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Was Ebola Behind the Black Death?

Was Ebola Behind the Black Death?
Controversial new research suggests that contrary to the history books, the "Black Death" that devastated medieval Europe was not the bubonic plague, but rather an Ebola-like virus. History books have long taught the Black Death, which wiped out a quarter of Europe's population in the Middle Ages, was caused by bubonic plague, spread by infected fleas that lived on black rats. But new research in England suggests the killer was actually an Ebola-like virus transmitted directly from person to person. The Black Death killed some 25 million Europeans in a devastating outbreak between 1347 and 1352, and then reappeared periodically for more than 300 years. Scholars had thought flea-infested rats living on ships brought the disease from China to Italy and then the rest of the continent. But researchers Christopher Duncan and Susan Scott of the University of Liverpool say that the flea-borne bubonic plague could not have torn across Europe the way the Black Death did. Ebola-Like Symptoms Cited

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/story?id=117310&page=1

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Ebola: Mapping the outbreak The Ebola outbreak in West Africa was first reported in March 2014, and rapidly became the deadliest occurrence of the disease since its discovery in 1976. In fact, the epidemic killed five times more than all other known Ebola outbreaks combined. More than 21 months on from the first confirmed case recorded on 23 March 2014, 11,315 people have been reported as having died from the disease in six countries; Liberia, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Nigeria, the US and Mali. The total number of reported cases is about 28,637. But on 13 January, 2016, the World Health Organisation declared the last of the countries affected, Liberia, to be Ebola-free. 4,809 Liberia 3,955 Sierra Leone 2,536 Guinea 8 Nigeria

Barbara Allan - Poetry for Students Anonymous 1740 Poem Text Poem Summary Themes Style Historical Context Ebola virus: 9 things to know about the killer disease "It is a highly infectious virus that can kill up to 90% of the people who catch it, causing terror among infected communities," it says. There is also no vaccination against it. Of Ebola's five subtypes, the Zaire strain -- the first to be identified -- is considered the most deadly. What is Ebola? The Ebola virus causes viral hemorrhagic fever, which according to the U.S.

The Black Death, 1348 The Black Death, 1348 Coming out of the East, the Black Death reached the shores of Italy in the spring of 1348 unleashing a rampage of death across Europe unprecedented in recorded history. By the time the epidemic played itself out three years later, anywhere between 25% and 50% of Europe's population had fallen victim to the pestilence. The plague presented itself in three interrelated forms. Ebola And The Black Death May Be Terrifyingly Similar, Science Says History does not paint the Middle Ages as a fun time. Between 1347 and 1352, a vicious plague known as the Black Death ravaged Europe, killing an estimated 20 million to 25 million people — almost a third of the population at the time. History classes have long taught that the Black Death was synonymous with the bubonic plague, a bacterial disease spread by fleas on rodents, but in the wake of the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa, researchers are discovering that the Black Death could have been an Ebolalike virus. I didn't think the Ebola situation could get any scarier, but it just did. In their new book Biology of Plagues: Evidence from Historical Populations, researchers Christopher Duncan and Susan Scott make the argument that the Black Death was most likely caused by a hemorrhagic virus like Ebola, rather than the bacteria related to the bubonic plague. The duo looked at everything from symptoms to the way the two diseases spread.

New Theories Link Black Death to Ebola-Like Virus Between 1347 and 1352, a mysterious disease ravaged Europe, killing an estimated 25 million people -- 30 percent to 50 percent of the population. At the time, people said the disease was caused by a peculiar conjunction of the planets, by a miasma stirred up by earthquakes in Central Asia or by a conspiracy of Jews to undermine Christendom. Many called it the wrath of God and expected the end of the world. The Black Death: Bubonic Plague In the early 1330s an outbreak of deadly bubonic plague occurred in China. The bubonic plague mainly affects rodents, but fleas can transmit the disease to people. Once people are infected, they infect others very rapidly. Plague causes fever and a painful swelling of the lymph glands called buboes, which is how it gets its name. The disease also causes spots on the skin that are red at first and then turn black.

Famous Poems Analysis (Pt. 3) Oh, in the merry month of May, When all things were a-blooming, Sweet William came from the Western states And courted Barbara Allan. But he took sick, and very sick And he sent for Barbara Allan, And all she said when she got there, “Young man, you are a-dying.” “Oh yes, I’m sick, and I’m very sick, And I think that death’s upon me; But one sweet kiss from Barbara’s lips Will save me from my dying.” “But don’t you remember the other day You were down in town a-drinking? Ebola Fast Facts Facts:Ebola hemorrhagic fever is a disease caused by one of five different Ebola viruses. Four of the strains can cause severe illness in humans and animals. The fifth, Reston virus, has caused illness in some animals, but not in humans. Ebola is extremely infectious but not extremely contagious. It is infectious, because an infinitesimally small amount can cause illness. Laboratory experiments on nonhuman primates suggest that even a single virus may be enough to trigger a fatal infection.

Black Death - Facts & Summary Today, scientists understand that the Black Death, now known as the plague, is spread by a bacillus called Yersina pestis. (The French biologist Alexandre Yersin discovered this germ at the end of the 19th century.) They know that the bacillus travels from person to person pneumonically, or through the air, as well as through the bite of infected fleas and rats. Both of these pests could be found almost everywhere in medieval Europe, but they were particularly at home aboard ships of all kinds–which is how the deadly plague made its way through one European port city after another. Not long after it struck Messina, the Black Death spread to the port of Marseilles in France and the port of Tunis in North Africa. Then it reached Rome and Florence, two cities at the center of an elaborate web of trade routes.

Medieval Courtly Love Facts and interesting information about the life and times of theMedieval Knights of England - Medieval Courtly Love Medieval Courtly LoveThe romance of Medieval Courtly Love practised during the Medieval times of the Middle Ages was combined with the Code of Chivalry and the art of Chivalry. There were strict rules of courtly love and the art of Medieval Courtly Love was practised by the members of the courts across Europe during the Medieval times and era. The romance, rules and art of Medieval Courtly Love allowed knights and ladies to show their admiration regardless of their marital state. It was a common occurrence for a married lady to give a token to a knight of her choice to be worn during a Medieval tournament.

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