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Muse

Muse
The nine muses—Clio, Thalia, Erato, Euterpe, Polyhymnia, Calliope, Terpsichore, Urania, Melpomene—on a Roman sarcophagus (2nd century AD, from the Louvre) The Muses, (Ancient Greek: Μοῦσαι, moũsai:[1] perhaps from the o-grade of the Proto-Indo-European root *men- "think"[2]) in Greek mythology, poetry and literature, are the goddesses of the inspiration of literature, science and the arts. They were considered the source of the knowledge, related orally for centuries in the ancient culture, that was contained in poetic lyrics and myths. The Muses were both the embodiments and sponsors of performed metrical speech: mousike (hence the English term "music") was just "one of the arts of the Muses". Others included Science, Geography, Mathematics, Philosophy, and especially Art, Drama, and inspiration. Some authors invoke Muses when writing poetry, hymns or epic history. Origins[edit] Muse reading a scroll, perhaps Clio (Attic red-figure lekythos, Boeotia c. 435–425 BC) In myth[edit] O Muse!

Character (arts) The study of a character requires an analysis of its relations with all of the other characters in the work.[9] The individual status of a character is defined through the network of oppositions (proairetic, pragmatic, linguistic, proxemic) that it forms with the other characters.[10] The relation between characters and the action of the story shifts historically, often miming shifts in society and its ideas about human individuality, self-determination, and the social order.[11] In his book Aspects of the novel, E. M. Forster defined two basic types of characters, their qualities, functions, and importance for the development of the novel: flat characters and round characters.[24] Flat characters are two-dimensional, in that they are relatively uncomplicated and do not change throughout the course of a work. By contrast, round characters are complex and undergo development, sometimes sufficiently to surprise the reader.[25] Aston, Elaine, and George Savona. 1991.

Histories Histories or, in Latin, Historiae may refer to: Histories may also refer to: untitled EDITORS NOTE: Although the TRIZ Journal does not endorse Tao as a religious belief system it does consider this particular paper to be an interesting perspective on the subject. Andre de Zanger and Judith Morgan Creativity Institute - 1664 3rd Avenue New York, NY 10128 (212) 289-8856 e-mail: creativityinstitute@juno.com The Dialectic Paradox or The Resolution of Opposites The philosophy of the "Tao" or the "Way", was set down in approximately 600 B.C. by Lao Tzu in 81 poems, entitled "The Tao Teh Ching". The Tao poems contain a philosophy of life that has lasted through the centuries and they have been retranslated as well as rewritten many times. Tao #2 People finding one thing beautiful, Think another unbeautiful, Finding one creation sound, They judge another unsound. (From the book "Tao of Creativity") When applied to creativity the importance of opposites resonates with Einstein’s idea that "the answer is within the problem". Tao #16 5. 6. Tao #23 References:

Persepolis Persepolis (Old Persian: Pārśa,[2] New Persian: پرسپولیس) literary meaning "city of Persians",[3] was the ceremonial capital of the Achaemenid Empire (ca. 550–330 BC). Persepolis is situated 70 km northeast of city of Shiraz in the Fars Province in Iran. The earliest remains of Persepolis date from around 515 BC. Name[edit] To the ancient Persians, the city was known as Pārsa (𐎱𐎠𐎼𐎿). Construction[edit] Archaeological evidence shows that the earliest remains of Persepolis date from around 515 BC. Darius ordered the construction of the Apadana Palace and the Council Hall (the Tripylon or three-gated hall), the main imperial Treasury and its surroundings. Archaeological research[edit] Odoric of Pordenone passed through Persepolis c.1320 on his way to China. Persepolitan architecture is noted for its use of wooden columns. The buildings at Persepolis include three general groupings: military quarters, the treasury, and the reception halls and occasional houses for the King. Ruins[edit]

Creating Environments That Optimize Creativity and Inspiration Today’s article takes a look at how to help maximize creative thought by carefully structuring the environment around you. Everything from the design of your office to the specific hours of the day that you choose to work can play a key role in how effective you are when it comes time to actually get things done. The essence of creativity plays a very important role in art and design. When building any piece of work you’ll want to focus not only on your mood but also atmosphere, ambiance, and emotions. Consider some of your favorite designs or artists. I’ve gotten into a few ideas regarding workflow and regaining power over your projects. Empowering your Creative Side Often times I’ll read or hear about people questioning their artistic skills. Society tends to lump these folks together, although there’s a lot more in common than creative thinking. Sounds pretty convoluted I know. Developing Personality Once you spend time training your mindset there’s almost nothing beyond your reach.

E pluribus unum E pluribus unum (/ˈiː ˈplʊərɨbəs ˈuːnəm/; Latin: [ˈeː ˈpluːrɪbʊs ˈuːnũː])—Latin for "Out of many, one"[1][2] (alternatively translated as "One out of many"[3] or "One from many")[4]—is a phrase on the Seal of the United States, along with Annuit cœptis (Latin for "He approves (has approved) of the undertaking") and Novus ordo seclorum, (Latin for "New Order of the Ages") and adopted by an Act of Congress in 1782.[2] Never codified by law, E pluribus unum was considered a de facto motto of the United States[citation needed] until 1956 when the United States Congress passed an act (H. J. Resolution 396), adopting "In God We Trust" as the official motto.[5] Origins[edit] The motto was suggested in 1776 by Pierre Eugene du Simitiere to the committee responsible for developing the seal. Meaning[edit] The traditionally understood meaning of the phrase was that out of many states (or colonies) emerge a single nation. Usage on coins[edit] Half Dollar (reverse), 1807 According to the U.S.

Make Something Cool Every Day I’ve seen a lot of designers take on a daily project of some sort lately. I think it’s a great idea—something to keep your creativity flowing, especially during downtime. And I’ve particularly enjoyed watching the progress Mark Weaver has made with his Make Something Cool Every Day project. I’m not sure what the thinking behind these pieces are, but I’m really drawn to his layering of photography, illustration, color and type. You can see everything he’s completed so far on Flickr or Bēhance. About Courtney Courtney is the founder of Design Work Life and Seamless Creative, a small design studio she runs with her husband Brian. Read More: View Courtney’s Posts Follow Courtney:

Cyrus the Great Cyrus II of Persia (Old Persian: [6] Kūruš; New Persian: کوروش بزرگ c. 600 BC or 576 BC–530 BC[7]), commonly known as Cyrus the Great,[8] also known as Cyrus the Elder, was the founder of the Achaemenid Empire.[9] Under his rule, the empire embraced all the previous civilized states of the ancient Near East,[9] expanded vastly and eventually conquered most of Southwest Asia and much of Central Asia and the Caucasus. From the Mediterranean Sea and Hellespont in the west to the Indus River in the east, Cyrus the Great created the largest empire the world had yet seen.[10] His regal titles in full were The Great King, King of Persia, King of Anshan, King of Media, King of Babylon, King of Sumer and Akkad, and King of the Four Corners of the World. He also proclaimed what has been identified by scholars and archaeologists[who?] The reign of Cyrus the Great lasted between 29 and 31 years. So said the Lord to His anointed one, to Cyrus Background[edit] Etymology[edit] Dynastic history[edit]

Talent Development Resources : creativity and personal growth Being creative and realizing our talents involves a lot of self-awareness and respecting who we really are, including our unconscious depths. In an interview about her film “Flightplan,” Jodie Foster commented, “When you’re a dramatic actor you look for films that hit you in the gut, in this unconscious place that really moves you, and then you can’t help but make the movie because it’s something that you fear and you want to know more about it.” She added, “I think that every film that I do, even though it might not relate to me autobiographically, has some very personal pull in there and there are questions that I ask myself that I can’t really resolve any other way.” [From darkhorizons.com interview by Paul Fischer, Sept 15 2005.] In another interview, Foster says she was attracted to the film because of the “full journey of the character, the primal connection to children. In a 1991 interview, she acknowledged “There are certain sorts of unconscious paths you choose.”

League of Nations The League of Nations (abbreviated as LN in English, "Société des Nations" abbreviated as SDN in French) was an intergovernmental organisation founded as a result of the Paris Peace Conference that ended the First World War. It was the first international organisation whose principal mission was to maintain world peace.[1] Its primary goals, as stated in its Covenant, included preventing wars through collective security and disarmament, and settling international disputes through negotiation and arbitration.[2] Other issues in this and related treaties included labour conditions, just treatment of native inhabitants, human and drug trafficking, arms trade, global health, prisoners of war, and protection of minorities in Europe.[3] At its greatest extent from 28 September 1934 to 23 February 1935, it had 58 members. The diplomatic philosophy behind the League represented a fundamental shift from the preceding hundred years. Origins[edit] Languages and symbols[edit] Principal organs[edit]

How To Steal Like An Artist by Austin Kleon Wednesday, March 30th, 2011 Buy the book: Amazon | B&N | More… Here’s what a few folks have said about it: “Brilliant and real and true.”—Rosanne Cash“Filled with well-formed advice that applies to nearly any kind of work.” Read an excerpt below… Tags: steal like an artist Business magnate Howard Hughes was a major American aviation and film tycoon during the 20th century. A business magnate (or industrialist) is a person of great influence, importance, or standing in a particular enterprise or field of business. The term characteristically refers to a wealthy individual who controls through personal business ownership or dominant shareholding position a firm or industry whose goods, products, or services are widely consumed. Etymology[edit] The word magnate derives from the Latin magnates (plural of magnas), meaning "a great man" or "great nobleman". The word tycoon derives from the Japanese word taikun (大君?) The word mogul is an English corruption of mughal, Persian or Arabic for "Mongol". Usage[edit] Business magnates are venture or firm owners that amass on their own or wield substantial family fortunes in the process of building or running their enterprises. Examples of well-known business magnates include such historical figures as oilman John D. See also[edit] Articles

History of Belgium The history of Belgium stretches back before the origin of the modern state of that name in 1830. Belgium's history is intertwined with those of its neighbours: the Netherlands, Germany, France and Luxembourg. For most of its history, what is now Belgium was either a part of a larger territory, such as the Carolingian Empire, or divided into a number of smaller states, prominent among them being the Duchy of Brabant, the County of Flanders, the Prince-Bishopric of Liège and Luxembourg. Due to its strategic location and the many armies fighting on its soil, Belgium since the Thirty Years' War (1618-1648) has often been called the "battlefield of Europe" or the "cockpit of Europe".[1] It is also remarkable as a European nation which contains, and is divided by, a language boundary between Latin-derived French, and Germanic Dutch. Belgium's formation, like that of its Benelux neighbours, can be traced back to the "Seventeen Provinces" within the Burgundian Netherlands. Prehistory[edit]

Bowdoin College Bowdoin College /ˈboʊdɨn/ is a private liberal arts college located in the coastal Maine town of Brunswick. Founded in 1794, the college enrolls 1,839 students and has been coeducational since 1971. Bowdoin offers 33 majors and 4 additional minors, and has a student-faculty ratio of 9:1. Famous alumni include Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Franklin Pierce, and Joshua Chamberlain. Bowdoin has an acceptance rate of 14.5%[2] and was listed as the fourth-best liberal arts college in the U.S. in the 2014 U.S. History[edit] Founding and 19th century[edit] Bowdoin College was chartered in 1794 by Governor Samuel Adams of Massachusetts, of which Maine was then a district, and was named for former Massachusetts governor James Bowdoin, whose son James Bowdoin III was an early benefactor. Twentieth century[edit] Bowdoin was also the Medical School of Maine from 1821–1921 View of the campus from Coles Tower (constructed as the "Senior Center"), the second tallest building in Maine

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