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Image evolution

Image evolution
What is this? A simulated annealing like optimization algorithm, a reimplementation of Roger Alsing's excellent idea. The goal is to get an image represented as a collection of overlapping polygons of various colors and transparencies. We start from random 50 polygons that are invisible. In each optimization step we randomly modify one parameter (like color components or polygon vertices) and check whether such new variant looks more like the original image. If it is, we keep it, and continue to mutate this one instead. Fitness is a sum of pixel-by-pixel differences from the original image. This implementation is based on Roger Alsing's description, though not on his code. How does it look after some time? 50 polygons (4-vertex) ~15 minutes 644 benefitial mutations 6,120 candidates 88.74% fitness 50 polygons (6-vertex) ~15 minutes 646 benefitial mutations 6,024 candidates 89.04% fitness 50 polygons (10-vertex) ~15 minutes 645 benefitial mutations 5,367 candidates 87.01% fitness Requirements Related:  Unusual Finds

8 Artists Who Poured Their Heart and Soul Into Their Work (Also: Their Blood and Urine) All artists put a little bit of their soul into every piece. But these artists put their soul – and a whole lot more – into their art. 1. When Hananuma Masakichi learned he was dying of tuberculosis, he wanted to give his girlfriend a way to remember him. During the construction, Masakichi even sacrificed pieces of his own body to help his wooden doppelganger come to life. Masakichi finished his statue in 1885 and put it on display. When Robert Ripley began collecting the world's oddities in the 1930s, Masakichi's statue was one of the first items he acquired, paying a San Francisco saloon-owner $10 for it. 2. Van Gogh painted some famous self-portraits. The first Self was purchased by one of the Britart movement's biggest early supporters, Charles Saatchi, who paid £13,000 for it. 3. All artists suffer for their art, but Lani Beloso has made her suffering into art instead. 4. Few pieces of art have evoked emotions like Andres Serrano's 1987 Immersion (Piss Christ) . 5. 6. 7. 8.

Ausweis Ausweis A Reality-Hacking Experiment. The world's changing. On a tape I bought at a yard sale, I heard the narrator say, "People are conditioned to believe the printed word." You know I really thought that people would laugh and not let me get anywhere with them. But success came really quickly. My next big success came with the "50 Cents Off" card. What was it that compelled him? Of course, there's the story of the artist who paints replicas of U.S. currency to prove some of the same point. I started to get obsessed with how abstract and far-reaching I could make the words on the card...could they really overcome physical limitations? And why do these cards make everyone smile? I made the "Add To Your Family Card," after I realized most of the previous ones were rather masculine. A little further in the "far-reaching" direction... Trying to restore some balance to the noise most of these create. Another powermad one. Just how absurd can we make this?! Ninja-style... poof! Links

Ghost Quiz In 1885, Cecilia Garrett Smith and a friend were experimenting with automatic writing using a primitive Ouija board on which a planchette was guided by a visiting “spirit.” “We got all sorts of nonsense out of it, sometimes long doggerel rhymes with several verses,” but the prophecies they asked for were rarely answered. When they asked who the guiding spirit was, the planchette wrote that his name was Jim and that he had been Senior Wrangler at Cambridge. Intrigued, they asked Jim to write the equation describing the heart-shaped planchette they were using, and they received this response: This they interpreted as , which J.W. “I am quite sure that I had never seen the curve before, and therefore the production of the equation could not have been an act of unconscious memory on my part,” Smith wrote later. One wonders what Jim thought of all this.

Surfing The Apocalypse FEBRUARY 2000 The following item was placed for sale to the highest bidder at the online auction site Ebay. A SURFING THE APOCALYPSE exclusive interview with the new owner of the painting can be found following the copy of the ad. Here is the unedited text of the original ad. Photos that appeared in the ad are also included but have been resized/positioned to fit the page. They do appear in the original order This auction is nearing the end. The Original Ad Can Be Viewed HERE Until Ebay Ceases To Archive It. SURFING THE APOCALYPSE followed up on this story in an email interview with the new owner of the painting. SURFING: What attracted you to the "Haunted Painting?" L.B.: Visually, it seemed like a good composition, the artist displayed a certain professional handling of the medium, and the subject matter was compelling. SURFING: How long have you had the painting? L.B.: Since March 7. SURFING: Has anything "unusual" happened with the painting? L.B.: Yes. March 12, 2000 Giclée on canvas.

“Did you know that stones bleed?” Journey in the mysterious world of Pino Sciola Pino Sciola stone museum “What is the first word that comes to your mind when you think of a stone?” Asked me Pino Sciola welcoming me to his house-lab. “Hard? Rigid?” “What about elastic?” This is how my interview with the acclaimed sculptor who makes sound out of stones started. Pino Sciola in his open-air museum in San Sperate Pinuccio Sciola, as he’s known among his fellow countrymen of the colorful town of San Sperate, in southern Sardinia, is an all-round artist, but his soul lies in the mysterious world of stones: “Stones are the backbone of our planet, they were here since time began, over the span of millennia, and they will never cease to exist.” As Confucius already in the 6th century BC praised the importance of harmony between people and nature, today he would have been very pleased to see that Sciola has towards stones the same conception of Chinese ancient culture: they are a gift from Nature to us, and we must cherish them. Pino Sciola sounding stones “Ah, geologists!”

Time Warp Wives: Meet the women who really do live in the past By Diana Appleyard Updated: 09:06 GMT, 8 August 2008 The credit crunch, a knife crime epidemic - no wonder so many of us are sick of the 21st century. 1950s Joanne Massey, 35, lives in a recreation of a 1950s home in Stafford with her husband Kevin, 42, who works as a graphics application designer. I love nothing better than fastening my pinny round my waist and baking a cake for Kevin in my 1950s kitchen. I put on some lovely Frank Sinatra music and am completely lost in my own little fantasy world. Enlarge Joanne Massey: 'Living like this makes me happier' We've been married for 13 years and we're extremely happy because we both know our roles. What's wrong with wanting to be adored and spoiled? I don't even put petrol in our Ford Anglia car, which is 43 years old, because I think that is so unladylike. I make sure our home is immaculate, there is dinner on the table, and I look pretty to welcome my husband home. They had it in their garage to keep tools in, so it needed renovation. 1940s

The most beautiful suicide On May 1, 1947, Evelyn McHale leapt to her death from the observation deck of the Empire State Building. Photographer Robert Wiles took a photo of McHale a few minutes after her death. The photo ran a couple of weeks later in Life magazine accompanied by the following caption: On May Day, just after leaving her fiancé, 23-year-old Evelyn McHale wrote a note. 'He is much better off without me ... From McHale's NY Times obituary, Empire State Ends Life of Girl, 20: At 10:40 A. The serenity of McHale's body amidst the crumpled wreckage it caused is astounding. Update: Here's a better photo of Warhol's print. Update: Here's the page as it appeared in Life Magazine. Update: Codex 99 did some research on McHale and her activities on the day she died.

Public Art Concepts - Dan Sternof Beyer 2011 Download the PDF of these ideas : Public Art Concepts - Dan Sternof Beyer 2011 (2mb) [ New American Public Art ] How to Get a Copy of Your FBI File (idea) by narzos The Freedom of Information Act is a powerful thing. If you've ever wanted to know just what those guvmint bastards have on you, anyway, here's your chance. Just fill in the italics in this form letter with the appropriate information, get your signature notarized, send it off, and you're in business! This should be free, though if your search returns reams of information, you may be charged 5 cents per page in duplication fees. Your Name Today's Date Your Address Line 2 of Your Address Federal Bureau of Investigation Records Resources Division - Attn.: FOIA/PA Office J. This is a request for records under both the Privacy Act and the Freedom of Information Act. My full name is: Your Name. FOIA/PA statutes provide that even if some of the requested material is properly exempt from mandatory disclosure, all segregable portions must be released. I hereby agree to pay reasonable costs associated with this request up to a maximum of $30. Sincerely,Your Signature Your Printed Name

Cool Abandoned Places In The World 8 - Glorious Mind Posted by admin on 10 Dec 2012 / 2 Comments Cool Abandoned Places In The World -Part 8 :Varosha In the early 1970’s, the Varosha quarter in Famagusta, Cyprus was one of the Mediterranean’s most popular and glamorous tourist destinations. The bright blue waters and beautiful sandy beaches were draws for such stars as Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton, Raquel Welch, and Brigitte Bardot. Population of the area grew to about 39,000 people, but by the end of 1974 the town would be conquered by Turkish troops, fenced off completely, and have a population of zero. The island of Cyprus has been the subject of a constant tug-of-war battle between Greece and Turkey for centuries. Homes still have closets full of clothes, cabinets full of dishes, and there is even a car dealership still stocked with ‘brand new’ 1974 model-year cars. So why is the area still barricaded and patrolled by Turkish troops? Varosha in its heyday:

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