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Image evolution

Image evolution
What is this? A simulated annealing like optimization algorithm, a reimplementation of Roger Alsing's excellent idea. The goal is to get an image represented as a collection of overlapping polygons of various colors and transparencies. We start from random 50 polygons that are invisible. In each optimization step we randomly modify one parameter (like color components or polygon vertices) and check whether such new variant looks more like the original image. If it is, we keep it, and continue to mutate this one instead. Fitness is a sum of pixel-by-pixel differences from the original image. This implementation is based on Roger Alsing's description, though not on his code. How does it look after some time? 50 polygons (4-vertex) ~15 minutes 644 benefitial mutations 6,120 candidates 88.74% fitness 50 polygons (6-vertex) ~15 minutes 646 benefitial mutations 6,024 candidates 89.04% fitness 50 polygons (10-vertex) ~15 minutes 645 benefitial mutations 5,367 candidates 87.01% fitness Requirements Related:  Unusual Finds

8 Artists Who Poured Their Heart and Soul Into Their Work (Also: Their Blood and Urine) All artists put a little bit of their soul into every piece. But these artists put their soul – and a whole lot more – into their art. 1. When Hananuma Masakichi learned he was dying of tuberculosis, he wanted to give his girlfriend a way to remember him. During the construction, Masakichi even sacrificed pieces of his own body to help his wooden doppelganger come to life. Masakichi finished his statue in 1885 and put it on display. When Robert Ripley began collecting the world's oddities in the 1930s, Masakichi's statue was one of the first items he acquired, paying a San Francisco saloon-owner $10 for it. 2. Van Gogh painted some famous self-portraits. The first Self was purchased by one of the Britart movement's biggest early supporters, Charles Saatchi, who paid £13,000 for it. 3. All artists suffer for their art, but Lani Beloso has made her suffering into art instead. 4. Few pieces of art have evoked emotions like Andres Serrano's 1987 Immersion (Piss Christ) . 5. 6. 7. 8.

Coda Popup Bubbles In particular, Jorge Mesa writes to ask how to re-create their ‘puff’ popup bubble shown when you mouse over the download image. In essence the effect is just a simple combination of effect, but there’s a few nuances to be wary of. How to Solve the Problem To create the puff popup bubble effect, we need the following: Markup that assumes that JavaScript is disabled. The biggest trick to be wary of is: when you move the mouse over the popup, this triggers a mouseout on the image used to trigger the popup being shown. I’ve provided a screencast to walk through how create this functionality. Watch the coda bubble screencast (alternative flash version) (QuickTime version is approx. 23Mb, flash version is streaming) View the demo and source code used in the screencast HTML Markup For the purpose of reusability, I’ve wrapped my ‘target’ and ‘popup’ in a div. There’s very little to the minimum required CSS. The minimum I recommend for the example is: jQuery Mouse Over Mouse Out The ‘Trick’

Virtual Pickett N909-ES SIMPLEX TRIG RULE with METRIC CONVERSION Slide Rule Simulated Pickett N909-ES Slide Rule [Instruction Sheet (jpg)][Explanation][Gallery Index][back to AntiQuark] [Copyright © 2005 Derek Ross] Top 50 Free Open Source Classes on Computer Science : Comtechtor Computer science is an interesting field to go into. There are a number of opportunities in computer science that you can take advantage of. With computers increasingly becoming a regular part of life, those who can work with computers have good opportunities. You can find a good salary with a program in computer science, and as long as you are careful to keep up your skills. Introduction to Computer Science Learn the basics of computer science, and get a foundation in how computer science works. Introduction to Computer Science: Learn about the history of computing, as well as the development of computer languages. Comprehensive Computer Science Collections If you are interested in courses that are a little more comprehensive in nature, you can get a good feel for computer science from the following collections: Programming and Languages Get a handle on computer programming, and learn about different computer languages used in programming. Computer Software Computer Processes and Data

The Running Man, Revisited Comparison between walking and running of mechanical energy expended. Credit: Daniel Lieberman Ann Trason, Scott Jurek, Matt Carpenter. These are the megastars of ultra-distance running, athletes who pound out not just marathons, but dozens of them back-to-back, over Rocky Mountain passes and across the scorching floor of Death Valley. But a handful of scientists think that these ultra-marathoners are using their bodies just as our hominid forbears once did, a theory known as the endurance running hypothesis (ER). Our toes, for instance, are shorter and stubbier than those of nearly all other primates, including chimpanzees, a trait that has long been attributed to our committed bipedalism. “If you have very long toes, the moment of force acting on the foot’s metatarsal phalangeal joint becomes problematic when running,” explains Lieberman. The paper earned the cover of Nature and generated quite a stir within bio/anthro circles. shoothead via Flickr

Ausweis Ausweis A Reality-Hacking Experiment. The world's changing. On a tape I bought at a yard sale, I heard the narrator say, "People are conditioned to believe the printed word." You know I really thought that people would laugh and not let me get anywhere with them. But success came really quickly. My next big success came with the "50 Cents Off" card. What was it that compelled him? Of course, there's the story of the artist who paints replicas of U.S. currency to prove some of the same point. I started to get obsessed with how abstract and far-reaching I could make the words on the card...could they really overcome physical limitations? And why do these cards make everyone smile? I made the "Add To Your Family Card," after I realized most of the previous ones were rather masculine. A little further in the "far-reaching" direction... Trying to restore some balance to the noise most of these create. Another powermad one. Just how absurd can we make this?! Ninja-style... poof! Links

15 Awesome Free JavaScript Charts / JavaScripts / Splashnology - Web Design and Web Technology Community inShare11 Plotting your data can serve as a replacement to tabular data, and is also a great way to add practical graphics to your web page or application. There are many ways you can plot data, but here I have included 15 Awesome Free JavaScript Charts In Your Sites/Blog Pages which serves as a easy Charting solution. Hope you like it. FusionCharts – Delightful JavaScript Charts for your web & mobile apps FusionCharts Suite XT gives you delightful JavaScript charts that work across devices and platforms. Website: Trial: RGraph: HTML5 & Javascript charts for your website RGraph is a charts library written in Javascript that uses HTML5 to draw and supports over twenty different types of charts. RGraph is free to use on non-commercial websites such as personal blogs, educational or charity sites. Some of the features of RGraph: TufteGraph Advertisement Highcharts Flot

Jet Propulsion I’ve grudgingly included this section by popular request. Rocket and turbojet engines are fabulous technological achievements—but they’re so simple that the animations are boring! At least I think so. You be the judge! Rocket The rocket engine is the simplest of this family, so we’ll start there. In order to work in outer space, rocket engines must carry their own supply of oxygen as well as fuel. To test this principle yourself, inflate a toy balloon and release it without tying it off…rocket propulsion at its simplest. Turbojet The turbojet employs the same principle as the rocket, except that it burns oxygen from the atmosphere instead of carrying its own supply. Notice the similarities: Fuel continuously burns inside a combustion chamber just like the rocket. Now the differences: On its way out the nozzle, some of the gas pressure is used to drive a turbine. At the front of the engine, the turbine shaft drives a compressor. Turboprop Turbofan

Ada Lovelace Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace (10 December 1815 – 27 November 1852), born Augusta Ada Byron and now commonly known as Ada Lovelace, was an English mathematician and writer chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage's early mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. Her notes on the engine include what is recognised as the first algorithm intended to be carried out by a machine. Because of this, she is often described as the world's first computer programmer.[1][2][3] Ada described her approach as "poetical science" and herself as an "Analyst (& Metaphysician)". As a young adult, her mathematical talents led her to an ongoing working relationship and friendship with fellow British mathematician Charles Babbage, and in particular Babbage's work on the Analytical Engine. Biography[edit] Childhood[edit] Ada, aged four On 16 January 1816, Annabella, at George's behest, left for her parents' home at Kirkby Mallory taking one-month-old Ada with her. Adult years[edit]

Psychology Today: Ten Politically Incorrect Truths About Human Nature Human nature is one of those things that everybody talks about but no one can define precisely. Every time we fall in love, fight with our spouse, get upset about the influx of immigrants into our country, or go to church, we are, in part, behaving as a human animal with our own unique evolved nature—human nature. This means two things. First, our thoughts, feelings, and behavior are produced not only by our individual experiences and environment in our own lifetime but also by what happened to our ancestors millions of years ago. Second, our thoughts, feelings, and behavior are shared, to a large extent, by all men or women, despite seemingly large cultural differences. Human behavior is a product both of our innate human nature and of our individual experience and environment. The implications of some of the ideas in this article may seem immoral, contrary to our ideals, or offensive. Why Beautiful People Have More Daughters,

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