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Paper Toys: Flextangles

Paper Toys: Flextangles
Today’s paper toys, Flextangles, are the fourth project in our collaborative series STEAM POWER: Empowering kids to explore the world through creative projects. Today’s topic is COMPUTE! Since I recently answered this question wrong, I decided it might be good idea for me to limit my math based project to something I’m good at: geometry. I’ve been itching to try making a flexagon ever since my friend Erica mentioned them, so I decided it was high time we made one. If you aren’t familiar with flexagons scroll down to find out more. I also decided to incorporate drawing into the project to add a level of “computation.” See our complete PAPER TOYS PLAY PACK here This post contains affiliate links to products I love and recommend to my readers. Materials Cardstock This is the BEST DEAL you will find on CARDSTOCK! Instructions Step One Download and print the templateStep Two Draw different designs in each row of triangular sides. You’re done! Troubleshooting Tips About Flexagons and Zentangle More

https://babbledabbledo.com/paper-toys-flextangles/

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grade 5 You need: white drawing sheet, 15 by 21 cm (A5 size) pencil ruler eraser markers This is a great lesson for the beginning of the school: a name tag in the style of painter Paul Klee. This drawing can also be used for the birthday calendar that each group makes at the beginning of the school year. Paul Klee Paul Klee (1879 – 1940) is a German/Swiss painter. Quadratic Functions How can you tell, by LOOKING at a quadratic function, if the vertex is going to be considered 'minimum' or 'maximum' and what exactly is the difference between the two vocabulary words? Well, if you stop and thought about the two words, you just might be able to come up with a logical conclusion. Since a parabola is a U-shape, let's take a look at what this shape looks like in a drawing again and see if you can come up with a conclusion all on your own. Okay, now think of the two words: minimum and maximum.

{Valentines day} pixelated popup card I‘ve been scratching my head trying to come up with a card for my hubby {AKA the non-romantic type}. I finally decided to make this pixely popup heart card! They are really minimal (which I love) and take about 20 minutes to make (that includes the card, insert and envelope). You can even make some pixely confetti to put inside the card (if you are a big kid like me!). Full instructions and printable templates below!

Ben Carson Benjamin Solomon "Ben" Carson, Sr. (born September 18, 1951) is a retired surgeon. Born in Detroit, Michigan, and a graduate of Yale University and the University of Michigan Medical School, Carson has authored numerous books on his medical career and political stances, and was the subject of a television drama film in 2009. He was the Director of Pediatric Neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Maryland from 1984 until his retirement in 2013. Early life and education

The High Cost of Neuromyths in Education Valid neuroscience research is an increasingly useful resource for guiding interventions in education. But not all "neurocontent" is created equal. With the overall rise in accessible education content has come a rise in the niche of neurological educational content -- content developed for educators based on how the brain works. One of the more common snags here is the advent of "neuromyths," or content purportedly based on neuroscience that, while sounding plausible, is incorrect. Neuromyths result from unsupported claims about interventions or products supposedly "proven by neuroscience research." These claims (usually with interventions for sale) are based on research that is either not scientifically valid or not supportive of the specific intervention being promoted.

Photographer Laurent Lavender Plays with the Moon In his ongoing series of photos titled Moon Games, French photographer Laurent Lavender has subjects play with a rising moon, effectively tansforming it into a balloon, a painting, and even a scoop of ice cream. The dreamlike photos have been turned into a calendar and a (French-only) book of poetry as well as a few other objects. You can see more of his work over on Facebook. (via IFLScience)

Hi and welcome to my 30th gems post. This is where I share some of the best teaching ideas I've seen on Twitter. 1. Construction Comics Back in Gems 4 I featured Paul Collins' (@mrprcollins) brilliant comic resources for teaching constructions. In his post he suggests some opportunities to use these resources in the classroom. I haven't taught constructions this year so I've not yet had a chance to use these resources, or the awesome Euclid the Game (featured in Gems 21). Easy Toothpick Painting with Kids If you're new here, you may want to subscribe to our mailing list. Thanks for visiting! Have you ever painted with a toothpick before? If yes, you know how fun and easy it is. If you answered no, then you are going to want to try this simple craft idea with your kids. It’s so easy, kids of all ages will love the designs they can make with a little paint, glue or decoupage, and toothpicks.

Printable Mazes Printable Mazes Here is a free PDF maze generator that can create mazes of various sizes and complexity, including pretty diabolical mazes that include 3-d crossings... Maze Options

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