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Open access

Open access
Open access logo, originally designed by Public Library of Science. Whilst no official open access logo exists, organisations are free to select the logo style that best supports their visual language. Other logos are also in use. 9-minute video explaining open access Open access (OA) refers to online research outputs that are free of all restrictions on access (e.g. access tolls) and free of many restrictions on use (e.g. certain copyright and license restrictions).[1] Open access can be applied to all forms of published research output, including peer-reviewed and non peer-reviewed academic journal articles, conference papers, theses,[2] book chapters,[1] and monographs.[3] Definitions[edit] On the occasion of the tenth anniversary of the Budapest Open Access Initiative in 2012, Peter Suber is interviewed about his views on past, present and future developments in open access to scholarly publications The Budapest statement defined open access as follows: Gratis and libre OA[edit]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_access

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Open Access The Case for Open Access Open Access (OA) stands for unrestricted access and unrestricted reuse. Here’s why that matters. Global Open Access Portal The Global Open Access Portal (GOAP), funded by the Governments of Colombia, Denmark, Norway, and the United States Department of State, presents a current snapshot of the status of Open Access (OA) to scientific information around the world. For countries that have been more successful implementing Open Access, the portal highlights critical success factors and aspects of the enabling environment. For countries and regions that are still in the early stages of Open Access development, the portal identifies key players, potential barriers and opportunities.

Facilitating access to free online resources: challenges and opportunities for the library community A white paper from Taylor & Francis “While we understand that the questions we posed encompassed a world of free-to-view material beyond the traditional book and journal content that is normally associated with the offerings of major scientific, scholarly and professional publishers, we nevertheless are acutely aware that there are key roles that we need to perform and a whole range of new services and products that we should look to develop. All key stakeholders in the information and research communication worlds are aware that ‘free’ does not mean cost-free. However, free-to-access and free-to-view, with free content availability in models such as ‘freemium offerings’, are among the paths towards global access that we are all now embracing and experimenting with.” Dr David Green, Global Journals Publishing Director We at Taylor & Francis wanted to conduct a research programme to help explore the issues relating to free content discoverability from the perspective of librarians.

Why librarians should be concerned with Open Access Rapid price escalations in scholarly journal subscription rates have been adversely affecting access to scholarly information. Often referred to as the 'serials pricing crisis', the costs of academic journals have been sharply climbing for over two decades now. According to the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), the average cost of a serial subscription for ARL member libraries increased by 315% from 1989 to 2003. This increase far exceeds the rise in the Consumer Price Index of 68% for those years.

Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching Return to MERLOT II Home Page Search all MERLOT Select to go to your profile Click to expand login or register menu Select to go to your workspace From Crowdfunding To Open Access, Startups Are Experimenting With Academic Research These days may well be the next golden age for universities, and startups are leading the way. For institutions that can feel much like their counterparts from a thousand years ago, universities have witnessed breathtaking change in just a handful of years. The development of Massive Open Online Courses by startups like Udacity, Coursera, and others have forced many staid university administrators to consider how technology can transform higher education, particularly in the dissemination of educational content.

Taylor & Francis Author Services - Taylor & Francis open access program Skip to navigation Taylor & Francis has been publishing academic research since 1798 and on an open access basis since 2006. We offer a broad range of author options, enabling authors to publish their material in quality open access journals with a high degree of peer review integrity. How do I benefit? Publishing in a Taylor & Francis Open and Routledge Open journal ensures: UK wide survey of academics spotlights researchers’ reliance on open access London and New York – A major survey of UK Academics released today examines the attitudes of researchers and practitioners working within higher education and sheds light on their behaviours, including their reliance on digital technologies, the Internet and open access. The survey, funded and guided by Jisc and RLUK and conducted on their behalf by the not-for-profit research organisation Ithaka S+R, received 3,498 responses, (a response rate of 7.9%). The survey covered a range of areas from how academics discover and stay abreast of research, to their teaching of undergraduates and from how they choose research topics and publication channels, to their views on learned societies and university libraries and their collections. The overarching themes across these areas are increasing reliance on the Internet for their research and publishing activities, and the strong role that openness is playing in their work.

8,200+ Strong, Researchers Band Together To Force Science Journals To Open Access Evolutionary biologist Michael Eisen made this t-shirt design in support of the Elsevier boycott. Academic research is behind bars and an online boycott by 8,209 researchers (and counting) is seeking to set it free…well, more free than it has been. The boycott targets Elsevier, the publisher of popular journals like Cell and The Lancet, for its aggressive business practices, but opposition was electrified by Elsevier’s backing of a Congressional bill titled the Research Works Act (RWA). Though lesser known than the other high-profile, privacy-related bills SOPA and PIPA, the act was slated to reverse the Open Access Policy enacted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 2008 that granted the public free access to any article derived from NIH-funded research. But the fight for open access is just getting started. Seem dramatic?

KBART: Knowledge Bases And Related Tools working group Looks like: SESS636698fd811c0f0105518e7332ea5f41 A unique session ID. This expires when you stop using the site. Looks like: has_js In order to deliver the best possible experience, the site needs to know if you have JavaScript enabled. Instead of querying your browser each time a page loads, a cookie is set instead. The London Reading Club a novel for the Internet about London Underground in seven cars and a crash 253 – this is how Geoff Ryman conceived the story on Bakerloo Line. Each strand of the Tube has such unique names, appearances and characters with their similarities and differences.

Wellcome Trust will penalise scientists who don't embrace open access The Wellcome Trust plans to withhold a portion of grant money from scientists who do not make the results of their work freely available to the public, in a move that will embolden supporters of the growing open access movement in science. In addition, any research papers that are not freely available will not be counted as part of a scientist's track record when Wellcome assesses any future applications for research funding. The trust is the second largest medical research charity in the world, spending more than £600m on science every year.

Oxford Open Oxford Open OUP Supports Open Access Oxford University Press (OUP) is mission-driven to facilitate the widest possible dissemination of high-quality research. We embrace both green and gold open access (OA) publishing to support this mission. A Proven Track Record of Success Handful of Biologists Went Rogue and Published Directly to Internet Photo On Feb. 29, Carol Greider of Johns Hopkins University became the third Nobel Prize laureate biologist in a month to do something long considered taboo among biomedical researchers: She posted a report of her recent discoveries to a publicly accessible website, bioRxiv, before submitting it to a scholarly journal to review for “official’’ publication. It was a small act of information age defiance, and perhaps also a bit of a throwback, somewhat analogous to Stephen King’s 2000 self-publishing an e-book or Radiohead’s 2007 release of a download-only record without a label. To commemorate it, she tweeted the website’s confirmation under the hashtag #ASAPbio, a newly coined rallying cry of a cadre of biologists who say they want to speed science by making a key change in the way it is published.

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