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Angel

Angel
An angel (from the Greek ἄγγελος - ángelos[1]) is a supernatural being or spirit, often depicted in humanoid form with feathered wings on their backs and halos around their heads, found in various religions and mythologies. The theological study of angels is known as "angelology". In Zoroastrianism and Abrahamic religions they are often depicted as benevolent celestial beings who act as intermediaries between Heaven and Earth, or as guardian spirits or a guiding influence.[2] The term "angel" has also been expanded to various notions of spirits found in many other religious traditions. Other roles of angels include protecting and guiding human beings, and carrying out God's tasks.[3] Etymology[edit] The word angel in English is a fusion of the Old English/Germanic word engel (with a hard g) and the Old French angele. Judaism[edit] The term מלאך (mal'āk̠) is also used in the Tanakh; a similar term, ملائكة (malā'ikah), is used in the Qur'an. "... Jewish angelic hierarchy[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angel

Related:  Angels and DemonsSoul

Maalik In Islamic belief, Maalik (Arabic: مالك‎ / mālik) denotes an angel in Hell (Arabic: جهنم‎ / jahannam) who guards the Hellfire, assisted by 19 mysterious guardians known as ‏الزبانية / az-zabānīya. In the Qur'an, Maalik is mentioned in Sura 43:77, telling the wicked who appeal to him that they must remain in Hell because "they abhorred the truth when the truth was brought to them." According to Islamic legendary tradition, Muhammad was taken to see Heaven and Hell, and there, he saw Maalik, and was shown a glimpse of the suffering of the people of Hell. The Qur'an itself does neither explain nor specifically describe the origin, purpose or character of Maalik.

Deity In religious belief, a deity ( i/ˈdiː.ɨti/ or C. Scott Littleton's Gods, Goddesses, and Mythology defined a deity as "a being with powers greater than those of ordinary humans, but who interacts with humans, positively or negatively, in ways that carry humans to new levels of consciousness beyond the grounded preoccupations of ordinary life. Weakness "Asthenia" redirects here. The tortrix moth genus is considered a junior synonym of Epinotia. Diagnostic Distinctions[edit] True weakness vs. perceived weakness[edit] True weakness (or neuromuscular) describes a condition where the force exerted by the muscles is less than would be expected, for example muscular dystrophy.Perceived weakness (or non-neuromuscular) describes a condition where a person feels more effort than normal is required to exert a given amount of force but actual muscle strength is normal, for example chronic fatigue syndrome.[2] In some conditions, such as myasthenia gravis, muscle strength is normal when resting, but true weakness occurs after the muscle has been subjected to exercise.

Guardian angel A guardian angel is an angel assigned to protect and guide a particular person or group, kingdom or country. Belief in guardian angels can be traced throughout all antiquity. The concept of tutelary angels and their hierarchy was extensively developed in Christianity in the 5th century by Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite. The theology of angels and tutelary spirits has undergone many refinements since the 400s. Belief in both the East and the West is that guardian angels serve to protect whichever person God assigns them to,[1] and present prayer to God on that person's behalf. Origin[edit]

Aevum The concept of the aevum dates back at least to Albertus Magnus’s treatise De quattuor coaequaevis.[3] Its most familiar description is found in the Summa theologica of Thomas Aquinas. Aquinas identifies the aevum as the measure of the existence of beings that “recede less from permanence of being, forasmuch as their being neither consists in change, nor is the subject of change; nevertheless they have change annexed to them either actually, or potentially.” As examples, he cites the heavenly bodies (which, in medieval science, were considered changeless in their nature, though variable in their position) and the angels, which “have an unchangeable being as regards their nature with changeableness as regards choice”.[4] Frank Sheed, in his book Theology and Sanity, said that the aevum is also the measure of existence for the saints in heaven: “Aeviternity is the proper sphere of every created spirit, and therefore of the human soul... Jump up ^ Anzulewicz, Henryk.

Kundalini Kundalini chakra diagram Kundalini (Sanskrit kuṇḍalinī, कुण्डलिनी, pronunciation ) stems from yogic philosophy as a form of feminine shakti or "corporeal energy".[1] Kundalini is described within Eastern religious, or spiritual, tradition as an indwelling spiritual energy that can be awakened in order to purify the subtle system and ultimately to bestow the state of Yoga, or Divine Union, upon the 'seeker' of truth ".[2][3] The Yoga Upanishads describe Kundalini as lying "coiled" at the base of the spine, represented as either a goddess or sleeping serpent waiting to be awakened. In modern commentaries, Kundalini has been called an unconscious, instinctive or libidinal force.[1][4][5]

Cotton Picking cotton in Oklahoma, USA, in the 1890s Cotton is a soft, fluffy staple fiber that grows in a boll, or protective capsule, around the seeds of cotton plants of the genus Gossypium. The fiber is almost pure cellulose. Under natural conditions, the cotton bolls will tend to increase the dispersion of the seeds. Choronzon Spelling variations[edit] Choronzon according to Crowley[edit] Otherwise known as the Demon of Dispersion, Choronzon is described by Crowley as a temporary personification of the raving and inconsistent forces that occupy the Abyss.[1][5] In this system, Choronzon is given form in evocation only so it may be mastered.

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