEO Link building is nowhere near dead, and some of the best link opportunities can be discovered by setting up email alerts for various things that are published on the web. In today's Whiteboard Friday, Rand runs through eight specific types of alerts that you can implement today for improved SEO. Howdy Moz fans, and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. 50+ Data Science, Machine Learning Cheat Sheets, updated This post updates a previous very popular post 50+ Data Science, Machine Learning Cheat Sheets by Bhavya Geethika. If we missed some popular cheat sheets, add them in the comments below. Cheatsheets on Python, R and Numpy, Scipy, Pandas Data science is a multi-disciplinary field.

Alex Payne — Thoughts On Five Years of Emerging Languages This Wednesday will mark five years of Emerging Languages, the showcase for new programming languages that I dreamed up back in 2009. As we approach half a decade and well over fifty total presentations, I’ve been reflecting on where the event has been and how the language landscape has changed since we began. Our first year, 2010, was a big one. Several of the languages presented that year have since broken out into the mainstream, particularly Clojure, Go, and CoffeeScript.

The mathematically proven winning strategy for 14 of the most popular games (istock) From Risk to tic-tac-toe, popular games involve tons of strategic decisions, probability and math. So one happy consequence of being a data nerd is that you may have an advantage at something even non-data nerds understand: winning. So how do you win (almost) every game in existence, do you ask? Here are 20 data visualizations that offer lots of insight into the most popular games in America, including chess, Connect Four, Monopoly, Pac-Man, "Wheel of Fortune" and much more. Battleship | Chess 1 | Chess 2 | Chess 3 | A coin toss | Connect Four | Diplomacy | "Jeopardy!"

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