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17 Signs Your Classroom is Behind the Times

17 Signs Your Classroom is Behind the Times
1.) Your students turn in their homework on printed paper...instead of digitally. 2.) For poster assignments, your students need glue, construction paper, and scissors... instead of using an online tool like Glogster. 3.) You still have chalk. 4.) 5.) 6.) 7.) 8.) 9.) 10.) 11.) 12.) 13.) 14.) 15.) 16.) 17.) What would you add to this list? Share this post with your friends and colleagues: Related:  Teaching resources21st Century Classroom

100 Incredible & Educational Virtual Tours You Don’t Want to Miss By Katheryn Rivas One of the wonders of the Internet is that it can bring the world to you instead of your needing to find the time and money to explore the traditional way. The following virtual tours bring opportunities to explore cities, famous landmarks and buildings, museums, college campuses, and even outer space. You can learn how things are made, explore the human body or that of a life-sized whale, and visit ball parks and theme parks. Cities From historic cities hundreds of years old to newer cities, these tours take you all around the world. Pompeii, Italy. Famous Landmarks and Buildings Take these tours to visit the Taj Mahal and the Palace of Versailles in the same day. Explore the Taj Mahal. Museums Take a peek inside these museums to learn about history, read ancient books, or view some of the most revered works of art available. Louvre. College Campuses Harvard Virtual Tour. Outer Space These virtual tours offer a glimpse at a world far beyond the everyday existence. Ball Parks

Twenty Everyday Ways to Model Technology Use for Students I wanted to post a list that talked about how to "use" technology in the classroom, but I found myself revising that word "use" to the more general word, "model." The reason I did this is because so many teachers believe that if students aren't actively sitting in front of the computer screen themselves, then clearly technology is not being used in the classroom. This myth can be a gatekeeper of sorts for many teachers, and I wanted to create a list that both gives advice on how to "use" but also acknowledges that in simply modeling the use the of technology, the students are also learning to use it in an indirect way. It's all about Think Aloud, that age-old trick of simply narrating everything you are doing as the wiser, more experienced brain in the room. Narrate your decisions and your rationale and you will be teaching your students how to make good decisions online and off. #1. #2. #3. #4. #5. #6. #7. #8. #9. #10. #11. #12. #13. #14. #15. #16. #17. #18. #19. #20.

Apple TV In The Classroom – The New Smart Board An iPad and Apple TV can combine to provide an advantageous alternative to more expensive, traditional interactive white boards. Guest writer and High School Principal David Mahaley is using this approach and offers his insights, and observations from educators in his school. With the integration of the iPad into the instructional environment, teachers and students have discovered many new ways in which the device can expand and enhance the learning environment. With the iPad, the Apple TV can offer a flexible, complete, and cost efficient alternative to the traditional interactive boards populating our classrooms. As a school administrator and teacher, I have explored the Apple TV and its offerings as an alternative to one of the many types of interactive whiteboards currently available to instructors. Image by K.Walsh, Apple TV logo source: www.apple.com/appletv I recently asked my instructors who were long standing Smart and Panaboard users in my school to come give the Apple TV a try.

Beyond Cut-and-Paste Eliminate Topical Research Rituals The first step in fighting against simple cut-and-paste thinking is to gather all teachers together to discuss and adopt a school-wide policy outlawing the assignment of topical research projects. "Students in this school will conduct research on questions of import that require they make answers rather than find them. We will no longer assign topical research or accept papers that are little more than a rehash of other people's ideas and thinking." Replacing Topical Research with Questions of Import Questions of import usually require that students wrestle with difficult challenges and build their own answers rather than relying upon the thinking of others. Example: Which of the following captains was the best at navigation? Captain James Cook Captain Matthew Flinders Captain George Vancouver Captain William Bligh The above question requires the collection and weighing of evidence to substantiate a well-considered judgment. 21st Century Skills 1. 2. 3. 4.

Debate Forum | Online Debate Community | CreateDebate Lesson Plan: Graffiti Wall: Discussing and Responding to Literature Using Graphics Overview Featured Resources From Theory to Practice This lesson is used for discussion of a novel read by the whole class. back to top Literary Graffiti Interactive: Using this online tool, students draw images about a text they are reading. Claggett (1992) states that "the use of graphics will help students make meaning as they read, write, and act, [which] is firmly rooted in current thinking about how the mind works." Teaching students to visualize what they are reading and create graphic symbols helps them develop as readers. Further Reading Claggett, Fran, and Joan Brown. 1992. Armstrong, Thomas. 2003. Dale, Helen. 1997. Cakes, Snakes and Boxes: Passion-based Learning & Early Literacy Making Patterns with Cake “Puffed wheat, brownie, rice krispie, brownie, puffed wheat, brownie, rice krispie, brownie” chanted one of my students as she explained the pattern she had just made with pieces of cake. We were in the middle of a passion-based learning (PBL) unit themed around patterning. “I wonder if you can make patterns with cake” one of my students had asked? And so we tried it. I have wondered for a long time how passion and project based learning would change my primary classroom. Starting Out Our Wonder Wall and What We Learned Space I decided to do a patterning unit first, and kicked it off by showing the students an Animoto I had made with copyright-free photos of patterns in the environment. The questions came very slowly at first (they had only been in my class a couple of days and we were still getting to know each other), but by the end of our discussion, all of the students had had at least one question. Stepping Out Patterning with Empty Paper Boxes

Home Page | Skills Workshop Digital Differentiation ~ Cool Tools for 21st Century Learners Technology is a tool that can be used to help teachers facilitate learning experiences that address the diverse learning needs of all students and help them develop 21st Century Skills. At it's most basic level, digital tools can be used to help students find, understand and use information. When combined with student-driven learning experiences fueled by Essential Questions offering flexible learning paths, it can be the ticket to success. Here is a closer look at three components of effectively using technology as a tool for digital differentiation. Note: The interactive graphics you see below have been updated. The goal is to design student-driven learning experiences that are fueled by standards-based Essential Questions and facilitated by digital tools to provide students with flexible learning paths. Essential Questions: Student-driven learning experiences should be driven by standards-based Essential Questions. Teacher Facilitated Learning Experiences:

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