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Robert Scoble On Online Curation

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WMn-cJHzF8A

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Librarians Blogging - Library 2.0 I believe in the power of the people. Not in a political way, because I'm not after your vote for anything. But in a social way that is changing how we find information and how marketers communicate with their customers. Technology is an enabler, but the real shift is in people collaborating and sharing an authentic voice. It is why I have written about human filtered search in the past instead of algorithms. It is also why I am writing a book dedicated to exploring the idea of injecting more personality into marketing.

Online Content Curation: The Key To Building Visibility, Authority And Value As you are increasingly submerged by an endless flood of information, online content curators may provide a new, valuable service to anyone looking for quality information online: a personalized, qualified selection of the best and most relevant content and resources on a very specific topic or theme. Curated in real-time. When I first wrote about this, six years ago, I called this type of work newsmastering and newsradars, but now that the real-time element has come into play, as much as social media, video, Twitter and other new content sources, the original idea of what a newsmaster / content curator is and what tools and features are really needed has certainly started to change. Photo credit: Erkin Sahin

The Baloney Detection Kit: Carl Sagan’s Rules for Bullshit-Busting and Critical Thinking By Maria Popova Carl Sagan was many things — a cosmic sage, voracious reader, hopeless romantic, and brilliant philosopher. But above all, he endures as our era’s greatest patron saint of reason and common sense, a master of the vital balance between skepticism and openness. In The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark (public library) — the same indispensable volume that gave us Sagan’s timeless meditation on science and spirituality, published mere months before his death in 1996 — Sagan shares his secret to upholding the rites of reason, even in the face of society’s most shameless untruths and outrageous propaganda. Through their training, scientists are equipped with what Sagan calls a “baloney detection kit” — a set of cognitive tools and techniques that fortify the mind against penetration by falsehoods: The kit is brought out as a matter of course whenever new ideas are offered for consideration.

The Busy Person's Guide to Content Curation : A 3-Step Process 841 Flares Filament.io 841 Flares × Museums curate works of art. We digital marketers curate blog posts. Though our link shares may not be artistic contributions, the idea of curation is at least the same at museums and online: We’re all seeking only the best material to pass along to our patrons, customers, fans, or followers. Finding and sharing exquisite content has never had more value than it does today. People love being told what’s good to read or essential to see. Web Application 1 As the web becomes more and more inundated with blogs, videos, tweets, status updates, news, articles, and countless other forms of content, “information overload” is something we all seem to suffer. It is becoming more difficult to weed through all the “stuff” out there and pluck out the best, most share-worthy tidbits of information, especially if your topic is niche. Let’s face it, Google definitely has its shortcomings when it comes to content curation and the more it tries to cater to all audiences, the less useful it becomes. The demand for timely, relevant content that is specific to our unique interests and perspectives has given rise to a new generation of tools that aim to help individuals and companies curate content from the web and deliver it in a meaningful way. These new tools range from simple, application-specific types such as social media aggregators and discovery engines, to more complex, full-blown publishing solutions for organizations.

Real-Time News Curation, Newsmastering And Newsradars - The Complete Guide Part 1: Why We Need It The time it takes to follow and go through multiple web sites and blogs takes tangible time, and since most sources publish or give coverage to more than one topic, one gets to browse and scan through lots of useless content just for the sake of finding what is relevant to his specific interest. Even in the case of power-users utilizing RSS feed readers, aggregators and filters, the amount of junk we have to sift through daily is nothing but impressive, so much so, that those who have enough time and skills to pick the gems from that ocean of tweets, social media posts and blog posts, enjoy a fast increasing reputation and visibility online. Photo credit: dsharpie and franckreporter mashed up by Robin Good "What we need to get much better at is scaling that system so you don't have to pay attention to everything, but you don't miss the stuff you care about..."

Content Curation: Copyright, Ethics & Fair Use >>Click here to download the eBook. The most common and fundamental questions that come up whenever I talk about content curation (especially in the context of content marketing) is how “How can you use other people’s content? How does that work with copyright, fair use and more generally ethics?” This is a topic that I have covered before in two earlier blog posts, but since it’s central to curation, it is worth revisiting once again. Startup of the Week: Rormix Rormix is a music video platform that aims to support independent artists. The website -- and accompanying iOS and Android apps -- only publishes curated content from unsigned musicians and future profits from advertising will be split with them. The point? To help the public tune out the tumult of cute animal videos crammed in between the world's best-selling artists on YouTube, to hopefully find something new. After launching in spring of this year, Rormix has gone on to be downloaded 100,000 times in 180 countries, with 40,000 monthly active users viewing 5,000 music videos.

Real-Time News Curation - The Complete Guide Part 2: Aggregation Is Not Curation We are no longer just consumers of content, we have become curators of it too. In Part 1 of this Guide I have introduced why we really need real-time news curation and what is the basic idea behind it (Part 1 - Real-Time News Curation, Newsmastering And Newsradars - The Complete Guide Part 1: Why We Need It). In Part 2 I want to continue illustrating what "real-time news curation" is all about, and more specifically why it differs from automatic aggregation, and why you really need a human being to do it. As I see it: "Aggregation is automated, curation is manual." Photo credit: Creativaimage

How Nonprofits Get Significant Value from Content Curation Harold Jarche (Click for Original Article) On December 17 at 6:30 pm, I am facilitating a discussion and presenting at one of Scoop.It’s “Lean Content” events in San Francisco. The topic is “The Unanticipated Benefits of Content Curation for Nonprofits.” Content curation is sifting through information on the web and organizing, filtering and making sense of it and sharing the very best content with your network. Rather than another potential recipe for information overload, content curation can be a method for self-directed learning that builds your expertise while enhancing your organization’s brand and content strategy. Content curation can empower us to learn more and use that knowledge to get deeper impact for our nonprofit’s programs.

A Comprehensive Guide to Content Curation Depending on your point of view, content on the internet can be a vast collection of treasures, a cesspool swimming in filth, or a big pile of gold specks mixed in with an even bigger pile of dirt. My guess is that most people lean towards the last one, giving rise to content curation, the process of finding the gold among the dirt, as a very popular online activity. At its most basic, content curation is the process of finding, organizing, and presenting content from the flood of information and media that inundate the web by the second.

Curated Content Delivery Formats: Beyond News Portals and Magazines The new frontiers for content curation tools and services are in a) providing advanced collaborative ("social)" features and in b) introducing and integrating new and effective, highly visual, delivery formats. Photo credit: CaraMaria Curating content and news is not just about the selection, editing and contextualization of stories about a specific topic or theme, but it is increasingly about how these information items are (collaboratively) gathered, organized, grouped, displayed and in which ways they can be accessed and browsed by those interested in them.

Behind the Curator's Code The Curator's Code was recently unveiled. The system aims to codify the "attribution of discovery in curation as a currency of the information economy", which would honour the "creative and intellectual labor of information discovery by making attribution consistent and codified, celebrating authors and creators, and also respecting those who discover and amplify their work". In pure practical terms, the scheme provides new symbols for 'via' and 'hat tip', which link back to the Curator's Code website, although the site notes these are optional and its main aim is to encourage more attribution across the web.

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