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Muse

Muse
The nine muses—Clio, Thalia, Erato, Euterpe, Polyhymnia, Calliope, Terpsichore, Urania, Melpomene—on a Roman sarcophagus (2nd century AD, from the Louvre) The Muses, (Ancient Greek: Μοῦσαι, moũsai:[1] perhaps from the o-grade of the Proto-Indo-European root *men- "think"[2]) in Greek mythology, poetry and literature, are the goddesses of the inspiration of literature, science and the arts. They were considered the source of the knowledge, related orally for centuries in the ancient culture, that was contained in poetic lyrics and myths. The Muses were both the embodiments and sponsors of performed metrical speech: mousike (hence the English term "music") was just "one of the arts of the Muses". Others included Science, Geography, Mathematics, Philosophy, and especially Art, Drama, and inspiration. Some authors invoke Muses when writing poetry, hymns or epic history. Origins[edit] Muse reading a scroll, perhaps Clio (Attic red-figure lekythos, Boeotia c. 435–425 BC) In myth[edit] O Muse!

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untitled EDITORS NOTE: Although the TRIZ Journal does not endorse Tao as a religious belief system it does consider this particular paper to be an interesting perspective on the subject. Andre de Zanger and Judith Morgan Creativity Institute - 1664 3rd Avenue New York, NY 10128 (212) 289-8856 e-mail: creativityinstitute@juno.com The Dialectic Paradox or The Resolution of Opposites The philosophy of the "Tao" or the "Way", was set down in approximately 600 B.C. by Lao Tzu in 81 poems, entitled "The Tao Teh Ching". The Tao poems contain a philosophy of life that has lasted through the centuries and they have been retranslated as well as rewritten many times. They contain many ideas which are relevant in the area of creativity: "being in the moment", "effortless action", "enjoying the journey", "the importance of nothingness", "listening to your own inner way", and the "integration of opposites".

Business Plot At the time of the incidents, news media dismissed the plot, with a New York Times editorial characterizing it as a "gigantic hoax".[3] While historians have questioned whether or not a coup was actually close to execution, most agree that some sort of "wild scheme" was contemplated and discussed.[2][4][5][6][7] Background[edit] Butler and the veterans[edit] On July 17, 1932, thousands of World War I veterans converged on Washington, D.C., set up tent camps, and demanded immediate payment of bonuses due to them according to the World War Adjusted Compensation Act of 1924 (the original act made the bonuses initially due no earlier than 1925 and no later than 1945).

Shamanism, Journey to meet your Animal Totem, Power Animal, Spirit Guide As with all meditations, its not important that you see everything I am writing... just that have fun and remember why you are here... when we do meet your animal guide... unless several come at once... you just accept the first one that comes to you.. the others are merely those you wish to have.. rather than actually have.... if several come at one time.. then those are the ones you have and accept them all Using whatever method suits you... allow yourself to relax.. Imagine as clearly as you can... that you are in a large cave... there are rugs and skins on the floor... paintings etched onto the walls with charcoal and natural made colours... shelves with various books and instruments and pots and many other items that you can look at.. add to or even take.. This is your place... a safe place... herbs and flowers are drying.. hanging from the ceiling and laid out to dry. their musky and aromatic scents fill the cave... oil burners gutter and splash their light onto the walls..

Smedley Butler By the end of his career, Butler had received 16 medals, five for heroism. He is one of 19 men to twice receive the Medal of Honor, one of three to be awarded both the Marine Corps Brevet Medal and the Medal of Honor, and the only Marine to be awarded the Brevet Medal and two Medals of Honor, all for separate actions. In 1933, he became involved in a controversy known as the Business Plot, when he told a congressional committee that a group of wealthy industrialists were planning a military coup to overthrow Franklin D. Roosevelt, with Butler selected to lead a march of veterans to become dictator, similar to other Fascist regimes at that time. The individuals involved all denied the existence of a plot and the media ridiculed the allegations.

Chaos magic The chaosphere is a popular symbol of chaos magic. Many variants exist. For more, see Symbol of Chaos. General principles[edit] Chaos magicians are often seen by other occultists as dangerous or worrisome revolutionaries.[2] Muhammad Names and appellations in the Quran Sources for Muhammad's life Quran A folio from an early Quran, written in Kufic script (Abbasid period, 8th–9th century). Goetia Aleister Crowley's variant of the circle and triangle, used in the evocation of the seventy-two spirits of the Ars Goetia. Goetic Theurgy, another practice described in the Lesser Key of Solomon, is similar to the book's description of Goetia, but is used to invoke aerial spirits. Etymology[edit] Γοητεία was a term for witchcraft in Hellenistic magic. Latinized goetia via French goétie was adopted into English as goecie, goety in the 16th century. Renaissance magic[edit]

Waiting for Godot Plot[edit] Act I[edit] Estragon soon dozes off, but, after rousing him, Vladimir is not interested in hearing about Estragon's dreams—another recurring motif. List of demons in the Ars Goetia The demons' names (given below) are taken from the Ars Goetia, which differs in terms of number and ranking from the Pseudomonarchia Daemonum of Johann Weyer. As a result of multiple translations, there are multiple spellings for some of the names, which are given in the articles concerning them.[1][2] Demons[edit]

East Timor East Timor i/ˌiːst ˈtiːmɔr/ or Timor-Leste /tiˈmɔr ˈlɛʃteɪ/, officially the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste,[6] is a country in Southeast Asia.[7] It comprises the eastern half of the island of Timor, the nearby islands of Atauro and Jaco, and Oecusse, an exclave on the northwestern side of the island, within Indonesian West Timor. The country's size is about 15,410 km2 (5,400 sq mi).[8] East Timor was colonised by Portugal in the 16th century, and was known as Portuguese Timor until Portugal's decolonisation of the country. In late 1975, East Timor declared its independence but later that year was invaded and occupied by Indonesia and was declared Indonesia's 27th province the following year.

Magick One must find out for oneself, and make sure beyond doubt, who one is, what one is, why one is ...Being thus conscious of the proper course to pursue, the next thing is to understand the conditions necessary to following it out. After that, one must eliminate from oneself every element alien or hostile to success, and develop those parts of oneself which are specially needed to control the aforesaid conditions. (Crowley, Magick, Book 4 p.134) Crowley defined Magick as "the science and art of causing change to occur in conformity with will. Iconoclasm "Triumph of Orthodoxy" over iconoclasm under the Byzantine empress Theodora. Late 14th – early 15th century icon. Iconoclasm[Note 1] is the destruction of religious icons and other images or monuments for religious or political motives. In time, the word, usually in the adjectival form, has also come to refer to aggressive statements or actions against any well-established status quo. It is a frequent component of major political or religious changes.

Lesser ritual of the pentagram The Lesser Banishing Ritual of the Pentagram (or LBRP) is a ceremonial magic ritual devised and used by the original order of the Golden Dawn that has become a mainstay in modern occultism. This ritual is considered by many to be a basic preliminary to any other magical work, so much that it was the only ritual, beside initiation rituals, taught to members of the Golden Dawn before they advanced to the Inner Order.[1] The ritual is highly dynamic, using gesture, visualization and the pronunciation of certain words of power, combining prayer and invocation as well as clearing and preparing a space for further magical or meditative work. The ritual is perceived as banishing any "chaotic" and "impure" forms of the elements from the magician's circle tracing the Pentagrams in the air and by the power of certain Divine names followed by an invocation of the spiritual forces ruling the elements to fortify and guard the circle.

Martin Luther Martin Luther OSA (German: [ˈmaɐ̯tiːn ˈlʊtɐ] ( ); 10 November 1483 – 18 February 1546) was a German monk, Catholic priest, professor of theology and seminal figure of the 16th-century movement in Christianity known later as the Protestant Reformation.[1] He strongly disputed the claim that freedom from God's punishment for sin could be purchased with monetary values. He confronted indulgence salesman Johann Tetzel, a Dominican friar, with his Ninety-Five Theses in 1517. His refusal to retract all of his writings at the demand of Pope Leo X in 1520 and the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V at the Diet of Worms in 1521 resulted in his excommunication by the Pope and condemnation as an outlaw by the Emperor. Luther taught that salvation and subsequently eternity in heaven is not earned by good deeds but is received only as a free gift of God's grace through faith in Jesus Christ as redeemer from sin and subsequently eternity in Hell. Early life

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