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Welcome to USA for Kids

Welcome to USA for Kids

http://www.usconsulate.org.hk/pas/kids/

Related:  ressources anglaisGrade 1 Social StudiesUnited StatesEnglishFör yngre barn

Using Silent Video in the EFL Classroom This video is the BOMB! It is captivating, absorbing, a story par excellence but also SILENT! Yes, silent films are great for getting students to produce language — and after all is said and done, that most often is the hardest thing to do, getting the students speaking and learning language by just communicating. New York - State History New Yorkers are rightfully proud of their state's many achievements and contributions. This synopsis is adapted from a brief history previously printed in the Legislative Manual. Before the year 1900

London This EFL lesson plan is designed around a short film by Simon Smith who recaptured the shots of London taken by Claude Friese-Greene in 1927. Students talk about what they know about London, compare London in 1927 and now, do a dictation and discuss their home towns. Language level: Intermediate (B1) – Upper Intermediate (B2) Learner type: Teens and adults Time: 90 minutes Free English Reading Comprehension Lesson Plans - Beginner Intermediate and Advanced Free English reading comprehension lesson plans for beginning, intermediate and advanced level of English learning in ESL EFL classes as well as business English classes. Each lesson provides an introduction, step by step teaching guidelines and printable student worksheets. Reading - Identifying Skill RequirementLesson helping students identify different reading types and remind them of different reading skills that they already possess in their native language ESL Reading Lesson - Using Context for Reading LiteracyLesson helping students identify different reading types and remind them of different reading skills that they already possess in their native language Using Reading Comprehension in LessonsIncorporating reading comprehension and dialogues into a lesson plan to help focus on specific grammar or subject areas. The following lesson plan is a blueprint to using these resources for your classes.

American Flag The flag of the United States of America is a national symbol. Every country has a special flag. When people from other countries see our flag, they know it belongs to the United States of America. Our flag is often called the "Stars and Stripes" or "Old Glory." We honor our flag on Flag Day which is celebrated on June 14. Our flag has 13 stripes. Missouri Secretary of State Kids Skip Navigation Register to Vote About Jason Kander Accessibility Info Contact Us Project-based learning, the USA and Authentic Video in the EFL classroom The Globe Trekker/Pilot Guides video collection is a treasure trove for any English teacher. It encompasses extensive material from every corner of the world, and especially English-speaking countries are lavished with attention. Australia, Canada, Scotland, Wales, Ireland, England – you name it. Even individual cities are endowed with an approx. 50-minute complete video of its own, like London, New York City, San Francisco, Los Angeles, New Orleans to name but a few. Covering the United States satisfactorily in the language classroom is a daunting project, especially if you want to give your students more than a superficial understanding of its history, geography, language and people. Most textbooks for EFL students fall short in this respect, and it’s understandable – time available is limited and there is so much more that needs to be covered.

Summer Reading Loss "I know my students covered important reading skills last school year, but I still need to spend so much time reviewing those same skills at the start of the new school year." Comments like this reflect the all too common laments of teachers who, after having worked so hard during the academic year to establish a solid foundation for continued literacy learning, find that when a new school year begins too many of their students seem to be starting from scratch. Often, it is the students who can least afford to lose the reading gains they've achieved during the school year who fall the farthest behind when they return to the classroom after a summer break away from formal literacy instruction.

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