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Angel

Angel
An angel (from the Greek ἄγγελος - ángelos[1]) is a supernatural being or spirit, often depicted in humanoid form with feathered wings on their backs and halos around their heads, found in various religions and mythologies. The theological study of angels is known as "angelology". In Zoroastrianism and Abrahamic religions they are often depicted as benevolent celestial beings who act as intermediaries between Heaven and Earth, or as guardian spirits or a guiding influence.[2] The term "angel" has also been expanded to various notions of spirits found in many other religious traditions. Other roles of angels include protecting and guiding human beings, and carrying out God's tasks.[3] Etymology[edit] The word angel in English is a fusion of the Old English/Germanic word engel (with a hard g) and the Old French angele. Judaism[edit] The term מלאך (mal'āk̠) is also used in the Tanakh; a similar term, ملائكة (malā'ikah), is used in the Qur'an. "... Jewish angelic hierarchy[edit] Related:  Angels and DemonsSoul

Maalik In Islamic belief, Maalik (Arabic: مالك‎ / mālik) denotes an angel in Hell (Arabic: جهنم‎ / jahannam) who guards the Hellfire, assisted by 19 mysterious guardians known as ‏الزبانية / az-zabānīya. In the Qur'an, Maalik is mentioned in Sura 43:77, telling the wicked who appeal to him that they must remain in Hell because "they abhorred the truth when the truth was brought to them." According to Islamic legendary tradition, Muhammad was taken to see Heaven and Hell, and there, he saw Maalik, and was shown a glimpse of the suffering of the people of Hell. The Qur'an itself does neither explain nor specifically describe the origin, purpose or character of Maalik. In art, Malik is often depicted with a stern expression on his face, since the Hadith (a collection of Muslim commentaries on the teachings of the prophet Muhammad) says that Malik never laughs. Role in Religious Texts:

Cotton Picking cotton in Oklahoma, USA, in the 1890s Cotton is a soft, fluffy staple fiber that grows in a boll, or protective capsule, around the seeds of cotton plants of the genus Gossypium. The fiber is almost pure cellulose. Under natural conditions, the cotton bolls will tend to increase the dispersion of the seeds. The plant is a shrub native to tropical and subtropical regions around the world, including the Americas, Africa, and India. The fiber is most often spun into yarn or thread and used to make a soft, breathable textile. Current estimates for world production are about 25 million tonnes or 110 million bales annually, accounting for 2.5% of the world's arable land. Types There are four commercially grown species of cotton, all domesticated in antiquity: The two New World cotton species account for the vast majority of modern cotton production, but the two Old World species were widely used before the 1900s. History According to the Columbia Encyclopedia:[9] Cultivation

Deity In religious belief, a deity ( i/ˈdiː.ɨti/ or C. Scott Littleton's Gods, Goddesses, and Mythology defined a deity as "a being with powers greater than those of ordinary humans, but who interacts with humans, positively or negatively, in ways that carry humans to new levels of consciousness beyond the grounded preoccupations of ordinary life."[2] Historically, natural phenomena whose causes were not well understood, such as lightning and catastrophes such as earthquakes and floods, were attributed to them. Etymology[edit] The word "deity" derives from the Latin deus ("god"), which is related through a common Indo-European origin to Sanskrit deva ("god"), devi ("goddess"), divya ("transcendental", "spiritual"). Other words for the concept[edit] The English word "god" comes from Anglo-Saxon; similar words are found in many Germanic languages (for example, the German "Gott" — "god"). The Turkic word for god is Tengri; it exists as Tanrı in Turkish. Relation with humanity[edit] Polytheism[edit]

Daemon (classical mythology) The words "dæmon" and "daimôn" are Latinized versions of the Greek "δαίμων", a reference to the daemons of ancient Greek religion and mythology, as well as later Hellenistic religion and philosophy.[1] Characterizations of the daemon as a dangerous, if not evil, lesser spirit were developed by Plato and his pupil Xenocrates,[2][dubious ] and later absorbed in Christian patristic writings along with Neo-Platonic elements. In the Old Testament, evil spirits appear in the book of Judges and in Kings. Satanists have used the word demon to define a knowledge that has been banned by the Church. Carnelian gem imprint representing Socrates, Rome, 1st century BC - 1st century AD. Burkert suggests that, for Plato, theology rests on two Forms: the Good and the Simple; which “Xenocrates unequivocally called the unity god” in sharp contrast to the poet's gods of epic and tragedy.[2] Although much like the gods, these figures were not always depicted without considerable moral ambiguity:

Seraph A seraph (/ˈsɛr.əf/; pl. seraphs or seraphim /ˈsɛr.ə.fɪm/; Hebrew: שְׂרָפִים śərāfîm, singular שָׂרָף śārāf; Latin: seraphi[m], singular seraph[us]; Greek: σεραφείμ) is a type of celestial or heavenly being in the Abrahamic religions. Origins and development[edit] The word seraphim, literally "burning ones", transliterates a Hebrew plural noun; translation yields seraphs. The word saraph/seraphim appears three times in the Torah (Numbers 21:6–8, Deuteronomy 8:15) and four times in the Book of Isaiah (6:2–6, 14:29, 30:6). In Numbers and Deuteronomy the "seraphim" are serpents—the association of serpents as "burning ones" is possibly due to the burning sensation of the poison.[1] Isaiah also uses the word in close association with words to describe snakes (nachash, the generic word for snakes, in 14:29, and epheh, viper, in 30:6). In the Hebrew Bible the seraphs do not have the status of angels. In Judaism[edit] In Christianity[edit] St. As mascots and symbols[edit] See also[edit]

Aevum The concept of the aevum dates back at least to Albertus Magnus’s treatise De quattuor coaequaevis.[3] Its most familiar description is found in the Summa theologica of Thomas Aquinas. Aquinas identifies the aevum as the measure of the existence of beings that “recede less from permanence of being, forasmuch as their being neither consists in change, nor is the subject of change; nevertheless they have change annexed to them either actually, or potentially.” As examples, he cites the heavenly bodies (which, in medieval science, were considered changeless in their nature, though variable in their position) and the angels, which “have an unchangeable being as regards their nature with changeableness as regards choice”.[4] Frank Sheed, in his book Theology and Sanity, said that the aevum is also the measure of existence for the saints in heaven: “Aeviternity is the proper sphere of every created spirit, and therefore of the human soul... Jump up ^ Anzulewicz, Henryk.

Weakness "Asthenia" redirects here. The tortrix moth genus is considered a junior synonym of Epinotia. Diagnostic Distinctions[edit] True weakness vs. perceived weakness[edit] True weakness (or neuromuscular) describes a condition where the force exerted by the muscles is less than would be expected, for example muscular dystrophy.Perceived weakness (or non-neuromuscular) describes a condition where a person feels more effort than normal is required to exert a given amount of force but actual muscle strength is normal, for example chronic fatigue syndrome.[2] In some conditions, such as myasthenia gravis, muscle strength is normal when resting, but true weakness occurs after the muscle has been subjected to exercise. Asthenia vs. myasthenia[edit] Differentiating psychogenic (perceived) asthenia and true asthenia from myasthenia is often difficult, and in time apparent psychogenic asthenia accompanying many chronic disorders is seen to progress into a primary weakness. Differential diagnosis[edit]

Kundalini Kundalini chakra diagram Kundalini (Sanskrit kuṇḍalinī, कुण्डलिनी, pronunciation ) stems from yogic philosophy as a form of feminine shakti or "corporeal energy".[1] Kundalini is described within Eastern religious, or spiritual, tradition as an indwelling spiritual energy that can be awakened in order to purify the subtle system and ultimately to bestow the state of Yoga, or Divine Union, upon the 'seeker' of truth ".[2][3] The Yoga Upanishads describe Kundalini as lying "coiled" at the base of the spine, represented as either a goddess or sleeping serpent waiting to be awakened. In modern commentaries, Kundalini has been called an unconscious, instinctive or libidinal force.[1][4][5] It is reported that Kundalini awakening results in deep meditation, enlightenment and bliss.[6] This awakening involves the Kundalini physically moving up the central channel to reside within the Sahasrara Chakra above the head. Etymology[edit] The Sanskrit adjective kuṇḍalin means "circular, annular". and

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