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Do rewards, punishment work?

Do rewards, punishment work?
In an experiment, children’s brains reacted strongly to positive feedback and scarcely responded at all to negative feedback. Our basic strategy for raising children or teaching students is a reward and punishment strategy. We are what we believe we are - C.S. Lewis From an early age we introduce Santa Claus, who carefully observes what children do and appears from the heavens to deliver gifts for the ‘good ones’ or to punish the ‘bad ones’. While manipulating children with incentives seems to work in the short run, it is a strategy that ultimately fails. Praise is frequently a judgement and a kind of bribe as the child must ‘earn’ points by doing the ‘right’ thing. Punishment causes either physical, emotional, or social pain, and it is often followed with confusion, anger, or guilt. The younger children’s performance improved substantially more when the feedback was positive. C.S. Our mind is responsible for all sorts of illusions. We might even become what we pretend to be.

http://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20130106/education/Do-rewards-punishment-work-.452218

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Arts make students smart When children are physically active and creative, they tend to focus better and work more enthusiastically with the rest of the curriculum. Arts, sport, music and drama are often viewed as fun extra-curricular activities for children but are given less importance compared with core subjects such as English, science, or mathematics. The arts should be taken seriously as a source of inspiration, as a way of life - Nataša Pantović

Conscious Parenting and Kids Happiness Interview with Nataša Pantović Nuit Author of Conscious Parenting: Mindful Living Course for Parents Q. You say that the parenting is the most difficult job in the world. Why? A. The art of parenting is extremely complicated.

Create freedom in the learning environment Allow your child to cook, wash dishes, and take care of plants and animals. These activities are extremely interesting for children because they can act as grown-ups. A child has a deep longing to discover that the world is based on truth. Respect that longing. In our attempt to help children grow into inspired adults, we wish them to carry the youthfulness of their souls and the wonders of childhood into their old age.

Education of the future In a typical classroom in Finland, students work in small groups. The teacher nurtures independence and active learning, allowing them to develop skills to understand and solve problems. “You may give them your love but not your thoughts, for they have their own thoughts. You may house their bodies but not their souls, for their souls dwell in the house of tomorrow, which you cannot visit, not even in your dreams. Tapping the brain’s magic With traditional educational methods – its curriculum and its focus on examinations – students quickly lose motivation and interest for science and its magic. The human brain is truly extraordinary. A healthy brain has some 200 billion neurons.

Divergent thinking Musicians are more likely to use both hemispheres of their brain and more likely to use divergent thinking in their thought processes. Divergent thinking is essential for creativity. It is the ability to see lots of possible ways to interpret a question and lots of possible answers to it. It is important to vary thought processes so that children use both convergent and divergent thinking - Natasa Pantovic It is a thought process used to generate creative ideas by exploring many possibilities.

Conscious Relationships [Article]: What is Unconditional Love? Relationships, Spiritual Development, Mindfulness Articles What is Unconditional Love? Unconditional Love and Happiness The essence of this wonderful feeling, this joyful state of being is that openess to Love can and must be trained! To choose Happiness as the way of Life, one needs to train Love... The Soul that choses the path of developing virtues becomes intoxicated with good qualities, and it starts fully and deeply loving and trusting, living within this space of openness, living within the space of Being Love.

Will we learn from Finland? Finland’s no-national-exams policy goes against the trend of competition, standardisation, testing and control. One of the unfortunate limitations of test-oriented education is that if children pass their school tests, they are considered winners; otherwise, they are viewed as losers and this classification is engraved in their minds at a very young age. Finland has succeeded in creating a generation of inspired and outstanding students Shifting education goals Education should teach children how to ask appropriate questions, how to analyse a problem, stimulate a desire to learn, and flexibility to consider different points of view. One of the biggest problems of education today is that the ‘factory model’ of teaching: the top-down approach and the rewards-and-punishments ap­proach, limit students’ ability to contribute with their imagination and creativity. In the Finnish educational model, active learning is taken seriously. Schoolchildren do not sit at their desks memorising

Nordic countries’ teaching methods reaping rewards Unesco statistics of tertiary education enrollment by country show that while 21.5 per cent of Maltese students successfully enrol into university each year, 70 per cent of the students in Nordic countries continuing their education after secondary school. Nordic countries use techniques and tools that encourage collaboration - Nataša Pantovic Comparing the Nordic countries (Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Finland) with other EU countries, the difference clearly stands out.

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