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Virtual Tours and Fieldtrips

Virtual Tours and Fieldtrips
Virtual Fieldtrips, Virtual Tours Virtual Tours of Museums and Exhibits Tour The American Museum of Natural History You can find 360 degree tours of dioramas, pictures, and video. Tour an Ancient Roman Villa In this virtual tour, you can see the villa from all sides and enter the inside rooms. Tour The Collection at The National Gallery of Art You can perform a search by artist, title, or subject. Museo Galileo Institute and Museum of the History of Science The Online Catalogue of the museum presents the more than 1,200 objects on permanent exhibition through color images and detailed descriptions. Holocaust Museum Tour Find pictures, video, and art from the Holcaust Museum. Tour The Museum of Unnatural Mystery Tour the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, learn about geology, and some strange things. Online Exhibitions from the Natural History Museum in London Explore art themes, botanical illustrations, and save images of your favorite exhibits. Virtual Gettysburg

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Visible Thinking Purpose and Goals Visible Thinking is a flexible and systematic research-based approach to integrating the development of students' thinking with content learning across subject matters. An extensive and adaptable collection of practices, Visible Thinking has a double goal: on the one hand, to cultivate students' thinking skills and dispositions, and, on the other, to deepen content learning. By thinking dispositions, we mean curiosity, concern for truth and understanding, a creative mindset, not just being skilled but also alert to thinking and learning opportunities and eager to take them

Cool Ways to Use Skype in the Classroom Imagine taking your class on an "around the world" field trip or having your favorite children's author lead today's read-aloud. You can do both of these and more without leaving your classroom thanks to Skype. It's a great use of technology in the classroom! Skype is free communication software that allows you to make calls, instant message and video conference online. Here are just a few of the endless possibilities for using this ed tech tool in the classroom. One amazing experience you can have with Skype in the classroom is a virtual author visit or other amazing guest speaker.

Are we teaching math all wrong? By Carol Lloyd As sure as one plus one equals two, it happens year after year. Kids who have been bringing home A's in chemistry and acing AP Calculus arrive at college with visions of STEM careers dancing in their heads. Then they hit an invisible, but very painful, wall. According to research from the University of California, Los Angeles, as many as 60 percent of all college students who intend to study a STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) subject end up transferring out. In an era when politicians and educators are beside themselves with worry over American students’ lagging math and science scores compared to the whiz kids of Shanghai and Japan, this attrition trend so troubles experts it has spawned an entire field of research on "STEM drop-out," citing reasons from gender and race to GPAs and peer relationships.

12 Best YouTube Channels for Kids and Teens YouTube's statistics never cease to amaze: more than 1 billion unique users per month, over 6 billion hours of video watched per month, 100 hours of video uploaded to YouTube every minute. Fine, but what if you want to find something for your kids to watch besides expletive-laced game commentary and twerking videos? You're in luck.

Discover and Create Your Own Field Trips The Internet expands your classroom like the "Big Bang"—shattering the walls in a shower of information and new opportunities for your teacher's toolkit. When the dust settles, one question remains: "How do you incorporate the abundance of resources that the Internet brings?" The answers are as plentiful as the stars in the cosmos. But one way you can use the Internet is to take your students on a virtual field trip. Introducing the Internet doesn't mean you must forget everything you already know. Originally, the idea of field trips was as controversial as the Internet is now.

Imagine This: Creative Play and 21st-Century Learning I bought my six-year-old daughter a Black & Decker LI3100 Compact Lithium-Ion Rechargeable Screwdriver. I tell her it's critical for defending our Tampa, Florida neighborhood against the coming zombie apocalypse. Credit Rob van Nood and his design-thinking-heavy Tinker Camp in Portland, Oregon for the zombie angle. It's a brilliant mechanism for adding urgency and creative play to a curriculum straight out of the maker movement. White Oak teacher creates a Lego wall for her classroom A Coweta teacher is using her passion for Legos to bring more creativity to her students, by creating a Lego wall in her classroom. “I am always looking for innovative ways to engage students,” said Paula Corley, REACH teacher at White Oak Elementary School. “A few years ago, my passion for Legos was reignited with my own child and his interest. Then, I began teaching Lego robotics for the first time last year.

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum Learn more about the early years of rock and roll in the 1950s and 1960s and discover ways you can bring that history into your classroom, including lesson plans, listening guides, and exclusive content. is a teaching method where students learn and hone skills by working on a longer-term project in order to research and respond to complex challenges. The Education Department at the Rock and Roll Hall and Fame and Museum is proud to stream programming to bring the Museum into classrooms around the world virtually. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum's Digital Classroom provides teachers with classroom tools to explore the 1950s through thirteen key songs. Watch live streams recorded by Google Connected Classrooms that have been archived for your classroom use.

Homework vs. No Homework Is the Wrong Question The real question we should be asking is, "What do we believe should happen after the end of the school day to help ensure that students retain what they have learned and are primed to learn more?" Any answer with the word, "work" in its name, as in "homework," is not typically going to be met with eagerness or enthusiasm by students. Ideally, we want children to understand that they are always learners. In school, we refer to them as "students" but outside of school, as children, they are still learners.

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