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Scotland

Scotland
Scotland (/ˈskɒt.lənd/; Scots: [ˈskɔt.lənd]; Scottish Gaelic: Alba [ˈal̪ˠapə] ( Edinburgh, the country's capital and second-largest city, was the hub of the Scottish Enlightenment of the 18th century, which transformed Scotland into one of the commercial, intellectual, and industrial powerhouses of Europe. Glasgow, Scotland's largest city,[17] was once one of the world's leading industrial cities and now lies at the centre of the Greater Glasgow conurbation. Scottish waters consist of a large sector of the North Atlantic and the North Sea,[18] containing the largest oil reserves in the European Union. This has given Aberdeen, the third-largest city in Scotland, the title of Europe's oil capital.[19] The Kingdom of Scotland emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages and continued to exist until 1707. Scotland is a member nation of the British–Irish Council,[29] and the British–Irish Parliamentary Assembly. Etymology History Early history Roman influence Medieval period

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotland

Related:  Rapport de stage sur L'EcosseResearch: Scotland

Scottish Qualifications Certificate The Scottish Qualifications Certificate (SQC) is the successor to the Scottish Certificate of Education and the Record of Education and Training, and is the main educational qualification awarded to students in secondary, further, and vocational education. The SQC is awarded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority. It forms part of the wider array of qualifications available in the Scottish education system, including Scottish Vocational Qualifications, Higher National Certificates and Higher National Diplomas.

Scottish Scottish usually refers to something of, from, or related to Scotland, including: Hailes (ball game) Hailes or clacken is a Scottish ball game which dates to the 18th century and achieved its widest popularity in the nineteenth. It has now virtually died out, replaced by football, except at the Edinburgh Academy, where an exhibition match is played annually. The game is similar to shinty but played with wooden bats known as clackens. John Hugh Lockhart at Abbotsford with clacken and ball The picture on the right, which appeared as the frontispiece to an 1829 edition of Scott's Tales of a Grandfather shows Scott's grandson, John Hugh Lockhart with a clacken and ball at Abbotsford. This is probably the oldest representation of the clacken.

Ireland Ireland ( Politically, Ireland is divided between the Republic of Ireland (officially also named Ireland), which covers five-sixths of the island, and Northern Ireland, a part of the United Kingdom, which covers the remaining area and is located in the northeast of the island. In 2011 the population of Ireland was about 6.4 million, ranking it the second-most populous island in Europe after Great Britain. Just under 4.6 million live in the Republic of Ireland and just over 1.8 million live in Northern Ireland.[7] The island's geography comprises relatively low-lying mountains surrounding a central plain, with several navigable rivers extending inland.

Ireland Ireland (locally: /ˈɑːrlənd/; RP: /ˈaɪələnd/; GA: i/ˈaɪərlənd/; Irish: Éire [ˈeːɾʲə] ( Politically, Ireland is divided between the Republic of Ireland, which covers five-sixths of the island, and Northern Ireland, a part of the United Kingdom, which covers the remaining area and is located in the north-east of the island.

Education in Scotland Traditionally, the Scottish system at secondary school level has emphasised breadth across a range of subjects, while the English, Welsh and Northern Irish systems have emphasised greater depth of education over a smaller range of subjects. State schools are owned and operated by the local authorities which act as Education Authorities, and the compulsory phase is divided into primary school and secondary school (often called high school). Schools are supported in delivering learning and teaching by Education Scotland (formerly Learning and Teaching Scotland). There are also private schools across the country, although the distribution is uneven with such schools in 22 of the 32 Local Authority areas. At September 2011 the total pupil population in Scotland was 702,104, of which 31,425 pupils, or 4.5%, were being educated in independent schools.[4]

Scottish people This article is about the Scottish people as an ethnic group. For residents or nationals of Scotland, see Demographics of Scotland. There are people of Scottish descent in many countries other than Scotland. Emigration, influenced by factors such as the Highland and Lowland Clearances, Scottish participation in the British Empire, and latterly industrial decline and unemployment, resulted in Scottish people being found throughout the world. Kilt One of the earliest depictions of the kilt is this German print showing Highlanders in about 1630 The kilt is a knee-length garment with pleats at the rear, originating in the traditional dress of men and boys in the Scottish Highlands of the 16th century. Since the 19th century it has become associated with the wider culture of Scotland in general, or with Celtic (and more specifically Gaelic) heritage even more broadly. It is most often made of woollen cloth in a tartan pattern.

England England i/ˈɪŋɡlənd/ is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[3][4][5] It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west. The Irish Sea lies northwest of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. Mexico Mexico ( i/ˈmɛksɨkoʊ/; Spanish: México [ˈmexiko] ( )), officially the United Mexican States (Spanish: Estados Unidos Mexicanos ),[9][10][11][12] is a federal republic in North America. It is bordered on the north by the United States of America; on the south and west by the Pacific Ocean; on the southeast by Guatemala, Belize, and the Caribbean Sea; and on the east by the Gulf of Mexico.[13] Covering almost two million square kilometres (over 760,000 sq mi),[12] Mexico is the fifth largest country in the Americas by total area and the 13th largest independent nation in the world.

Standard Grade Standard Grades (Scottish Gaelic: Ìre Choitcheann) are Scotland's educational qualifications for students aged around 14 to 16 years, which are due to be fully replaced when Scottish Qualifications Authority's Higher Still system becomes the main qualifications as part of the major shake up of Scotland's education system as part of Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework overhaul. Scottish Standard Grades roughly equal the English General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) Examinations in terms of level subject content and cognitive difficulty.[1] History[edit]

Crail Coordinates: Crail ( listen ); Scottish Gaelic: Cathair Aile) is a former royal burgh in the East Neuk of Fife, Scotland. History[edit] Tartan Tartan is a pattern consisting of criss-crossed horizontal and vertical bands in multiple colours. Tartans originated in woven wool, but now they are made in many other materials. Tartan is particularly associated with Scotland. Scottish kilts almost always have tartan patterns. Tartan is often called plaid in North America, but in Scotland, a plaid is a tartan cloth slung over the shoulder as a kilt accessory, or a plain ordinary blanket such as one would have on a bed.

Wales Wales ( i/ˈweɪlz/; Welsh: Cymru [ˈkəm.rɨ]) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and the island of Great Britain,[6] bordered by England to its east, the Irish Sea to its north and west, and the Bristol Channel to its south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous, with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon (Yr Wyddfa), its highest summit. The country lies within the north temperate zone and has a changeable, maritime climate.

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