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The tundra biome

The tundra biome
Online exhibits : The world's biomes The tundra biome Tundra is the coldest of all the biomes. Tundra comes from the Finnish word tunturi, meaning treeless plain. It is noted for its frost-molded landscapes, extremely low temperatures, little precipitation, poor nutrients, and short growing seasons. Dead organic material functions as a nutrient pool. Characteristics of tundra include: Extremely cold climate Low biotic diversity Simple vegetation structure Limitation of drainage Short season of growth and reproduction Energy and nutrients in the form of dead organic material Large population oscillations Tundra is separated into two types: Arctic tundra Arctic tundra is located in the northern hemisphere, encircling the north pole and extending south to the coniferous forests of the taiga. All of the plants are adapted to sweeping winds and disturbances of the soil. Animals are adapted to handle long, cold winters and to breed and raise young quickly in the summer. Alpine tundra

http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/exhibits/biomes/tundra.php

Related:  Seasonal Changes

The Köppen Climate Classification System In: The Cold Climate Updated 29 Jan 2013 Did you know that the Arctic Tundra is the world's youngest biome? It was formed 10,000 years ago. Located at latitudes 55° to 70° North, the tundra is a vast and treeless land which covers about 20% of the Earth's surface, circumnavigating the North pole. It is usually very cold, and the land is pretty stark. Tundra In physical geography, tundra is type of biome where the tree growth is hindered by low temperatures and short growing seasons. The term tundra comes through Russian тундра from the Kildin Sami word tūndâr "uplands", "treeless mountain tract".[1] There are three types of tundra: arctic tundra,[2] alpine tundra,[2] and Antarctic tundra.[3] In tundra, the vegetation is composed of dwarf shrubs, sedges and grasses, mosses, and lichens. Scattered trees grow in some tundra regions. The ecotone (or ecological boundary region) between the tundra and the forest is known as the tree line or timberline. Arctic

Tundra Tundras are among Earth's coldest, harshest biomes. Tundra ecosystems are treeless regions found in the Arctic and on the tops of mountains, where the climate is cold and windy and rainfall is scant. Tundra lands are snow-covered for much of the year, until summer brings a burst of wildflowers. Mountain goats, sheep, marmots, and birds live in mountain, or alpine, tundra and feed on the low-lying plants and insects. Hardy flora like cushion plants survive on these mountain plains by growing in rock depressions where it is warmer and they are sheltered from the wind. The Arctic tundra, where the average temperature is 10 to 20 degrees Fahrenheit (-12 to -6 degrees Celsius), supports a variety of animal species, including Arctic foxes, polar bears, gray wolves, caribou, snow geese and musk-oxen.

Lennox Island residents may be the first climate change refugees in Canada As sea level rise threatens homes, indigenous people living on tiny Lennox Island face the possibility of becoming Canada‘s first climate change refugees. 450 Mi’kmaq people reside there, and have tried to protect their coasts with rock. Ultimately, however, loss of land will likely force them to relocate. Lennox Island, which is right by Prince Edward Island, is losing land as sea levels creep upwards.

KDE Santa Barbara Location | Weather | Plants | Animals | People | Games | Links LOCATION: The tundra biome is the coldest of all biomes. It is also quite big. Tundra Climate Tundra Climate (E) The tundra is a bleak and treeless place. It is cold through all months of the year Summer is a brief period of milder climates when the sun shines almost 24 hours a day. It has been called "the land of the midnight sun". But even the sun can't warm the tundra much. The short summer lasts only 6 to 10 weeks. *Tundra encroachment by tundra due to climate change In Alaska, trees growing at the very edge of their northern range may be influenced by warming climate. Will they eventually take over the tundra beyond? Scientists from Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and other institutions are studying how these remote ecosystems may change. Here’s a video from scientists at the northern edge of the treeline.

The Tundra Biome The Tundra Biome In the tundra, conditions are cold, with an annual average temperature less than 5 C, and precipitation (mostly in the form of snow) less than 100 mm per year (see figure at right). The summer is brief, with temperatures above freezing lasting for only a few weeks at most. However, this "warm" summer coincides with periods of almost 24 hour daylight, so plant growth can be explosive. The map below shows the tundra spreading across the northern hemisphere. Earth Floor: Biomes Arctic Tundra Arctic tundra is found across northern Alaska, Canada, and Siberia. This biome has long cold winters and short cool summers. The Arctic tundra has low precipitation (less than 10 inches per year) and dry winds. These conditions make the Arctic tundra a desert-like climate (see climograph). One unique characteristic of the Arctic tundra is permafrost--ground that is permanently frozen.

Tundra Landforms Pictures Click here to show (or hide) search and display options [ For a large image and details: click on photo to stay in current window, click on photo ID to open new window.] There are 40 pictures on this page out of 172 pictures of Tundra Landforms, available as stock photos and fine art prints.

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