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Best Privacy Tools

Best Privacy Tools
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64 Things Every Geek Should Know « Caintech.co.uk If you consider yourself a geek, or aspire to the honor of geekhood, here’s an essential checklist of must-have geek skills. The term ‘geek’, once used to label a circus freak, has morphed in meaning over the years. What was once an unusual profession transferred into a word indicating social awkwardness. As time has gone on, the word has yet again morphed to indicate a new type of individual: someone who is obsessive over one (or more) particular subjects, whether it be science, photography, electronics, computers, media, or any other field. A geek is one who isn’t satisfied knowing only the surface facts, but instead has a visceral desire to learn everything possible about a particular subject. A techie geek is usually one who knows a little about everything, and is thus the person family and friends turn to whenever they have a question. 2. If you rolled your eyes here, that is a good thing. 1. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

22 Hacking Sites, CTFs and Wargames To Practice Your Hacking Skills InfoSec skills are in such high demand right now. As the world continues to turn everything into an app and connect even the most basic devices to the internet, the demand is only going to grow, so it’s no surprise everyone wants to learn hacking these days. However, almost every day I come across a forum post where someone is asking where they should begin to learn hacking or how to practice hacking. I’ve compiled this list of some of the best hacking sites to hopefully be a valuable resource for those wondering how they can build and practice their hacking skill set. 2. 3. 4. They divide up the challenge into 4 skill levels: Toddler’s Bottle, Rookiss, Grotesque and Hacker’s Secret. 5. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22.

Syncany - Open-source file synchronization and filesharing application Top 15 Open Source/Free Security/Hacking Tools | Security & Hacking Blog 1. Nmap Nmap (“Network Mapper”) is a free and open source (license) utility for network discovery and security auditing. Nmap uses raw IP packets in novel ways to determine what hosts are available on the network, what services (application name and version) those hosts are offering, what operating systems (and OS versions) they are running, what type of packet filters/firewalls are in use, and dozens of other characteristics. Nmap homepage. 2. Wireshark is a network protocol analyzer. 3. Metasploit Community Edition simplifies network discovery and vulnerability verification for specific exploits, increasing the effectiveness of vulnerability scanners. 4. Nikto is an Open Source (GPL) web server scanner which performs comprehensive tests against web servers for multiple items, including over 6400 potentially dangerous files/CGIs, checks for outdated versions of over 1200 servers, and version specific problems on over 270 servers. 5. 6. ettercap 7. 8. 9. 10. w3af 11. hping 12. burpsuite 13.

Malware trends and cyber security considerations for 2015 Last year was a banner one for breaches, cyber attacks and advanced malware. In addition to the high-profile incidents at Sony Pictures after Thanksgiving and Home Depot before that, enterprise CIOs and their cyber security teams also had to deal with the spread of intense distributed denial-of-service attacks and destructive threats such as CryptoLocker. Malware in 2015: Easy to create, but dangerous enough to require attention As February 2015 arrives, there are still many emerging challenges in keeping corporate networks secure. Malware is not only increasingly diversified and capable, but also easier to create. An effective cyber criminal effort could just as well be predicated on an overwhelming amount of simple pieces of malware as it could be upon a monolithic, state-level attack. Paul Christman, vice president of Dell’s Public Sector Software division, noted as much in highlighting the trend toward the creation of “recyclable” malware in particular countries.

10 Greatest Open Source Software Of 2009 These are full-featured cross-platform softwares, free as in beer and speech. Vivek Gite picks his best open source software of 2009. #1: Inkscape ( Vector Graphics Editor ) Fig.01: Inkscape is used by artist/illustrator/designer as vector graphics editor Inkscape is a vector graphics editor. Inkscape supports many advanced SVG features (markers, clones, alpha blending, etc.) and great care is taken in designing a streamlined interface. Download Inkscape #2: 7-Zip ( Archiver ) Fig.02: 7-Zip is used as archiver 7-Zip is a file archiver and open source software. Note: For Linux / UNIX desktop I prefer to use native tools such as zip/unzip, tar etc. #3: VLC ( Media Player ) Fig.03: VLC is similar to QuickTime / Windows Media Player Great media player which supports almost all formats (audio, video formats DVDs / VCDs, and various streaming protocols) and is stripped down to its most fundamental features (i.e. portable media player). Download VLC Media Player #4: VirtualBox ( Virtualization ) Rest...

How To Become A Hacker Copyright © 2001 Eric S. Raymond As editor of the Jargon File and author of a few other well-known documents of similar nature, I often get email requests from enthusiastic network newbies asking (in effect) "how can I learn to be a wizardly hacker?". Back in 1996 I noticed that there didn't seem to be any other FAQs or web documents that addressed this vital question, so I started this one. A lot of hackers now consider it definitive, and I suppose that means it is. Still, I don't claim to be the exclusive authority on this topic; if you don't like what you read here, write your own. If you are reading a snapshot of this document offline, the current version lives at Note: there is a list of Frequently Asked Questions at the end of this document. The five-dots-in-nine-squares diagram that decorates this document is called a glider. If you find this document valuable, please leave me a tip on Gittip. If you want to be a hacker, keep reading.

What are malware, viruses, Spyware, and cookies, and what differentiates them ? What are malware, viruses, Spyware, and cookies, and what differentiates them ? "Malware" is short for malicious software and used as a single term to refer to virus, spy ware, worm etc. Malware is designed to cause damage to a stand alone computer or a networked pc. So wherever a malware term is used it means a program which is designed to damage your computer it may be a virus, worm or Trojan. Worms:- Worms are malicious programs that make copies of themselves again and again on the local drive, network shares, etc. Examples of worm are: - W32.SillyFDC.BBY Packed.Generic.236 W32.Troresba Due to its replication nature it takes a lot of space in the hard drive and consumes more cpu uses which in turn makes the pc too slow also consumes more network bandwidth. Virus:-Virus is a program written to enter to your computer and damage/alter your files/data. Examples of virus are: - W32.Sfc! Viruses can enter to your computer as an attachment of images, greeting, or audio / video files.

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