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Board Game Design First Steps

Board Game Design First Steps
Related:  Game Design Theory: Game-play Experience

[Mind-Speak] » Blog Archive » Project Aurora – Creating the Concept If you’re like me, you love seeing how other people design. Here’s the process – and the docs – from the first stages of development on my latest indie endeavor: Project Aurora. The Spark The idea for Project Aurora came up accidentally, the result of experimental concepting for Project Babies. Armed with a rainbow glitter texture and some semi-transparent white hills, I was in the middle of making background sprites when I had one of those awesome perceptual shifts. It wasn’t happy rainbow hills – it was the aurora borealis amongst the stars, casting bright spectrums on the snow. At that point, it was an aesthetic – there were no mechanics, nothing beyond the look, but I loved it. The Core One of the rare times I literally “dreamt this up”. At this point, the idea was still in “bright light” stage: it was vivid and pulsing with potential, but if I looked right at it with a critical eye I’d wind up blind and stumbling until I extinguished it. Curiosity – what is this world? The Feel

Game Design Process 101: Part II (Creative Thinking) For many people who want to be Game Designers, the most difficult thing about the process, aside from the actual work, follows soon after the initial spark of inspiration strikes. More often than not, the first mistake a budding developer makes is to get inspired and immediate start the execution of the game’s design, usually after slapping together a whole lot of hype to get other people interested in his or her project. Screenshots, like an actual plan, are optional. A great example would be GamerJoe21 taking a shower, thinking about the ‘kick-ass war movie’ he saw last night where ‘that dude did that awesome thing with that minigun’. Don’t laugh, it’s probably happened numerous times… Unfortunately, for a game to be the best it can be, there must be some amount of planning and preparation. “But wait! So the question is not what your game will be about, for you’ve already satisfied that in the first part of the Game Design Process, namely inspiration. Whew.

How to Change the Reputation of Your Business A business’s reputation often dictates its sales. A bad reputation leads to a lack of willingness on the part of the consumer to purchase a product or service from the business. You don’t need to trash your business and start a new one to rebuild your reputation; confronting the problem that has led to your company’s poor reputation will result in people returning to your business. As long as you’re prepared to make changes to the way your business operates, a positive reputation will follow. Step 1 Determine the cause of your business’s poor reputation. Step 2 Announce any changes that you’ve made. Related Reading: 10-Step Process of Business Change Step 3 Focus on the customer. Step 4 Volunteer in the community. Step 5 Ask customers for their opinion about your business. Step 6 Train your staff. About the Author Located in Pittsburgh, Chris Miksen has been writing instructional articles on a wide range of topics for online publications since 2007. Have Feedback?

My design method: Interweaving « #AltDevBlogADay Warning: there might be a couple of light spoilers, but everything is in the trailers anyway so… nevermind that. I hope what I’m going to say won’t sound too stupid, agreeing with everybody and not making a fool of myself is really hard. n_n That being said: DON’T duct-tape features together to make Frankenstein-style abominations.DO find natural sources of gameplay/setting harmony and consistency.DO identify the axes from which your game is built in order to know what you should and shouldn’t do (it also works for other forms of intellectual construction). Interweaving This has been my main design paradigm and method for the past year. There are 4 main axes that need to be taken into account when using this model: Perimeter, Exploitation, Justification, and Legitimacy. Simply put: find a nice place to dig (like a goldmine), and DIG deep, don’t just scratch the surface. I realized later that that described very precisely what QUALITY is about. Let me explain. Perimeter I’ll use examples: Portal:

Visualizing the Creative Process As I coach new developers, I've taken to scribbling out the same useful diagram for visualizing the creative process again and again on coffee-ringed napkins. In order to limit my future abuse of culinary paper wares, I've reproduced my images in a more formal fashion in this essay. The conversation usually starts with the following statement: "Creativity is like a snake swallowing a series of tennis balls." And when confused looks inevitably result, I sketch some variant of this odd little picture: Using this as a starting point, we start chatting about joys and pitfalls of creativity.The Brainstorming PhaseFailures in brainstormingThe Culling PhaseFailures in cullingCyclingFailures in cycling The Brainstorming Phase We all start with an idea. Brainstorming starts out small and expands over time There are several activities that occur during this phase:Ideas: Generate new ideas related to your initial insight. A multitude of experiments arise during brainstorming Problems with brainstorming

Social Networking Risks for Corporations By Carl Timm The rapid explosion of social networking is starting to affect corporations. Believe it or not, employee use of social networking sites while at work isn’t the only reason corporations are running into problems; corporations themselves have started using social networking sites for a multitude of reasons, such as marketing, employee communications, and emergency response services, just to name a few. The reliance on social networking use has introduced some serious vulnerability issues for these corporations. Below is a list of some of the vulnerabilities corporations are now facing: Identity Theft Data Leakage Legal Cyber Bullying Discrimination Reputation Damage Internet Threats Attackers love using social networking sites to steal people’s identities. Data leakage introduces a serious risk for companies. Legal ramifications are an often overlooked risk that corporations face when employees post to their social networking sites while at work.

Triple Town Beta (Now with Bears) Exciting times. You can now play our puzzle game Triple Town in your web browser. We are releasing it as a beta and the game should evolve quite substantially over time. Huge kudos to Cristian Soulos for making this project blossom after a long winter. Triple Town is a special game. On the surface, it is a simple match-3 variant, but after a few games you'll start noticing the strategic depth. The big addition for this release? Bears, bears everywhere Triple Town helped solidify how I construct the world and setting in my games. (You can read a bit more on the theory of how games are unique suited to creating emotional experiences in my previous essay on Shadow Emotions and Primary Emotions. Tuning emotions When I revisited the Triple Town design, the emotions were already clearly evident. Emotions are complex to say the least so we need some sort of entry into the topic. There are a variety of theories. Monsters or children? Consider a very basic example of labeling in Triple Town.

Risk and Reward Deluxe « #AltDevBlogADay I recently came across a quote from Cliff Bleszinski (source forgotten) where he contemplated that he’d rather have other game designers ripping off Gears of War’s “active reload” mechanic than its cover-based shooting. Reading that, I was reminded of an observation that my friend and colleague Peter once had while we were playing Wii Tennis together. We were pretty good players, having played that game daily during our lunch break for months. And we finally understood the finesse, the genius, of the service in Wii Tennis. The service in Wii Tennis works like this: First, you waggle the Wii Remote to throw the ball into the air. Then you make a racket swing-like gesture with the remote in order to hit the ball. While the power serve is played by throwing the ball into the air and hitting it with the bat when it has reached its peak, the lulu-service needs the player to hit the ball moments before the Mii catches the ball again with his hand.

The Change Game: Engaging Exercises to Teach Change J. DeLayne Stroud February 26, 2010 Successful initial implementation and ongoing maintenance of process improvements requires overcoming the resistance to change. Green Belts are change agents who need to recognize, understand and interpret resistance to change and develop skills to manage it effectively. Managing change resistance is often covered in training, yet a primary learning issue facing most organizations is the lack of engagement and motivation in lecture-based training. By using simulations, exercises or games, practitioners can enliven their learning environments and improve knowledge retention, skills and applications. Games are a great way to illustrate teaching concepts for several reasons. The following exercises and games were designed to increase participant understanding of the emotional barriers that are part of resistance and how to deal with them. Change Game 1: Cross Your Arms Duration: 5 minutes Number of participants: unlimited Materials required: none

July 2011 Not all emotions are created equal. Consider: It is a distinctly different thing to feel sad while reading about a dying mother than to actually feel sad because your mother is dying. The former is a shadowy reflection that we intuitively understand is not immediately threatening. The later is raw, primary and life changing. I've yet to see existing terminology for this phenomena, so at the risk of stepping on existing toes, let's use the following labels. Shadow emotions: The emotions we feel when partaking in narratives, art and other safely evocative stimuliPrimary emotions: The emotions we feel when we are in a situation with real perceived consequences. "When we make decisions, we must assess the incentive value of the choices available to us, using cognitive and emotional processes. Crucially, the theory identify two distinct classes of emotion. Brief thoughts on memory and emotion A small bit of background is necessary to describe the mechanism of shadow emotions. Shadow Emotions

4 Powerful Game Development Tools | Gameplay Passion September 20th, 2012 When making a game, you want to : Work efficiently and quicklyEasily organize and keep track of your ideasSee your game in action as soon as possibleEasily test if the final product matches to your Game Design In this article, I present 4 powerful game development tools that you can use to achieve the 4 goals stated above. 1) Game Design document (GDD) Update 23/03/2013 : some of my ideas here about game design documents may be outdated, check this article for more up-to-date ideas. When a game is born, it comes to the world in the form of a piece of paper or a word document called Game Design Document A Game Design Document describes EVERY feature of your game in a precise, clear and detailed way. Every detail should be there, no exception. When I started game development a few years ago, I made very incomplete or no GDDs at all. By neglecting to maintain a GDD, I was off-topic most of the time. The quickest way to develop a game is to imagine it first. 2) Dev Journal

How to Change the Reputation of Your Business A business’s reputation often dictates its sales. A bad reputation leads to a lack of willingness on the part of the consumer to purchase a product or service from the business. You don’t need to trash your business and start a new one to rebuild your reputation; confronting the problem that has led to your company’s poor reputation will result in people returning to your business. Step 1 Determine the cause of your business’s poor reputation. Step 2 Announce any changes that you’ve made. Related Reading: 10-Step Process of Business Change Step 3 Focus on the customer. Step 4 Volunteer in the community. Step 5 Ask customers for their opinion about your business. Step 6 Train your staff. About the Author Located in Pittsburgh, Chris Miksen has been writing instructional articles on a wide range of topics for online publications since 2007. Have Feedback? Thank you for providing feedback to our Editorial staff on this article.

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