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DIY Lace Shorts

DIY Lace Shorts
A few weeks ago, our friend Katie showed up wearing the cutest lace trimmed shorts. We were impressed to discover that not only did she DIY them, she made them using boxer shorts! We immediately raced to Target for white boxer shorts and the fabric store for a variety of pretty white lace trims. Honestly, this DIY is so simple and perfect for summer! You’ll need:men’s or boy’s white boxer shorts2 yards of lace trima pair of scissorspinsa sewing machine or needle and thread Pin the lace trim along the inside hem of the shorts, starting at the seam of the inner leg. And you’re done! Wear them as is or layered under skirts. (top image from Tumblr, rest of images by Honestly…WTF)

DIY Botanical Print Jacket We are smitten with Stella McCartney‘s floral ensembles from her Spring 2011 collection, inspired by 18th and 19th century botanical prints. The studies by notable botanists Robert John Thornton and Pierre Joseph Redouté are so incredibly lovely and vibrant that we too were inspired to add a bit of floral flair to our own clothing. Follow the instructions that accompany the iron on transfer papers, as they drastically vary depending on the brand. We chose to add flowers to a small portion of this jacket, but feel free to go wild! (top image from Hanneli, botanical images from here, here, here and here, rest of images from Honestly…WTF)

DIY Ombré Denim Dip dyed ombré denim has been popping up here and there and not only do we love the look, it’s super easy to do yourself! We’ve combined Tory Burch‘s dip dyed jeans and Miss Unkon‘s ombré 501s as inspiration for a pink infused DIY that could be done in a jiffy. Start by rinsing your shorts with water. A bottle of RIT liquid dye amounts to 1 cup; you’ll dye your shorts with the lightest shade first and darkest shade last. Pour 1/3 of the cup of dye into 2 gallons of hot water and mix. When dyeing dark denim, you will want to use less water for a darker dye. Ring out the excess dye and add another 1/3 cup of dye to your bucket. It’s that easy: ombré dip dyed denim shorts! DIY Door Knocker Belt After discovering lion drawer pulls at the hardware store a few weeks ago, we were immediately reminded of this vintage Moschino jacket spotted on Jane of Sea of Shoes. They were obviously too amazing to pass up and we knew we had to incorporate the mini door knockers into a DIY. Luckily, we were able to track down the same lion head drawer pulls online so now you can join in on the fun! You’ll need: Start by placing the drawer pulls along the backside of the belt and place them to your liking. Push the screws through the holes and twist on the drawer pulls, tightening each one with a screwdriver. Your Moschino-inspired belt is finito! Roarrrrr! (top image via Atlantis Home, rest of images by Honestly…WTF)

DIY Shibori Today marks HonestlyWTF’s four year anniversary. Four years! To celebrate, we’re revisiting the very first tutorial we ever featured on the site: shibori tie dye. Lauren and I first discovered shibori after discovering an old photo on the web. You’ll need:an indigo dye kitnatural fiber clothing or fabric2 5 gallon bucketsrubber glovessmall wood squaresrubber bandstwinea PVC pipea long wooden sticka drop clothrubber glovesscissors When choosing fabric or clothing, it’s important that made of natural fibers. Itajime shibori is known as the shape-resist technique. Fold it again in the other direction – again, like an accordion. Arashi is the Japanese term for “storm” and it’s also known as the pole-wrapping technique. Wrap the twine around the fabric. Continue wrapping, scrunching and tightening until all the fabric is compacted. Kumo shibori is known as the pleat and bind technique. Do the same with the opposite side, in staggered sections. Keep binding until you can’t go any further.

DIY Woven Chain Bracelet Chain link bracelets, with colorful threads woven through them, have been popping up here and there. We adore Aurèlie Bidermann‘s Do Brazil bracelets and thought it was about time we graduate to the ultimate “grown-up” friendship bracelet. With a curb chain bracelet and some embroidery thread, we’ll teach you how to make your own woven chain bracelet. You’ll need:a curb link braceletembroidery threadtwo bobby pinsa pair of scissors Cut 2 sets of 15 strands of embroidery thread, with each strand measuring four times the length of the bracelet. Lay the second color (blue) over the first color (coral). Repeat the steps until you reach the end of the bracelet. (top images from here and here, rest of images by Honestly…WTF) DIY Flower Halo You’ll start by cutting 2 circles from the piece of felt at approximately 2″ in diameter. Form the wires of your halo by molding and bending each piece into a half circle. Lay the two half circles opposite of each other to create a single circle, laying it over the top of your head to check the fit. Using the wire cutters, cut the stem off the flower making sure the back is flat. The possibilities are endless with this as you can wrap flowers around half or the entire perimeter of the halo, reinforcing with glue. Your flower halo is ready to wear! (images by Honestly…WTF)

DIY Peter Pan Collar We almost lost our marbles when we first spotted these scalloped white Louis Vuitton collars on the runway. And so when Lucky Magazine asked us to create a tutorial for their November issue, DIYing Peter Pan collars was an absolute no-brainer. Crisp, feminine, and perfect for fall, who would have thought Neverland could look so chic? You’ll need:2 scalloped edged collar pieces cut from white felt or rubber flannel (pattern downloadable here)a single hole punch or leather rotary hole punch1 yard of white ribbona needle and threadhot glue gunbutton Using the pattern template, cut out the two collar pieces. Create small holes between each scallop, using the hole punch. Overlap the two wider end pieces and push a button through the last two aligning holes. Cut the ribbon into two half-yard lengths. Wrap the collar around your neck and tie it into a bow. Your Louis Vuitton inspired peter pan collar is finished! (top image via FGR, rest of images by HonestlyWTF)

DIY Rope Bracelet Climbing rope? Bracelets? Count us in. Inspired by Miansai‘s colorful, stackable and adjustable rope bracelets, we were determined to add another do-it-yourself bracelet to our growing collection. Before you begin, seal the tips of the cord by burning them with a lighter. Coil the cord twice around towards the left loop. Repeat the same steps on the other side. Trim and re-burn the tips if necessary. Try making the bracelets with leather cord too. (top image from here; rest of images from Honestly…WTF) DIY Lace Earrings Dolce & Gabbana‘s Spring ’11 collection undoubtedly furthered our already fanatical obsession with lace. Honestly, how dreamy is the collection?! We thought we’d make good use of some vintage lace trim we had laying around and turn them into earrings similar to the ones we saw on the runway. And thanks to some tips from a DIY previously featured on Poppytalk, making lace earrings proved be a cinch! Mix equal parts glue to water in a bowl. Submerge the cut shapes into the glue mixture. I haven’t stopped wearing mine since and can’t wait to make more. (top image from Vogue.com, rest of images by Honestly…WTF)

Everything Golden » DIY – Block Printing DIY – Block Printing For my latest contribution to Sugar and Charm, I created hand printed napkins. This is a fun and easy way to add personality to anything…napkins, tea towels, t-shirts, onesies, you name it! Once you’ve created your stamp, you’ll want to print on everything in your home! Here’s how you do it… What you need: 1. Instructions: To make the stamp, you’ll first draw your image on the rubber block and start carving away the areas that you don’t want to show. Also, check out DIY – Hand Dyed Vintage Linens for instructions on how to make the tie dyed napkins.

Urban Cheesecraft Mp4 | YouTube | Vimeo | Blip | Subscribe in iTunes Claudia Lucero of Urban Cheesecraft moved to Portland, Oregon in search of a life that emphasized quality over quantity. She started pickling vegetables using a practice known as lacto-fermentation — acquiring produce from her local CSA and dairy whey in liquid form to preserve her shares. In search of a more complete approach of acquiring dairy whey, she started researching cheese recipes online and started her trade with an easy mozzarella. Claudia’s intellectual curiosity led her to question the very milk where her cheese originated. Watch More Etsy Videos

DIY No Knit Scarf We love Rike Feurstein. Her hats are sick and her chunky knits are lusciously bold and amazing. And when we saw her Dylan scarf, we thought it was genius. A scarf that didn’t require knitting? Sign me up! You’ll start by transforming a skein of yarn into a hank of yarn, which is yarn that is loosely wound into a large ring shape and then twisted. Cut 3 pieces of leather at approximately 1.75″ wide and 4″ long. Voila! (top image from here, rest of images by Honestly…WTF) DIY Bleach Tie Dye Last summer, we were obsessed with shibori indigo tie dying. No, really . . . we just about dyed anything white in sight. So when Free People asked us to include a DIY in their guest blogger series, we knew a new tie dye project was absolutely in order. And as the weather is beginning to warm up, what better time than now to start experimenting with reverse tie dye using bleach! Black tees and tops: watch out! To make a grid-like pattern, fold the shirt like an accordion and bind it between two pieces of wood or other flat shaped objects. Before you start bleaching, make sure you are wearing gloves and working outdoors or in a well ventilated area. The rusty brown color will slowly fade into a beautiful lighter shade as it begins to set. Your reverse bleach tie dye shirt is ready to wear! (top image from here, rest of images by HonestlyWTF)

DIY Picnic Blanket & Goodbye (for now) Hi friends! I am so, so sorry for not blogging in so long. Some of you know that I recently had surgery for a severely herniated disk and I was feeling great for a few weeks. I’ve thought long and hard about this decision but I’m afraid I will be officially taking some extended time off from Twig & Thistle to rest and (hopefully) heal. Before I say my final goodbye, I have one last DIY project that I had to share. This project took me about 4 hours total but overall it was pretty easy. Once my pattern was drawn, I used painters tape to seal off the paintable areas – this part definitely took the longest. Lot’s of love to you all and thank you again for visiting!

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