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Are We Ready For the Coming 'Age of Abundance?' - Dr. Michio Kaku (Full

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This glass sphere might revolutionize solar power on Earth German architect André Broessel, of Rawlemon, has looked into his crystal ball and seen the future of renewable energy. In this case it’s a spherical sun-tracking solar energy-generating globe — essentially a giant glass marble on a robotic steel frame. But this marble is no toy. It concentrates both sunlight and moonlight up to 10,000 times — making its solar harvesting capabilities 35 percent more efficient than conventional dual-axis photovoltaic designs. André Broessel was a finalist in the World Technology Network Award 2013 with the globe’s design and afterward produced this latest version, called Betaray, which can concentrate diffuse light such as that from a cloudy day. André Broessel’s latest invention looks like something out of a superhero movie. In reality, though, it’s a stand-alone solar energy generator. But Broessel’s invention may be more than just aesthetically pleasing. “We can squeeze more juice out of the sun,” Broessel says. Source: NewsDiscovery

This solar panel printer can make 33 feet of solar cells per minute Whatever oil and gas true believers want to think, the world is doing this solar power thing. It’s getting cheaper and cheaper to make solar panels, and the panels are getting more and more effective. For example: A team in Australia just built a gigantic printer that spits out solar cells at a rate, Gizmodo reports, of about 33 feet every minute. It’s not even particularly complicated technology, according to the researchers. Gizmodo writes: [The printer system] utilizes only existing printer technology to embed polymer solar cells (also known as organic or plastic solar cells) in thin sheets of plastic or steel at a rate of ten meters per minute. This particular type of cell isn’t the most efficient, but it’s the type that lends itself to uses where you need a little flexibility — solar windows, bags, or tents, for instances.

TOP 10 IMPOSSIBLE INVENTIONS THAT WORK « Revolutionizing Awareness Searl Effects Generator by Jeane Manning When Leonardo da Vinci sketched out an impossible invention, fifteenth-century scholars probably put him down. Forget it, Leon. If machines could fly, we’d know about it. Throughout history, experts tell innovators that their inventions are impossible. Perhaps in the 21st century the following inventions will be standard science, and a history student may wonder why 20th-century pundits disregarded them. This class of inventions could wipe out oil crises and help solve environmental problems. Forget the Rube Goldberg mechanical perpetual motion contraptions; they had to stop eventually. Inventors give various names to their space-energy converters. A spiritual commune in Switzerland had a tabletop free energy device running in greenhouses for years, but members feared that outsiders would turn the technology into weaponry. It may have been done before Tesla’s time. The garage inventors come from many backgrounds. 8.

8 math talks to blow your mind Mathematics gets down to work in these talks, breathing life and logic into everyday problems. Prepare for math puzzlers both solved and unsolvable, and even some still waiting for solutions. Ron Eglash: The fractals at the heart of African designs When Ron Eglash first saw an aerial photo of an African village, he couldn’t rest until he knew — were the fractals in the layout of the village a coincidence, or were the forces of mathematics and culture colliding in unexpected ways? Here, he tells of his travels around the continent in search of an answer. How big is infinity? Arthur Benjamin does “Mathemagic” A whole team of calculators is no match for Arthur Benjamin, as he does astounding mental math in the blink of an eye. Scott Rickard: The beautiful math behind the ugliest music What makes a piece of music beautiful? Benoit Mandelbrot: Fractals and the art of roughness The world is based on roughness, explains legendary mathematician Benoit Mandelbrot.

Ion Power Group LLC Introduction to Global Energy Transmission Project aka Global Energy Transmission As of today, at least 40% of the world’s electric power still comes from coal, despite scientific and technical achievements that have been made so far. So, coal yet plays a very important role in modern life. Many countries all over the world realize that they are not able to give up the use of coal. Now this one really sounds crazy. Such mainstream use of coal leads to huge emissions of СО2 around the globe. source: The Renewable Energy Problem The simplest and easiest solution would be to set a veto on the operation of all 7000 coal-steam plants currently functioning worldwide. The problem is that energy generation strongly depends on the time of day and, therefore, is very unsteady (PV means Photovoltaic): Such tendency in energy generation results in the following: transmitting mains experience huge peak loads for which they are principally not intended. On 4 November 2006, a German 380 kV line had to be temporarily disconnected.

A smart-object recognition algorithm that doesn’t need humans (Credit: BYU Photo) BYU engineer Dah-Jye Lee has created an algorithm that can accurately identify objects in images or video sequences — without human calibration. “In most cases, people are in charge of deciding what features to focus on and they then write the algorithm based off that,” said Lee, a professor of electrical and computer engineering. “With our algorithm, we give it a set of images and let the computer decide which features are important.” Humans need not apply Not only is Lee’s genetic algorithm able to set its own parameters, but it also doesn’t need to be reset each time a new object is to be recognized — it learns them on its own. Lee likens the idea to teaching a child the difference between dogs and cats. Comparison with other object-recognition algorithms In a study published in the December issue of academic journal Pattern Recognition, Lee and his students demonstrate both the independent ability and accuracy of their “ECO features” genetic algorithm.

Welcome, Robot Overlords. Please Don't Fire Us? Smart machines probably won't kill us all—but they'll definitely take our jobs, and sooner than you think. Illustrations by Roberto Parada This is a story about the future. Not the unhappy future, the one where climate change turns the planet into a cinder or we all die in a global nuclear war. This is the happy version. It's the one where computers keep getting smarter and smarter, and clever engineers keep building better and better robots. The result is paradise. Maybe you think I'm pulling your leg here. But they're not. What do we do over the next few decades as robots become steadily more capable and steadily begin taking away all our jobs? Suppose it's 1940 and Lake Michigan has (somehow) been emptied. By 1950, you have added around a gallon of water. At this point it's been 30 years, and even though 16,000 gallons is a fair amount of water, it's nothing compared to the size of Lake Michigan. So let's skip all the way ahead to 2000. But wait. And that's exactly where we are.

Sci-Fi-Nano-Future-Blog By examining decades’ worth of stored bacteria samples, researchers have determined how a benign organism evolved into a deadly pathogen that causes necrotizing fasciitis, commonly known as flesh-eating bacteria disease. Using genetic sequences from more than 3,600 strains of bacteria, scientists were able to see that it took only four steps to create the unusual microbe that spreads rapidly and destroys the body’s soft tissue. Their report was published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Necrotizing fasciitis is caused by several types of bacteria, most commonly group A Streptococcus. "The third event was a mutation of a single letter of the genome of the organism to create an even more virulent form," said the study’s main author, James Musser, director of the Center for Molecular and Translational Human Infectious Diseases Research at the Houston Methodist Research Institute in Texas. A Long Search for Answers text and photo from Nat Geo

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