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Gnosis

Gnosis
Etymology[edit] Gnosis is a feminine Greek noun, which means "knowledge".[2] It is often used for personal knowledge compared with intellectual knowledge (eidein), as with the French connaitre compared with savoir, or the German kennen rather than wissen.[3] Related adjective gnostikos[edit] A related term is the adjective gnostikos, "cognitive,"[4] a reasonably common adjective in Classical Greek.[5] Plato uses the plural adjective γνωστικοί – gnostikoi and the singular feminine adjective γνωστικὴ ἐπιστήμη – gnostike episteme in his Politikos where Gnostike episteme was also used to indicate one's aptitude. Plato The Statesman 258e— Stranger: In this way, then, divide all science into two arts, calling the one practical (praktikos), and the other purely intellectual (gnostikos). In the Hellenistic era the term became associated with the mystery cults. Hellenic philosophy[edit] Judeo-Christian usage[edit] Hellenistic Jewish literature[edit] New Testament[edit] The "Gnostic" sects[edit] Related:  Religous Studyesoteric ChristianityGno Know

Theurgy Definitions[edit] Neoplatonism[edit] Although the Neoplatonists are considered polytheists, they embraced a form of monism. Iamblichus' analysis was that the transcendent cannot be grasped with mental contemplation because the transcendent is supra-rational. Emperor Julian[edit] The Emperor Julian the Apostate (332-363), embraced Neoplatonic philosophy and worked to replace Christianity with a version of Neoplatonic paganism. Julian favored ritual theurgy, with an emphasis on sacrifice and prayer. Esoteric Christian theurgy[edit] Esoteric Christianity accepts theurgy as a tradition that could greatly benefit a person. Jewish theurgy[edit] For the Kabbalist, God is a single oneness, not separate "gods". See also[edit] References[edit] External links[edit] Samael Aun Weor Samael Aun Weor Samael Aun Weor (March 6, 1917 – December 24, 1977), born Víctor Manuel Gómez Rodríguez, was an author, lecturer and founder of the Universal Christian Gnostic Movement.[1] His teaching of 'The Doctrine of Synthesis' of all religions in both their esoteric and exoteric aspects[2] has been called neo-Gnostic by the historian of esotericism Arthur Versluis[3] and called by the historian Jean-François Mayer "a science of consciousness or knowledge that may be attained through certain techniques."[4] In his over sixty books and hundreds of held conferences, he describes a teaching called "gnosis", the Greek word for "knowledge", from which is derived the name "Gnosticism". Biography[edit] Victor Manuel Gómez Rodriguez was born in Bogotá, Cundinamarca, Republic of Colombia, son of Manuel Gómez Quijano and Francisca Rodríguez de Gómez. He was briefly married to Sara Dueños and they had a son named "Imperator". In 1948 he began teaching a small group of students. Samael Aun Weor.

Nous This article is about a philosophical term. For the philosophy journal, see Noûs. In philosophy, common English translations include "understanding" and "mind"; or sometimes "thought" or "reason" (in the sense of that which reasons, not the activity of reasoning).[2][3] It is also often described as something equivalent to perception except that it works within the mind ("the mind's eye").[4] It has been suggested that the basic meaning is something like "awareness".[5] In colloquial British English, nous also denotes "good sense", which is close to one everyday meaning it had in Ancient Greece. This diagram shows the medieval understanding of spheres of the cosmos, derived from Aristotle, and as per the standard explanation by Ptolemy. In Aristotle's influential works, the term was carefully distinguished from sense perception, imagination and reason, although these terms are closely inter-related. Pre-Socratic usage[edit] The first use of the word nous in the Iliad. Xenophon[edit]

God as the Devil Satan in the Hebrew Bible[edit] In the Hebrew Bible God is depicted as the source of both light and darkness, as in Isaiah 45:6-7.[1] However this concept of "darkness" or "evil" was not yet personified as "the devil," a later development in Jewish thought.[2] The author of the Books of Chronicles is thought to have first introduced the notion of "divine intermediaries", not found in the earlier parts of the Hebrew Bible. The main evidence adduced by theologians to support this is 1 Chronicles 21, a reworked version of 2 Samuel 24. This change is made most evident in the Chronicler's treatment of 2 Samuel 24:1 "And again the anger of the LORD was kindled against Israel, and he moved David against them to say, Go, number Israel and Judah." which in 1 Chronicles 21:1 becomes: "And Satan stood up against Israel, and provoked David to number Israel." While in the book of Samuel, YHWH himself is the agent in punishing Israel, while in 1 Chronicles, an "adversary" is introduced. Marcion of Sinope

Hermetic Qabalah Teachings[edit] Conception of Divinity[edit] A primary concern of Hermetic Qabalah is the nature of divinity, its conception of which is quite markedly different from that presented in monotheistic religions; in particular there is not the strict separation between divinity and humankind which is seen in monotheisms.[2] Hermetic Qabalah holds to the neoplatonic conception that the manifest universe, of which material creation is a part, arose as a series of emanations from the godhead.[3] The Sephiroth in Hermetic Qabalah[edit] From Ain Suph Aur crystallises Kether, the first sephirah of the Hermetic Qabalistic tree of life. Each sephirah is considered to be an emanation of the divine energy (often described as 'the divine light') which ever flows from the unmanifest, through Kether into manifestation.[7] This flow of light is indicated by the lightning flash shown on diagrams of the sephirotic tree which passes through each sephirah in turn according to their enumerations. History[edit]

Humiliati The Humiliati were an Italian religious order of men formed probably in the 12th century. It was suppressed by a Papal bull in 1571 though an associated order of women continued into the 20th century. Origin[edit] Coat of Arms of the Humiliati Order Its origin is obscure. It is said that at this time they were often called Berettini, from the shape of their head-dress. Returning to their own country, the Humiliati had contact with St Bernard. At that time there were certain citizens of Lombard towns who lived at home with their families, chose a distinctive form of religious life, refrained from lies, oaths and law suits, were satisfied with plain clothing, and argued for the Catholic faith. The fraternity spread rapidly and gave rise to two new branches, a "second order" composed of women, and a "third order" composed of priests. Consolidation[edit] Some years later, on the advice of St John of Meda (d. 1159), they embraced the Rule of St Benedict, adapted by him to their needs.

Tacit knowledge Tacit knowledge (as opposed to formal, codified or explicit knowledge) is the kind of knowledge that is difficult to transfer to another person by means of writing it down or verbalizing it. For example, stating to someone that London is in the United Kingdom is a piece of explicit knowledge that can be written down, transmitted, and understood by a recipient. However, the ability to speak a language, knead dough, use algebra,[1] or design and use complex equipment requires all sorts of knowledge that is not always known explicitly, even by expert practitioners, and which is difficult or impossible to explicitly transfer to other users. While tacit knowledge appears to be simple, it has far-reaching consequences and is not widely understood. Definition[edit] The term “tacit knowing” or “tacit knowledge” was first introduced into philosophy by Michael Polanyi in 1958 in his magnum opus Personal Knowledge. Tacit knowledge is not easily shared. Tacit knowledge vs. Transmission models[edit]

Antinomianism In Christianity, an antinomian is "one who holds that under the gospel dispensation of grace the moral law is of no use or obligation because faith alone is necessary to salvation".[1] Many antinomians, however, believe that Christians will obey the moral law despite their freedom from it. The distinction between antinomian and other Christian views on the moral law is that antinomians believe that obedience to the law is motivated by an internal principle flowing from belief rather than any external compulsion.[2] Examples are Martin Luther's critique of antinomianism and the Antinomian Controversy of the 17th century Massachusetts Bay Colony. Although the term originated in the 16th century, the topic has its roots in Christian views on the old covenant extending back to the 1st century. It can also be extended to any individual who rejects a socially established morality.[1] Few groups, other than Christian anarchists or Jewish anarchists, explicitly call themselves antinomian.

Christian Kabbalah The Renaissance saw the birth of Christian Kabbalah/Cabala (From the Hebrew קַבָּלָה "reception", often transliterated with a 'C' to distinguish it from Jewish Kabbalah and Hermetic Qabalah[1]), also spelled Cabbala. Interest grew among some Christian scholars in what they saw to be the mystical aspects of Judaic Kabbalah, which were compatible with Christian theology. Although somewhat obscure, the tradition of Christian Cabala or Catholic Cabala still persists today.[citation needed] Background[edit] The movement was influenced by a desire to interpret aspects of Christianity even more mystically than current Christian Mystics. After the 18th century, Kabbalah became blended with European occultism, some of which had a religious basis; but the main thrust of Christian Kabbalah was by then dead. Medieval precursors[edit] Blessed Raymond Llull[edit] Spanish conversos[edit] Christian Kabbalists[edit] Pico della Mirandola[edit] That could not be said of Reuchlin, Knorr von Rosenroth and Kemper.

Pray and work Relief with the motto (in gold) Ora et labora In Christian mysticism, the phrase pray and work (or "pray and labor", in Latin ora et labora) refers to the monastic practice of working and praying, generally associated with its use in the Rule of St. Benedict.[1] Benedict viewed prayer and work as partners, and believed in combining contemplation with action.[2] The phrase expresses the need to balance prayer and work in monastic settings and has been used in many religious communities from the Middle Ages onwards. Wesley College, Colombo, a high school in Sri Lanka founded by Methodist missionaries in 1874, has been using Ora Et Labora as the motto since its inception. Some orders (such as the Cistercians) applied the concept directly to farm work and became an element in the movement towards land reclamation from rot and agricultural development in Western Europe. The motto of the religious Zionist organisation Bnei Akiva is torah v'avodah, "Torah and work". See also[edit] Notes[edit]

Higher consciousness Higher consciousness is the consciousness of a higher Self, transcendental reality, or God. It is "the part of the human being that is capable of transcending animal instincts". The concept developed in German Idealism, and is a central notion in contemporary popular spirituality. Philosophy[edit] Fichte[edit] Fichte distinguished the finite or empirical ego from the pure or infinite ego. Fichte (1762-1814) was one of the founding figures of German idealism, which developed from the theoretical and ethical writings of Immanuel Kant. According to Michael Whiteman, Fichte's philosophical system "is a remarkable western formulation of eastern mystical teachings (of which he seems to have had no direct knowledge)." Schopenhauer[edit] In 1812 Schopenhauer started to use the term "the better consciousness", a consciousness ... According to Schopenhauer, The better consciousness in me lifts me into a world where there is no longer personality and causality or subject or object. Religion[edit]

SIGNS: THE SIGNIFICANCE OF +++Representing God and the Saints+++ PLANTS, TREES AND FLOWERS ACACIA: The acacia is a symbol of the immortality of the soul. ALMOND: The almond is a symbol of Divine approval or favor. ANEMONE: The anemone may be depicted in scenes of the Crucifixion, or in conjunction with the Virgin Mary to show her sorrow for the Passion of Christ. APPLE: In Latin, the word for apple and the word for evil, malum, are identical. This passage is interpreted as referring to Christ. As Christ is the new Adam, so, in tradition, the Virgin Mary is considered to be the new Eve, and, for this reason, an apple placed in the hands of Mary is also considered an allusion to salvation. VIEW VIRGIN UNDER THE APPLE TREE ASPEN: There are two stories about the aspen tree. BRAMBLE: The bramble was believed to be the burning bush which the Angel of the Lord appeared to Moses in Exodus 3. BULRUSH [CATTAIL]: The bulrush is a lowly, thickly clustered, common plant, growing near the water. among with the planted grain.

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