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Entheogen

Entheogen
A group of peyotes, in cultivation. Peyote has been used in ritual contexts for thousands of years.[1][2][3] With the advent of organic chemistry, there now exist many synthetic drugs with similar psychoactive properties, many derived from these plants. Etymology[edit] The neologism entheogen was coined in 1979 by a group of ethnobotanists and scholars of mythology (Carl A. Entheogen was coined as a replacement for the terms hallucinogen and psychedelic. Ruck et al. argued that the term hallucinogen was inappropriate owing to its etymological relationship to words relating to delirium and insanity. In a strict sense, only those vision-producing drugs that can be shown to have figured in shamanic or religious rites would be designated entheogens, but in a looser sense, the term could also be applied to other drugs, both natural and artificial, that induce alterations of consciousness similar to those documented for ritual ingestion of traditional entheogens. Entheogens[edit] Species[edit] Related:  God's Lil' Helper Manna from Heavenwikipedia

Michael Persinger Michael A. Persinger (born June 26, 1945) is a cognitive neuroscience researcher and university professor with over 200 peer-reviewed publications. He has worked at Laurentian University, located in Sudbury, Ontario, since 1971. Early life[edit] Research and academic work[edit] Much of his work focuses on the commonalities that exist between the sciences, and aims to integrate fundamental concepts of various branches of science.[8] He organized the Behavioral Neuroscience Program at Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario, integrating chemistry, biology and psychology. Research in parapsychology[edit] Research in neurotheology[edit] During the 1980s he stimulated people's temporal lobes artificially with a weak magnetic field to see if he could induce a religious state (see God helmet). The only published attempt to replicate these effects failed to do so and concluded that subjects' reports correlated with their personality characteristics and suggestibility. Tectonic Strain Theory[edit]

Psychonautics Psychonautics (from the Greek ψυχή (psychē "soul/spirit/mind") and ναύτης (naútēs "sailor/navigator")—a sailor of the mind/soul)[1] refers both to a methodology for describing and explaining the subjective effects of altered states of consciousness, including those induced by meditation or mind-altering substances, and to a research paradigm in which the researcher voluntarily immerses himself or herself into an altered mental state in order to explore the accompanying experiences.[2] The term has been applied diversely, to cover all activities by which altered states are induced and utilized for spiritual purposes or the exploration of the human condition, including shamanism, lamas of the Tibetan Buddhist tradition,[3] sensory deprivation,[1] and archaic/modern drug users who use entheogenic substances in order to gain deeper insights and spiritual experiences.[4] A person who uses altered states for such exploration is known as a psychonaut. Etymology and categorization[edit] Peter J.

Uttar Pradesh Association of Dead People The Uttar Pradesh Association of Dead People (Uttar Pradesh Mritak Sangh) is a northern Indian pressure group that seeks to reclaim the legal rights of those falsely listed by the Indian government as being dead. In the overcrowded regions of Uttar Pradesh, many have resorted to bribing officials to have the owner of a plot declared deceased and the land transferred to their ownership. The process to undo this is long, arduous, as well as often hopelessly inefficient and corrupt — not to mention that those least able to fight back make excellent victims. The Association seeks to reverse the declarations, call attention to the problem and prevent others from being exploited in similar fashion. The founder and president is Lal Bihari, who was "dead" from 1976 to 1994 and used the word Mritak (Dead) in his name during the period. History[edit] Lal Bihari[edit] In 1976 15 year old Lal Bihari's application for loan in a bank in Azamgarh was denied. External links[edit]

Kathleen Harrison Vault Kathleen Harrison is an ethnobotanist, artist, and photographer who researches the relationship between plants and people, with a particular focus on art, myth, ritual, and spirituality. Harrison teaches in Hawaii, California, and the Peruvian Amazon. She has done fieldwork in Latin America for 30 years, and is the President and Projects Director of Botanical Dimensions, a non-profit foundation devoted to preserving medicinal and shamanic plant knowledge from the Amazonian rainforest and tropics around the world. Harrison is a popular lecturer at conferences, seminars, and workshops; she continues to document the many faces of ethnobotany with photographs, which she combines with stories in her slide presentations. Indole alkaloid History[edit] The action of some indole alkaloids has been known for ages. Aztecs used the psilocybin mushrooms which contain alkaloids psilocybin and psilocin. Consumption of rye and related cereals contaminated with the fungus Claviceps purpurea causes ergot poisoning and ergotism in humans and other mammals. The first indole alkaloid, strychnine, was isolated by Pierre Joseph Pelletier and Joseph Bienaimé Caventou in 1818 from the plants of the Strychnos genus. Classification[edit] Depending on their biosynthesis, two types of indole alkaloids are distinguished; isoprenoids and non-isoprenoids. Non-isoprenoid: Simple derivatives of indoleSimple derivatives of β-carbolinePyrroloindole alkaloidsIsoprenoid: There are also purely structural classifications based on the presence of carbazole, β-carboline or other units in the carbon skeleton of the alkaloid molecule.[9] Some 200 dimeric indole alkaloids are known with two indole groups.[10] Non-isoprenoid indole alkaloids[edit]

Abiogenesis Scientific hypotheses about the origins of life can be divided into a number of categories. Many approaches investigate how self-replicating molecules or their components came into existence. On the assumption that life originated spontaneously on Earth, the Miller–Urey experiment and similar experiments demonstrated that most amino acids, often called "the building blocks of life", can be racemically synthesized in conditions which were intended to be similar to those of the early Earth. Several mechanisms have been investigated, including lightning and radiation. Other approaches ("metabolism first" hypotheses) focus on understanding how catalysis in chemical systems in the early Earth might have provided the precursor molecules necessary for self-replication. Early conditions[edit] The Hadean Earth is thought to have had a secondary atmosphere, formed through degassing of the rocks that accumulated from planetesimal impactors. The earliest life on Earth[edit] Current models[edit]

Kathleen Harrison Vault : Kat Harrison, Botanical Dimensions, and the Shamanic Plant Mind Since the introduction of shamanic plants and medicines to Western science, many anthropologists and laboratory wizards have struggled to divine their cultural significance and figure out how they work their peculiar magic. Yet, in spite of all the work done in university laboratories, sterile hospitals, and million-dollar pharmaceutical research wings, conventional science has done little to unravel the ancient mysteries of shamanic healing power. Divorced from traditional contexts, shamanic folk medicines and visionary practices have remained a mystery. It is only recently, through the work of researchers in the "softer" sciences of ethno- and entheobotany, that the true role of these plants could be understood in terms the Western mind could appreciate. Despite the ancient wisdom and power offered by these plant spirits, shamanic plants and practices are now threatened by the encroachment of industrialized forces into rainforest societies.

Psilocin Psilocin (also known as 4-OH-DMT, psilocine, psilocyn, or psilotsin), is a substituted tryptamine alkaloid and a serotonergic psychedelic substance. It is present in most psychedelic mushrooms together with its phosphorylated counterpart psilocybin. Psilocin is a Schedule I drug under the Convention on Psychotropic Substances.[2] The mind-altering effects of psilocin are highly variable and subjective and resemble those of LSD and DMT. Chemistry[edit] Psilocin and its phosphorylated cousin, psilocybin, were first isolated and named in 1958 by Swiss chemist Albert Hofmann. Psilocin is relatively unstable in solution due to its phenolic hydroxy (-OH) group. Structural analogs[edit] Sulphur analogs are known with a benzothienyl replacement[4] as well as 4-SH-DMT.[5] N1-methylpsilocin is a functionally 5-HT2C receptor preferring agonists.[6] 4-fluoro-N,N-dimethyltryptamine is known.[6] O-Acetylpsilocin is an acetylized analog of psilocin, also known as 4-AcO-DMT. Pharmacology[edit]

Kaspar Hauser Kaspar Hauser (30 April 1812 (?) – 17 December 1833) was a German youth who claimed to have grown up in the total isolation of a darkened cell. Hauser's claims, and his subsequent death by stabbing, sparked much debate and controversy. Theories propounded at the time linked him with the grand ducal House of Baden. History[edit] First appearance[edit] There was another short letter enclosed purporting to be from his mother to his prior caretaker. A shoemaker named Weickmann took the boy to the house of Captain von Wessenig, where he would repeat only the words "I want to be a cavalryman, as my father was" and "Horse! He spent the following two months in Vestner Gate Tower (de) in the care of a jailer named Andreas Hiltel. Statue of Kaspar, old city centre, Ansbach, Germany Hauser's story about his life in a dungeon[edit] He claimed that he found bread and water next to his bed each morning. This tale aroused great curiosity and made Hauser an object of international attention. Burial[edit]

Aldous Huxley Aldous Leonard Huxley /ˈhʌksli/ (26 July 1894 – 22 November 1963) was an English writer, philosopher and a prominent member of the Huxley family. He was best known for his novels including Brave New World, set in a dystopian London, and for non-fiction books, such as The Doors of Perception, which recalls experiences when taking a psychedelic drug, and a wide-ranging output of essays. Early in his career Huxley edited the magazine Oxford Poetry, and published short stories and poetry. Mid career and later, he published travel writing, film stories and scripts. He spent the later part of his life in the US, living in Los Angeles from 1937 until his death. In 1962, a year before his death, he was elected Companion of Literature by the Royal Society of Literature.[1] Huxley was a humanist, pacifist, and satirist. Early life[edit] Huxley began his learning in his father's well-equipped botanical laboratory, then went to Hillside School, Malvern. Career[edit] Bloomsbury Set[edit] Eyesight[edit]

Psilocybin Psilocybin[nb 1] (/ˌsɪləˈsaɪbɪn/ SIL-ə-SY-bin) is a naturally occurring psychedelic compound produced by more than 200 species of mushrooms, collectively known as psilocybin mushrooms. The most potent are members of the genus Psilocybe, such as P. azurescens, P. semilanceata, and P. cyanescens, but psilocybin has also been isolated from about a dozen other genera. As a prodrug, psilocybin is quickly converted by the body to psilocin, which has mind-altering effects similar (in some aspects) to those of LSD, mescaline, and DMT. In general, the effects include euphoria, visual and mental hallucinations, changes in perception, a distorted sense of time, and spiritual experiences, and can include possible adverse reactions such as nausea and panic attacks. History[edit] Early[edit] Modern[edit] Albert Hofmann (shown here in 1993) purified psilocybin and psilocin from Psilocybe mexicana in the late 1950s. Occurrence[edit]

Doctor Sleep (novel) I mentioned two potential projects while I was on the road, one a new Mid-World book (not directly about Roland Deschain, but yes, he and his friend Cuthbert are in it, hunting a skin-man, which are what werewolves are called in that lost kingdom) and a sequel to The Shining called Doctor Sleep. Are you interested in reading either of these? If so, which one turns your dials more? [We] will be counting your votes (and of course it all means nothing if the muse doesn't speak).[7] Voting ended on December 31, 2009, and it was revealed that Doctor Sleep received 5,861 votes, while The Wind Through the Keyhole received 5,812.[8] In an interview with Entertainment Weekly, King revealed that he had hired researcher Rocky Wood to work on the continuity between The Shining and Doctor Sleep.[12] On May 8, 2012, Stephen King's official website announced a tentative publication date of January 15, 2013 for Doctor Sleep.

Jeremy Narby Jeremy Narby (born 1959) is an anthropologist and writer. Narby grew up in Canada and Switzerland, studied history at the University of Canterbury, and received a doctorate in anthropology from Stanford University. Narby spent several years living with the Ashaninca in the Peruvian Amazon cataloging indigenous uses of rainforest resources to help combat ecological destruction. Narby has written three books, as well as sponsored an expedition to the rainforest for biologists and other scientists to examine indigenous knowledge systems and the utility of Ayahuasca in gaining knowledge. Since 1989, Narby has been working as the Amazonian projects director for the Swiss NGO, Nouvelle Planète. Books[edit] External links[edit] "The Cosmic Serpent" an interview in ascent magazine.

2C-B History[edit] 2C-B was synthesized from 2,5-dimethoxybenzaldehyde by Alexander Shulgin in 1974. It first saw use among the psychiatric community as an aid during therapy. Internationally, 2C-B is a Schedule II drug under the Convention on Psychotropic Substances.[5] In the Netherlands, 2C-B became a list I substance of the Opium Law despite no health incidents occurring. Patterns of use[edit] 2C-B first became popularized in the United States as a short-lived legal substitute for the street drug Ecstasy when MDMA became illegal in 1985.[7] Many 2C-B users are young adults who attend raves.[1] Though 2C-B is still used in the rave subculture, commonly mistaken for and/or sold as Ecstasy, its intentional use has become more common.[8] In recent years, 2C-B has emerged as the drug of choice for club drug users in Colombia.[7] Street prices range between $10–30 per tablet in the United States when bought in small quantities.[1] Larger retail purchases cost between $200 and $500 per gram.

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