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English verb Conjugation: modal verbs, irregular verbs, present, future, participle

English verb Conjugation: modal verbs, irregular verbs, present, future, participle
Related:  Grammar

FayHejab Present simple and present continuous Examples I play tennis every Sunday. I’m playing hockey now. She eats fruit every day. She’s eating an apple now. Remember! We use the present simple to talk about routines – what you do every day or every week. Be careful! For the present simple, add ‘s’ or ‘es’ for he/she/it. We say... I wake up every morning at 7:00. Logos Conjugator English Dictionary online LEXILOGOS >> •Oxford (compact) English dictionary • Oxford (advanced learners) English dictionary & American English • Macmillan: English dictionary • Chambers: English dictionary • Collins: English dictionary • Cambridge (advanced learner's dictionary) • Longman: English dictionary • Merriam-Webster (American) meaning , etymology, pronunciation (+ audio) & thesaurus • Learner's dictionary • Visual dictionary by topics • American Dictionary of the English Language by Noah Webster, 1828 edition • The Century Dictionary (American, 1881) dictionary & encyclopedia: 500 000 meanings • Etymonline: etymological dictionary • Word info: etymology of English words derived from Latin and Greek words • Roget's Thesaurus: synonyms & broaders • Hyperdic: synonyms & broaders, meanings • Visuwords: synonyms (graphical dictionary) • Dictionary.com: American dictionaries: Random House, American Heritage... • Wordnik: American dictionaries: American Heritage, Century... & etymology, examples • rhyming dictionary

PsyBlog: Why We do Dumb or Irrational Things: 10 Brilliant Social Psychology Studies Ten of the most influential social psychology experiments. “I have been primarily interested in how and why ordinary people do unusual things, things that seem alien to their natures.Why do good people sometimes act evil?Why do smart people sometimes do dumb or irrational things?” –Philip Zimbardo Like eminent social psychologist Professor Philip Zimbardo (author of The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil), I’m also obsessed with why we do dumb or irrational things. The answer quite often is because of other people – something social psychologists have comprehensively shown. Over the past few months I’ve been describing 10 of the most influential social psychology experiments. Each one tells a unique, insightful story relevant to all our lives, every day. 1. The ‘halo effect’ is a classic social psychology experiment. » Read on about the halo effect -» 2. » Read on about cognitive dissonance -» 3. » Read on about Sherif’s Robbers Cave experiment -» 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

17 cultural reasons why this European never wants to live in America Warning: If you are pissed off easily, don’t read this post. Although plenty of (American) commenters agree with me, I’m also getting a flood of angry comments and hatemail, but this is my (as always) frank and honest non-watered-down opinion, take it or leave it! Read on to the conclusion to see my positive thoughts about Americans before you conclude that this is Anti-American propaganda. If you are coming here from Stumbleupon or Facebook, please share this post with your friends if you enjoy it :). Normally, after I spend considerable time in a country/city, I like to summarise my cultural experience there and tend to put a positive spin on it, as I did with Germany, Amsterdam, Brazil, and even Paris, which was actually a negative experience for me. This time I’m not doing that. This post is my rant about America because of all the places I’ve been, the people who always complain the most about the local country are travelling Americans. 1. 2. I really hate the word awesome. 3. 4. 5.

Grammar Auction: Turn grammar review into a game – tekhnologic This is not a new activity and you can find several descriptions of a grammar auction online. You may find these descriptions Grammar Auctions useful: Clare Lavery describes a Grammar Auction for teachingenglish.org.uk. Bjorn Norstrom describes a Grammar Auction for Dave’s ESL café’s idea cookbook. Alex Case suggests some variations on Grammar Auctions for TEFL.net. The other day, I was trying to find some inspiration because I was having a difficult time thinking of something to create for the website. Watch this video for an introduction to the template and instructions on how to edit it. After you have watched the video, continue reading to download the template and for a more detailed description about using it in the classroom. Watch the tutorial video to see how to edit and use the Grammar Auction template.Video run-time is 3 minutes and 26 seconds. Click on the image or the link below to download the template. Download the Grammar Auction template. Click on a ‘hammer’ button. “Wow!

Mission Europe Urban Dictionary, December 30: brickberry The 12 Kinds of Ads In 1978, Donald Gunn was a creative director for the advertising agency Leo Burnett. Though his position implied expertise, Gunn felt he was often just throwing darts—relying on inspiration and luck (instead of proven formulas) to make great ads. So, he decided to inject some analytical rigor into the process: He took a yearlong sabbatical, studied the best TV ads he could find, and looked for elemental patterns. After much research, Gunn determined that nearly all good ads fall into one of 12 categories—or "master formats," in his words. At last year's Clio Awards, I saw Gunn give a lecture about these formats (using ads mostly from the '70s and '80s as examples), and I was fascinated by his theory. I soon found myself categorizing every ad I saw on TV. This slide show presents some recent ads exemplifying each of Gunn's 12 basic categories. Click here for a slide show on Gunn's 12 master formats.

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