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Mnemonic major system

Mnemonic major system
The Major System (also called the phonetic number system, phonetic mnemonic system, or Herigone's mnemonic system) is a mnemonic technique used to aid in memorizing numbers. The system works by converting numbers into consonant sounds, then into words by adding vowels. The system works on the principle that images can be remembered more easily than numbers. The system[edit] Each numeral is associated with one or more consonants. Vowels and the consonants w, h, and y are ignored. The groups of similar sounds and the rules for applying the mappings are almost always fixed, but other hooks and mappings can be used as long as the person using the system can remember them and apply them consistently. Each numeral maps to a set of similar sounds with similar mouth and tongue positions. For most people it would be easier to remember 3.1415927 (an approximation of the mathematical constant pi) as: Whilst this is unwieldy at first, with practice it can become a very effective technique. Other[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mnemonic_major_system

Related:  Major system for remembering numbersTerapia sistémicaSelf Actualization

Maintenance mode Using memory techniques can get complicated when you want to memorize a lot of different information. Memory godfather Tony Buzan came up with the idea of putting your major system into a matrix and stretching it that way up to 10.000 combinations. Frank Gazerro is making his debut as an author for Memory-Sports.com by writing this article for you. Bardo Thodol The Bardo Thodol (Tibetan: བར་དོ་ཐོས་གྲོལ, Wylie: bar do thos grol), "Liberation Through Hearing During the Intermediate State", is a text from a larger corpus of teachings, the "Profound Dharma of Self-Liberation through the Intention of the Peaceful and Wrathful Ones",[note 1] revealed by Karma Lingpa (1326–1386). It is the best-known work of Nyingma literature, being known in the west as the Tibetan Book of the Dead. §Etymology[edit]

Mnemonic dominic system The mnemonic dominic system is a mnemonic system used to remember sequences of digits similar to the mnemonic major system. It was invented and used in competition by eight-time World Memory Champion Dominic O'Brien.[1] Differences from the major system[edit] Mnemonics and memory improvement / Pegging and memory The system of pegging that I will be outlining over the course of the next few pages, is one of the most important techniques that has so far been developed in the field of Mnemonics, since the discipline was first practised during the time of the ancient Greeks. Second only to the system of linking in its overall usefulness. A version of pegging was first put forward by a man named Stanislaus Mink von Wennsshein, around the year 1648. Since then the technique has been modified extensively by a number of researchers in the field. Notably by the Englishman Dr Richard Gray, in the year 1730. In more recent times the memory experts Harry Lorayne and Tony Buzan, amongst others, have modified the system further.

George Gurdjieff George Ivanovich Gurdjieff /ˈɡɜrdʒiˌɛf/ (January 13, 1866-1877?)[1]|- October 29, 1949), also commonly referred to as Georges Ivanovich Gurdjieff and G. I. Gurdjieff, was an influential spiritual teacher of the early to mid-20th century who taught that most humans live their lives in a state of hypnotic "waking sleep", but that it is possible to transcend to a higher state of consciousness and achieve full human potential. Memory Techniques, Memorization Tips - The Journey Method Home :: academic tips :: memory techniques :: the journey method The Journey Method The journey method is a powerful, flexible and effective mnemonic based around the idea of remembering landmarks on a well-known journey. In many ways it combines the narrative flow of the Link Method and the structure and order of the Peg Systems into one highly effective mnemonic. Because the journey method uses routes that you know well, you can code information to be remembered to a large number of easily visualised or remembered landmarks along the routes. Because you know what these landmarks look like, you need not work out visualisations for them!

Remembering Numbers - The Phonetic Number System to Easily Memorize Numbers Remembering numbers is hard. But if you want to build a great memory, you need a way to memorize them. Fortunately, there is a memory trick you can use for long numbers. It's called the Phonetic Number system (or Major system). It was developed over 300 years ago and is one of the most powerful of the memory systems that use imagination and association. Why is remembering numbers important? Sleep medicine Sleep medicine is a medical specialty or subspecialty devoted to the diagnosis and therapy of sleep disturbances and disorders. From the middle of the 20th century, research has provided increasing knowledge and answered many questions about sleep-wake functioning.[1] The rapidly evolving field[2] has become a recognized medical subspecialty in some countries. Dental sleep medicine also qualifies for board certification in some countries. Properly organized, minimum 12-month, postgraduate training programs are still being defined in the United States.[3][4] In some countries, the sleep researchers and the physicians who treat patients may be the same people. The first sleep clinics in the United States were established in the 1970s by interested physicians and technicians; the study, diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea were their first tasks. As late as 1999, virtually any American physician, with no specific training in sleep medicine, could open a sleep laboratory.[5]

Memory Techniques, Memorization Tips - The Alphabet System Home :: academic tips :: memory techniques :: the alphabet system The Alphabet System The Alphabet system is a peg memory technique similar to, but more sophisticated than, the Number/Rhyme system. Remember Any Number With the Major Memory System Did you ever want to be able to recite pi up to 22,500 decimal digits? As for me, I never felt attracted to that sort of stuff. But remembering phone numbers, passwords, PINs, birthdays and all sorts of everyday numbers — that’s something I resonate with! Meet the Major memory system, one of the most powerful techniques around for memorizing numbers. If you think you could use a boost to your memory, or just want to jog your brain a little, here’s a great way to do it. Jay Haley Jay Haley Jay Douglas Haley (July 19, 1923 – February 13, 2007)[1] was one of the founding figures of brief and family therapy in general and of the strategic model of psychotherapy, and he was one of the more accomplished teachers, clinical supervisors, and authors in these disciplines.[2][3] Life and works[edit] Haley was born at his family's homestead in Midwest, Wyoming. His family moved to Berkeley, California when he was 4.

Brain fitness The term brain fitness reflects a hypothesis that cognitive abilities can be maintained or improved by exercising the brain, in analogy to the way physical fitness is improved by exercising the body. Although there is strong evidence that aspects of brain structure remain plastic throughout life, and that high levels of mental activity are associated with reduced risks of age-related dementia, scientific support for the concept of "brain fitness" is limited. The term is virtually never used in the scientific literature, but is commonly used in the context of self-help books and commercial products.[1] It first came into play in the 1980s, and appeared in the titles of self-help books in 1989[2] and 1990.[3] §Overview[edit] Brain fitness can be measured physically at the cellular level by neurogenesis, the creation of new neurons, and increased functional connections of synapses and dendrites between neurons.

An Ecology Of Mind An Ecology of Mind is a film portrait of Gregory Bateson, celebrated anthropologist, philosopher, author, naturalist, systems theorist, and filmmaker, produced and directed by his daughter, Nora Bateson. The film includes footage from Bateson’s own films shot in the 1930s in Bali (with Margaret Mead) and New Guinea, along with photographs, filmed lectures, and interviews. His youngest child, Nora, depicts him as a man who studied the interrelationships of the complex systems in which we live with a depth motivated by scientific rigor and caring integrity. Nora Bateson’s rediscovery of his work documents the vast – and continuing – influence Bateson’s thinking has had on the work of an amazingly wide range of disciplines. Through contemporary interviews, along with his own words, Bateson’s way of thinking reveals practical approaches to the enormous challenges confronting the human race and the natural world.

Smoking cessation Smoking cessation (colloquially quitting smoking) is the process of discontinuing tobacco smoking. Tobacco contains nicotine, which is addictive,[1] making the process of quitting often very prolonged and difficult. Smoking cessation can be achieved with or without assistance from healthcare professionals, or the use of medications. However, a combination of personal efforts and medications proves more effective to many smokers.[2] Methods that have been found to be effective include interventions directed at or via health care providers and health care systems; medications including nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) and varenicline; individual and group counselling.

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