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Gnosis

Gnosis
Etymology[edit] Gnosis is a feminine Greek noun, which means "knowledge".[2] It is often used for personal knowledge compared with intellectual knowledge (eidein), as with the French connaitre compared with savoir, or the German kennen rather than wissen.[3] Related adjective gnostikos[edit] A related term is the adjective gnostikos, "cognitive,"[4] a reasonably common adjective in Classical Greek.[5] Plato uses the plural adjective γνωστικοί – gnostikoi and the singular feminine adjective γνωστικὴ ἐπιστήμη – gnostike episteme in his Politikos where Gnostike episteme was also used to indicate one's aptitude.[citation needed] The terms do not appear to indicate any mystic, esoteric or hidden meaning in the works of Plato, but instead expressed a sort of higher intelligence and ability analogous to talent.[6] Plato The Statesman 258e— Stranger: In this way, then, divide all science into two arts, calling the one practical (praktikos), and the other purely intellectual (gnostikos).

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Related:  Religous Studyesoteric ChristianityGno Know

Theurgy Definitions[edit] Neoplatonism[edit] Although the Neoplatonists are considered polytheists, they embraced a form of monism. Samael Aun Weor Samael Aun Weor Samael Aun Weor (March 6, 1917 – December 24, 1977), born Víctor Manuel Gómez Rodríguez, was an author, lecturer and founder of the Universal Christian Gnostic Movement.[1] His teaching of 'The Doctrine of Synthesis' of all religions in both their esoteric and exoteric aspects[2] has been called neo-Gnostic by the historian of esotericism Arthur Versluis[3] and called by the historian Jean-François Mayer "a science of consciousness or knowledge that may be attained through certain techniques."[4] In his over sixty books and hundreds of held conferences, he describes a teaching called "gnosis", the Greek word for "knowledge", from which is derived the name "Gnosticism". Biography[edit]

Nous This article is about a philosophical term. For the philosophy journal, see Noûs. In philosophy, common English translations include "understanding" and "mind"; or sometimes "thought" or "reason" (in the sense of that which reasons, not the activity of reasoning).[2][3] It is also often described as something equivalent to perception except that it works within the mind ("the mind's eye").[4] It has been suggested that the basic meaning is something like "awareness".[5] In colloquial British English, nous also denotes "good sense", which is close to one everyday meaning it had in Ancient Greece. This diagram shows the medieval understanding of spheres of the cosmos, derived from Aristotle, and as per the standard explanation by Ptolemy. It came to be understood that at least the outermost sphere (marked "Primũ Mobile") has its own intellect, intelligence or nous - a cosmic equivalent to the human mind. Pre-Socratic usage[edit]

Gnostic initiation Initiation is a ceremony, usually a group action, in which secret knowledge is transmitted to an aspirant which will produce great changes in him. Once initiated, the aspirant will never be the same again. When an initiation is real, is true, it is a turning point in the aspirant's life. There is a before and after as regards the initiation, because something has occurred in this ceremony which has changed his life in a spectacular way, something he will never be able to forget. Hermetic Qabalah Teachings[edit] Conception of Divinity[edit] A primary concern of Hermetic Qabalah is the nature of divinity, its conception of which is quite markedly different from that presented in monotheistic religions; in particular there is not the strict separation between divinity and humankind which is seen in monotheisms.[2] Hermetic Qabalah holds to the neoplatonic conception that the manifest universe, of which material creation is a part, arose as a series of emanations from the godhead.[3] The Sephiroth in Hermetic Qabalah[edit]

Humiliati The Humiliati were an Italian religious order of men formed probably in the 12th century. It was suppressed by a Papal bull in 1571 though an associated order of women continued into the 20th century. Origin[edit] Coat of Arms of the Humiliati Order Tacit knowledge Tacit knowledge (as opposed to formal, codified or explicit knowledge) is the kind of knowledge that is difficult to transfer to another person by means of writing it down or verbalizing it. For example, stating to someone that London is in the United Kingdom is a piece of explicit knowledge that can be written down, transmitted, and understood by a recipient. However, the ability to speak a language, knead dough, use algebra,[1] or design and use complex equipment requires all sorts of knowledge that is not always known explicitly, even by expert practitioners, and which is difficult or impossible to explicitly transfer to other users. While tacit knowledge appears to be simple, it has far-reaching consequences and is not widely understood. Definition[edit]

Multiple personality information, Marvin S. Beitner Ph.D., Long Beach, Fountain Valley, CA Multiple Personality, or Dissociative Identity Disorder are psychodiagnostic terms referring to the same emotional disorder. (DSM IV, the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders, and ICD-9 CM, the International Statistical Classification of Diseases, respectively). We have always been fascinated by apparent inconsistencies in how people behave, as expressed, for example in the following nursery rhyme. Iamblichus Iamblichus, also known as Iamblichus Chalcidensis, or Iamblichus of Apamea (Greek: Ἰάμβλιχος, probably from Syriac or Aramaic ya-mlku, "He is king", c. 245 – c. 325), was a Syrian[1][2] Neoplatonist philosopher who determined the direction taken by later Neoplatonic philosophy. Iamblichus' life[edit] Only a fraction of Iamblichus' books have survived.

Pray and work Relief with the motto (in gold) Ora et labora In Christian mysticism, the phrase pray and work (or "pray and labor", in Latin ora et labora) refers to the monastic practice of working and praying, generally associated with its use in the Rule of St. Benedict.[1] Benedict viewed prayer and work as partners, and believed in combining contemplation with action.[2] The phrase expresses the need to balance prayer and work in monastic settings and has been used in many religious communities from the Middle Ages onwards. Wesley College, Colombo, a high school in Sri Lanka founded by Methodist missionaries in 1874, has been using Ora Et Labora as the motto since its inception.

Higher consciousness Higher consciousness is the consciousness of a higher Self, transcendental reality, or God. It is "the part of the human being that is capable of transcending animal instincts". The concept developed in German Idealism, and is a central notion in contemporary popular spirituality. Philosophy[edit] Imaginary friend Imaginary friends or imaginary companions are a psychological and social phenomenon where a friendship or other interpersonal relationship takes place in the imagination rather than external physical reality. Imaginary friends are fictional characters created for improvisational role-playing. They often have elaborate personalities and behaviors. Although they may seem very real to their creators, children usually understand that their imaginary friends are not real.[1] The first studies focusing on imaginary friends are believed to have been conducted during the 1890s.[2]

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