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How Information Graphics Reveal Your Brain’s Blind Spots

How Information Graphics Reveal Your Brain’s Blind Spots
This story was co-published with Source. Visual Evidence Data and design in everyday life Lena Groeger Welcome to Visual Evidence, a new regular series about visualization in the real world! We’ll take a look at unexpected datasets, cool design solutions or insightful graphics. Chances are, you probably think your mind works pretty well. But you’d be wrong. Let’s look at some of the wacky things our minds make us think and do. Our Mind’s Everyday Quirks We’ll start with a study of Israeli judges done by researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel and Columbia University. Yup. As you can see in the chart, the rate of favorable rulings starts at around 65% early in the day, then drops to almost zero, and then spikes back up again after the judges come back from a meal break. The paper ominously concludes: “Indeed, the caricature that justice is what the judge ate for breakfast might be an appropriate caricature for human decision-making in general.” Visuals Fool Our Minds, Too

https://www.propublica.org/article/how-information-graphics-reveal-your-brains-blind-spots

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Even the Thought of Earning Less than Their Wives Changes How Men Behave Masculinity is a fragile thing. Volumes of research in sociology and political science over the past 20 years have shown that men often react in surprisingly strong ways to what they see as threats to their masculine identities. These reactions are most visible in the political world, but they can take place at home and in the office as well, and can potentially contribute to a toxic work environment. A notable recent example of how men react to a threat to their masculinity comes from a survey experiment that I carried out with my colleagues at Fairleigh Dickinson University’s PublicMind poll. 70 Ways to Increase Your Brain Power 28. Creatine. This is a compound found in meat, used by athletes to help build muscle. Now the evidence is here to show that it helps your brain as well.

Twenty Cognitive Biases That Could Be Helping You Make Bad Decisions The human mind is a beautiful thing. Our ability to perceive, manage and express our individual experiences has been a huge reason for our success as a species. However, let’s not get too narcissistic. As rational as we like to think we are, our brain is riddled with ingrained patterns of thought which can lead us to be very irrational. Claims, Evidence, Reasoning: Integrating Art & Science Antoinette Pippin teaches fifth grade at the Dr. Theodore T. Alexander Jr. The Science Behind Motivation (Video) How often do you hear people say things like, “Ugh, I would totally do that if I could just get motivated,” as if it’s something you can pick up at the store? What if it wasn’t necessarily all about your personal drive and instead had a science behind it that could help you reach your goals? In the video below, AsapSCIENCE explains everything you need to know regarding what we understand about motivation, plus how to harness it to get you were you want to go. Photo of runner courtesy of Shutterstock. About The Author Lily is a writer, editor, and social media manager, as well as co-founder of The Prospect, the world’s largest student-run college access organization.

How They Get It: A New, Simple Taxonomy For Understanding How They Get It: A New, Simple Taxonomy For Understanding by Terry Heick How can you tell if a student really understands something? They learn early on to fake understanding exceptionally well, and even the best assessment leaves something on the table.

Teens do better in science when they know Einstein and Curie also struggled Safe to say, Federal Bureau of Investigation director James Comey was unprepared for a barrage of technical questions by California congressman Darrell Issa (R), during a hearing on iPhone encryption. The House Judiciary Committee is holding a hearing today (March 1) after Apple refused to comply with a federal court order to help the FBI break into the iPhone 5c of one of the San Bernardino shooters by bypassing a security feature that erases its data after too many unsuccessful unlocking attempts. To do so, Apple said it would have to create a special version of its mobile operating system. In his opening statement at the hearing, Comey described the FBI’s request as akin to “asking Apple to take away the vicious guard dog and let[ting] us pick the lock.” During his five minutes of questioning, Issa repeatedly asked if the FBI had tried other solutions before asking Apple to comply.

Big Thinkers: Howard Gardner on Multiple Intelligences Howard Gardner: We have schools because we hope that someday when children have left schools that they will still be able to use what it is that they've learned. And there is now a massive amount of evidence from all realms of science that unless individuals take a very active role in what it is that they're studying, unless they learn to ask questions, to do things hands-on, to essentially recreate things in their own mind and then transform them as is needed, the ideas just disappear. The student may have a good grade on the exam. We may think that he or she is learning, but a year or two later there's nothing left. The idea of multiple intelligences comes out of psychology.

The psychology of narcissism - W. Keith Campbell Interested in learning more on narcissism? Here are the abstracts for two good papers: Narcissism at the crossroads: Phenotypic description of pathological narcissism across clinical theory, social/personality psychology, and psychiatric diagnosis and Grandiose and vulnerable narcissism: A nomological network analysis. These papers describing vulnerable and grandiose narcissism can be found on Google scholar or at your local university library. The clinical description of narcissistic personality can be found in the .

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