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1.8 Million Free Works of Art from World-Class Museums: A Meta List of Great Art Available Online

1.8 Million Free Works of Art from World-Class Museums: A Meta List of Great Art Available Online
Since the first stirrings of the internet, artists and curators have puzzled over what the fluidity of online space would do to the experience of viewing works of art. At a conference on the subject in 2001, Susan Hazan of the Israel Museum wondered whether there is “space for enchantment in a technological world?” She referred to Walter Benjamin’s ruminations on the “potentially liberating phenomenon” of technologically reproduced art, yet also noted that “what was forfeited in this process were the ‘aura’ and the authority of the object containing within it the values of cultural heritage and tradition.” Evaluating a number of online galleries of the time, Hazan found that “the speed with which we are able to access remote museums and pull them up side by side on the screen is alarmingly immediate.” Perhaps the “accelerated mobility” of the internet, she worried, “causes objects to become disposable and to decline in significance.” Art Images from Museums & Libraries Art Books

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3,900 Pages of Paul Klee's Personal Notebooks Are Now Online, Presenting His Bauhaus Teachings (1921-1931) Paul Klee led an artistic life that spanned the 19th and 20th centuries, but he kept his aesthetic sensibility tuned to the future. Because of that, much of the Swiss-German Bauhaus-associated painter's work, which at its most distinctive defines its own category of abstraction, still exudes a vitality today. And he left behind not just those 9,000 pieces of art (not counting the hand puppets he made for his son), but plenty of writings as well, the best known of which came out in English as Paul Klee Notebooks, two volumes (The Thinking Eye and The Nature of Nature) collecting the artist's essays on modern art and the lectures he gave at the Bauhaus schools in the 1920s. "These works are considered so important for understanding modern art that they are compared to the importance that Leonardo’s A Treatise on Painting had for Renaissance," says Monoskop. Would you like to support the mission of Open Culture?

25 Million Images From 14 Art Institutions to Be Digitized & Put Online In One Huge Scholarly Archive Digital art archives, says Thomas Gaehtgens, director of the Getty Research Institute, are “Sleeping Beauties, and they are waiting to be discovered and kissed.” It’s an odd metaphor, especially since the archive to which Gaehtgens refers currently contains photographic treasures like that of Medieval Christian art from the Netherlands Institute for Art History. But soon, Pharos, the “International Consortium of Photo Archives,” will host 25 million images, Ted Loos reports at The New York Times, “17 million of them artworks and the rest supplemental material." The archive aims to have 7 million online by 2020. Pharos is the joint effort of 14 different institutions, including the Getty and the Frick, the National Gallery of Art, the Yale Center for British Art, Rome’s Bibliotheca Hertziana, the Courtauld Institute, and more.

Met Museum Open Access Makes 375,000 Pieces Available for Free Claude Monet, Bridge Over a Pond of Water Lilies (1899) Renowned for its comprehensive collection of work that captures “5,000 years of art spanning all cultures and time periods,” New York City’s world famous Metropolitan Museum of Art has recently announced that 375,000 of its pieces in the public domain are now available without restrictions. As an update to a similar 2014 initiative, the new policy, called Open Access, allows individuals to easily access the images and use them for “any purpose, including commercial and noncommercial use, free of charge and without requiring permission from the Museum.” The available works represent a wide range of movements, styles, and mediums, and span iconic paintings by Claude Monet and Vincent van Gogh to centuries-old costumes and armor. You can access the unrestricted images through the Met’s website.

John James Audubon's Birds of America John James Audubon's Birds of America is a portal into the natural world. Printed between 1827 and 1838, it contains 435 life-size watercolors of North American birds (Havell edition), all reproduced from hand-engraved plates, and is considered to be the archetype of wildlife illustration. Nearly 200 years later, the Audubon prints are coming to life once again, thanks to our vibrant digital library. Roam around below and enjoy one of the most treasured pieces of Audubon's grand and wild legacy. The Art Institute of Chicago Puts 44,000+ Works of Art Online: View Them in High Resolution After the fire that totally destroyed Brazil’s Museu Nacional in Rio, many people lamented that the museum had not digitally backed up its collection and pointed to the event as a tragic example of why such digitization is so necessary. Just a couple decades ago, storing and displaying this much information was impossible, so it may seem like a strange demand to make. And in any case, two-dimensional images stored on servers—or even 3D printed copies—cannot replace or substitute for original, priceless artifacts or works of art.

Public Domain Collections: Free to Share & Reuse That means everyone has the freedom to enjoy and reuse these materials in almost limitless ways. The Library now makes it possible to download such items in the highest resolution available directly from the Digital Collections website. Search Digital Collections No permission required. No restrictions on use. How to apply color theory in social media marketing - Ragan Communications Social media is visual. Images (and, increasingly, video) are the most engaging content on all channels. The 3.2 billion active users across all platforms are eager for relevant content, and images are essential to capturing their attention. When people get information paired with an image, they remember 65% of that information three days later, compared with 10% retention of information heard. Facebook posts with images garner 2.3 times the engagement of posts without images. With easy access to cell phones, social media managers can create a steady stream of image content.

Image and Data Resources Open Access Policy The Metropolitan Museum of Art creates, organizes, and disseminates a broad range of digital images and data that document the rich history of the Museum, its collection, exhibitions, events, people, and activities. Images of artworks in the Museum's collection fall into two categories: 100,000 Digitized Art History Books Are Now Freely Available to Any Art Lover “Paul Klee, 1879-1940 : a retrospective exhibition.” The Guggenheim Museum In celebration of its 4th anniversary, the Getty Research Portal has been redesigned to make it easier for art history buffs to explore, share, and download the 100,000 freely available digitized art history texts it hosts—which you can search for directly, or filter by creator, subject, language, source, or date range.

Download 15,000+ Free Golden Age Comics from the Digital Comic Museum The Digital Comic Museum offers free access to hundreds of pre-1959 comic books, uploaded by users who often offer historical research and commentary alongside high-quality scans. The site’s moderators and administrators are particularly careful to avoid posting non-public-domain comics (a complicated designation, as described in this forum thread). The resulting archive is devoid of many familiar comic-book characters, like those from Marvel, D.C., or Disney. On the other hand, because of this restriction, the archive offers an interesting window into the themes of lesser-known comics in the Golden Age—romance, Westerns, combat, crime, supernatural and horror. The covers of the romance comics are great examples of popular art. Interested in understanding how homefront American culture reflected fighting in World War II and Korea, and the anxieties of the Cold War?

60 Totally Free Design Resources for Non-Designers Creating engaging visual content doesn’t have to require a financial investment. Sure, at one time graphic designers needed expensive software and even more costly images to craft a winning visual campaign. But thanks to a host of free online resources, anyone can design high-quality visual stories with ease. Of course, navigating the sea of online images and editing tools is easier said than done. Some require membership, others charge royalty fees, some require advance permission and others charge for high-definition.

Paris Museums Put 100,000 Images Online for Unrestricted Public Use Paris Musées, a collection of 14 museums in Paris have recently made high-res digital copies of 100,000 artworks freely available to the public on their collections website. Artists with works in the archive include Rembrandt, Monet, Picasso, Cézanne, and thousands of others. From Hyperallergic: The Met Just Released 375,000 Priceless Artworks into the Public Domain Edgar Degas, The Dancing Class, 1870, Oil on wood, 7 3/4 x 10 5/8 in. The Metropolitan Museum of Art unloaded a massive chunk of its collection into the public domain on Tuesday, making them available for anyone with an internet connection to use or simply appreciate. As part of a new Open Access Policy, the Met designated 375,000 images with the Creative Commons Zero 1.0 Universal copyright, the broadest possible. Impressionist masters like Cézanne, Monet, and Degas, Japanse woodblock print artists like Hokusai, sculptors like Rodin, and thousands more are available for anyone to "copy, modify, distribute, and perform the work, even for commercial purposes, all without asking permission," according to the Creative Commons.

Metropolitan Museum of Art Releases 400,000 Images, with Restriction Two Met images now available for free scholarly use: (left) Johannes Vermeer, “Study of a Young Woman” (c. 1665–67), oil on canvas, 17 1/2 x 15 3/4 in (44.5 x 40 cm), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wrightsman, in memory of Theodore Rousseau, Jr., 1979 (1979.396.1); (right) Head of the god Amun (c. 1336–1327 BCE), Egyptian, New Kingdom, Post-Amarna Period, granodiorite, 44 cm (17 5/16 in) x 38.2 (15 1/16 in) x 41.5 (16 5/16 in), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Rogers Fund, 1907 (07.228.34) (both images © The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York) Late last Friday, the Metropolitan Museum of Art announced that it has made 400,000 images of artworks in its collection available for free download — but the move comes with a major caveat: the images are only intended for noncommercial, scholarly use. Tagged as: copyright, Metropolitan Museum of Art

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