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The Busy Person’s Lies

The Busy Person’s Lies
HOW’S life? Oh, busy. So goes the mindless modern conversation — a constant assertion of the scarcity of time. A December Gallup poll found that 61 percent of working Americans said they did not have enough time to do the things they wanted to do. Some of us feel this more acutely than others: A 2015 Pew Research Center survey found that 9 in 10 working mothers said they felt rushed all or some of the time. In an attempt to understand this frenzy, I spent the past 12 months studying my own time during what might turn out to be the busiest year of my life. I had another baby in January 2015, bringing my total to four under the age of 8. So I logged on a spreadsheet in half-hour blocks every one of the 8,784 hours that make up a leap year. After hitting hour 8,784 at 5 a.m. on April 20, I started analyzing my logs and adding up the categories. These data points exist, but there was plenty of evidence of a calmer life. This wasn’t my first time analyzing time logs.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/15/opinion/sunday/the-busy-persons-lies.html

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You probably know to ask yourself, “What do I want?” Here’s a way better question — Quartz Everybody wants what feels good. Everyone wants to live a carefree, happy and easy life, to fall in love and have amazing sex and relationships, to look perfect and make money and be popular and well-respected and admired and a total baller to the point that people part like the Red Sea when you walk into the room. Everyone would like that — it’s easy to like that. If I ask you, “What do you want out of life?” and you say something like, “I want to be happy and have a great family and a job I like,” it’s so ubiquitous that it doesn’t even mean anything. A more interesting question, a question that perhaps you’ve never considered before, is what pain do you want in your life?

Motivation is Overvalued. Environment Often Matters More. It can be tempting to blame failure on a lack of willpower or a scarcity of talent, and to attribute success to hard work, effort, and grit. To be sure, those things matter. What is interesting, however, is that if you examine how human behavior has been shaped over time, you discover that motivation (and even talent) is often overvalued. In many cases, the environment matters more. Let me share an example that surprised me when I first learned of it. The Shape of Human Behavior

A Formula to Stop You from Overcommitting Your Time When I dive into time coaching clients’ schedules, I consistently discover that people misdiagnose themselves as having a “productivity” problem when, in fact, their bigger issue is an overcommitment problem. When they have committed to more external projects and personal goals and obligations than they have hours for in the day, they feel the massive weight of time debt. One of my coaching clients suffered from a huge amount of false guilt until he realized he had the unrealistic expectation that he could fit 160 hours of tasks into a 40-hour workweek. Effective time investment begins with accepting the reality that time is a finite resource.

How to Convince Someone When Facts Fail Have you ever noticed that when you present people with facts that are contrary to their deepest held beliefs they always change their minds? Me neither. In fact, people seem to double down on their beliefs in the teeth of overwhelming evidence against them. The reason is related to the worldview perceived to be under threat by the conflicting data. Creationists, for example, dispute the evidence for evolution in fossils and DNA because they are concerned about secular forces encroaching on religious faith.

Clocks Make Workers Less Creative I love the phrase "It's 5 o'clock somewhere." For most people, the saying conjures up an image of an over-eager happy-hour partaker, but it's always made me think of someone, somewhere, leaving their office after a hard day's work. The length of the workday, for many workers, is defined by time; they leave when the clock tells them they're done. These days, the time is everywhere: not just on clocks or watches, but on phones, computers, stamped on every email. And that may be a bad thing, particularly at work. New research shows that clock-based work schedules hinder morale and creativity.

"If You Don't Have Time, It's Because You're Afraid" Source: PicJumbo. One of the most common excuses for not improving a habit is arguing, “I don’t have time”. This is a lie. Why Very Smart People Are Happiest Alone In a just-published study about how our ancestral needs impact our modern feelings, researchers uncovered something that will surprise few among the highly intelligent. While most people are happier when they’re surrounded by friends, smart people are happier when they’re not. The researchers, Norman P. Li and Satoshi Kanazawa, of the Singapore Management University, Singapore and the London School of Economics and Political Science, UK, respectively, were investigating the “savannah theory” of happiness.

This Is How To Be Productive: 5 New Secrets Proven By Research Want to know how to be productive? Create goals, make a plan and execute. We all know this is a good idea… and it never, ever seems to work. How a Themed Schedule Can Help You Stay on Task I’m a writer, a productivity coach and a speaker. Since I work from home, I have work-related activities that may carry over into my home life if I’m not careful. I’m also a stay-at-home parent who has responsibilities during the week that can bleed over into my work life … if I’m not careful. So what keeps me on the right tasks at the right times more often than not? It wasn’t something that happened overnight. It took discipline — discipline that was forged over a period of time in large part because of a framework I put in place that fostered it and allowed it to flourish.

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