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How Fashion and Retail Brands Are Using Snapchat

How Fashion and Retail Brands Are Using Snapchat
Of the many social networks that have come to the fore in the past decade, none is enjoying quite the same level of buzz at the moment as Snapchat. The smartphone-only social network, whose auto-disappearing messages first made it popular as a sexting tool for teens after its launch in 2011, is now used by more than 100 million people every day — and more than a third of Americans ages 18 to 34 on a monthly basis, with a higher engagement rate than Instagram, according to Comscore. Despite its rampant popularity with such a key consumer demographic, brands — especially high-end fashion and luxury brands — have been slow to embrace the platform relative to older social networks like Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest. These drawbacks haven't deterred fashion and beauty companies completely. Brands like Asos, Everlane, Glossier, H&M, Maybelline, Sephora and Warby Parker often post several times per week. Asos Burberry Everlane Sephora Valentino The Early Adopter Advantage Related:  Fashion Business ContextBusiness context- Designer social mediaPages that interest me

How much do influencers get paid? This Tumblr investigates Shutterstock The line between advertising and content continues to blur, not only in traditional media with "native advertising," but also on social media with sponsored content and influencers. An "influencer" is the umbrella term to describe creatives, typically those with large social media followings on Twitter, Instagram, or Facebook. These influencers work with brands on ad campaigns specifically aimed at their followers. You probably come into contact with influencer content on a daily basis, though you may not realize it unless they use hashtags like #sponsored or #ad. But now a feud between those influencers and the brands they work for is brewing. Though the trouble has been percolating for awhile, everything came to the surface after a recent Digiday interview with an anonymous social media executive who talked about how there are "too many influencers" nowadays and how "the amount of followers you have doesn’t mean sh--." That’s where Discko’s Tumblr comes in.

Warning: how social media is a danger to brands A Marketing Week investigation has found that a range of brands, including Ugg Australia, Mulberry, Ray-Ban and Louis Vuitton are being targeted by unauthorised websites that use social media to promote their claims of selling luxury goods. We uncovered a number of sites not listed in these brands’ published networks of resellers that use links and paid-for advertising space on platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest to bring in web traffic, using brands’ photographs, logos and trademarked words. Social networks are the biggest cause of consumer complaints about fake products and January is the most prolific month of the year for reports being made, according to the Intellectual Property Office. Brand protection company MarkMonitor says online counterfeiting is worth about £10bn annually in the UK. Confirmed counterfeit sites include saleuggs.salesbootsoutlet.com, which is registered under an address in China but uses Ugg Australia branding to sell sheepskin boots. Fake pharma

8 Fashion Snapchat Accounts to Follow This Fashion Week The first thing you need to know about China Machado and her endless enthusiasm for fashion? “I’m crazy, you’ve got to understand this,” says the 87-year-old industry legend, and the model’s landmark career has seen her evolve from being Europe’s premiere runway star and Richard Avedon’s frequent collaborator to becoming an editor, entrepreneur, and designer. Machado has been a constant within fashion for almost six decades, and she is now the subject of an exhibit called “A Muse Among Friends,” on display now at The National Arts Club. The show came as something of a surprise. The show offers more than just a peek at a glamorous existence. With this exhibition, a forthcoming line of clothing called Cheena (influenced by her upbringing in Shanghai), and her continued work as a model, Machado’s greatest achievement isn’t just a stellar career—it’s a life well lived. Sometimes all it takes is one person to believe in you. Know what you’re selling. Small productions can have big results.

Study Proves 2016 Is an Excellent Year to Be a Fashion Blogger | IFB Photo via Shutterstock Fashion and Beauty Monitor published a study yesterday analyzing the scope and impact of “influencers” (that means you) on the fashion and beauty industry. They found that the role of fashion bloggers in content marketing is on a serious upswing. With consumer trust in traditional advertising in sharp decline, consumers have expressed an increasing preference for the opinions of trusted individuals and influencers when it comes to deciding what to buy. The results are not just good news for the top 1%. The study revealed lots more fascinating insight, and reasons why 2016 will be the best year for fashion blogging yet. What do you think of the study?

How Instagram's New Feed Will Impact Brands and Influencers | Fashion-Tech | BoF LONDON, United Kingdom — Back in March, Instagram announced that “in the coming months” it would implement an algorithm that, instead of ordering posts in users’ feeds in reverse-chronological order, will order them based on "the likelihood you’ll be interested in the content," using signals such as likes, comments and searches. Instagram says that users miss on average 70 percent of their feeds, so the change will ensure they see the content that matters to them. The company also tried to reassure its 400 million users that they would be told when the feed was rolled out and that at least initially, no posts will be removed from feeds — they will just be shown in a different order. Still, the announcement caused Insta-chaos. So, what are the influencers worried about? For many influencers, Instagram has become a valuable revenue stream. Karen Robinovitz, chief creative officer at Digital Brand Architects, says there is “potential” for the changes to affect influencer reach.

The Truth About 'Fast' Fashion in 2016 | Huffington Post When it comes to fashion and technology, how fast is too fast? You only have to look at Instagram to realise that taking photos of every waking move is now deemed as ‘normal.’ But what is ‘normal?’ And does normal mean good? So whilst you were busy obsessing over the next big technology craze and taking photos of your latest outfit - ready to post out to your ‘friends’ on Instagram, or you were too busy writing a blog about your latest clothing purchase instead of actually enjoying the moment, you may have missed out on something... One thing that has grabbed tech-addicts by complete surprise is that 2015/2016 has seen the rebirth of traditional mediums and outlets which we’ve started to forget about. In fact, Vinyl outsold streaming and digital downloads. It made online fashion giants such as ASOS question their entire business model. Let’s not forget that Amazon have realised this which is why they have finally decided to open a Bricks and Mortar store.

The Best Fashion Instagrams of the Week: Joan Smalls, Kendall Jenner, Hailey Baldwin, and More The first thing you need to know about China Machado and her endless enthusiasm for fashion? “I’m crazy, you’ve got to understand this,” says the 87-year-old industry legend, and the model’s landmark career has seen her evolve from being Europe’s premiere runway star and Richard Avedon’s frequent collaborator to becoming an editor, entrepreneur, and designer. Machado has been a constant within fashion for almost six decades, and she is now the subject of an exhibit called “A Muse Among Friends,” on display now at The National Arts Club. The show came as something of a surprise. The show offers more than just a peek at a glamorous existence. With this exhibition, a forthcoming line of clothing called Cheena (influenced by her upbringing in Shanghai), and her continued work as a model, Machado’s greatest achievement isn’t just a stellar career—it’s a life well lived. Sometimes all it takes is one person to believe in you. Know what you’re selling. Small productions can have big results.

For Young Brands, Is the Instagram Opportunity Shrinking? | Intelligence | BoF LONDON, United Kingdom — When Andrew Jennings launched minimalist watch brand Larsson & Jennings in April 2012, Instagram was still young. Only 18 months after launch, with 30 million users (a fraction of its current user base, which exceeds half a billion people), the platform had just been acquired by Facebook. But Jennings was quick to identify its potential for driving buzz and sales for his fledgling direct-to-consumer brand without a large marketing budget. Through a combination of his own content and collaborations with emerging influencers, by the end of 2013, Larsson & Jennings had acquired 100,000 Instagram followers. Over the same period, Larsson & Jennings drove £2.5 million (about $3.18 million) in revenue. Larsson & Jennings certainly wasn’t the only emerging brand to leverage the marketing opportunity on Instagram. Instagram “is incredibly democratic,” says Eva Chen, head of fashion partnerships at the company. It has also become more costly. Related Articles:

More influencers, fewer posts: How Instagram's algorithm will affect fashion brands The heyday of organic reach for brands on Instagram is over. Instagram is switching to an algorithm-based model for its photo stream, putting more pressure on brands to create quality content if they want it to rise to the top of followers’ news feeds. For fashion brands, Instagram has become the most important social media platform in terms of engagement, with interactions outpacing LinkedIn, Pinterest, Twitter and Facebook at a rate of 13 to 1, according to social media analytics firm TrackMaven. They’re also everywhere on the platform: 98 percent of digital think tank L2’s fashion index brands are active on Instagram. Advertisement Fashion and apparel brands are posting more, seeing more engagement and growing followers at a faster rate than any other B2C category, per TrackMaven. And not only are these brands using Instagram to get in front of customers, they’re also looking to the platform to help inform business decisions. Two things only brands believe they can do.

Ten of the biggest Fashion brands use social media effectively This is a post by our very own Rebecca who is obsessed with social media and fashion. The fashion industry might have taken a little longer to cotton on to the power of social media marketing, but many of the brands embracing the medium - from luxury to high-street - are doing it with style. You wouldn’t expect anything less really. Here, in no particular order, are ten such brands. Being an online retailer, ASOS has little choice but to embrace all things web-based, including social media. 2. With its strong Facebook and Twitter presence and 3-year history of creative online marketing ventures, this basics retailer has been making its mark on the social media landscape. DKNY are among the best in class when it comes to successful social media strategy. 4. Topshop is streets ahead when it comes to engaging with their (one million-plus) Facebook fans and 107,000 followers on Twitter. 5. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Are ‘See Now, Buy Now’ Shows Driving Sales? | Intelligence | BoF LONDON, United Kingdom — The fashion industry’s “see now, buy now” experiment is underway. Over the last few weeks, brands including Tom Ford, Burberry, Tommy Hilfiger and Ralph Lauren staged their first shoppable runway shows, enabling customers to buy their collections immediately after they debut on the catwalk, with the aim to translate the interest and excitement generated by runway shows into sales. BoF spoke to key brands and retailers to gauge the impact of the “see now, buy now” shows in the hours, days and weeks that followed, with some reporting sales spikes immediately after the runway shows. “We had our largest Tom Ford day of the year immediately following his New York show,” revealed Joshua Schulman, president of Bergdorf Goodman and Neiman Marcus Group International. “Typically, these sales would be spread over many weeks as the deliveries arrive piecemeal. Topshop Unique Spring/Summer 2017 | Source: Indigital Related Articles:

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