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Yes We Can - Barack Obama Music Video

Yes We Can - Barack Obama Music Video
Related:  US politics

President Obama turns anti-tax message on Republicans - latimes.com Reporting from Washington — President Obama visited New Hampshire to highlight the next big fight in Washington, as he urged Congress to not "be a Grinch" by allowing tax cuts to expire after the holidays, costing the average middle-class family $1,000 in 2012. In a less-than-jolly assessment of Republican motives, Obama said Tuesday that the GOP's votes against his jobs plan this fall were essentially votes to raise taxes, because one provision of the plan would have preserved the tax breaks. "The question they'll have to answer when they get back from Thanksgiving is this," Obama said. The critique represented the start of a new campaign, begun a day after a bipartisan congressional "super committee" announced it could not agree on a 10-year plan to reduce federal deficits and called it quits a few days before its Thanksgiving deadline. Obama's comments were briefly interrupted by a group of protesters who began chanting as he started to speak, beginning with the words "Mic check!"

La leçon de The Roots sur l’esclavage Aux Etats-Unis, le 19 juin est le jour de l’Emancipation. Un jour férié pour célébrer l’annonce de l’abolition de l'esclavage survenue au Texas en juin 1865, deux mois après la fin de la guerre de Sécession. C’est cet événement historique méconnu en Europe qu’ont choisi de célébrer les créateurs de l’excellente série Black-ish dans leur nouvelle saison, en invitant The Roots par le biais d’un clip animé en forme de cartoon pédagogique. Durant près de deux minutes, Black Thought et Questlove se retrouvent ainsi plongés dans le sud Confédéré, au milieu des plantations de coton et des marchés aux esclaves. Alors que The Roots travaillent toujours activement à la réalisation de son nouvel album End Game, l’orchestre hip hop avait dévoilé au creux de l’été It Ain’t Fair, un hommage soul et rageur composé avec Bilal pour les victimes des émeutes survenues en 1967 à Detroit et figurant sur la bande-originale du film du même nom.

Hell Yes, Mayor Bloomberg. I’m With You. New York City Mayor Bloomberg calls for major immigration reform: The Mayor proposed green cards for graduates with advanced degrees in essential fields; a new visa for entrepreneurs with investors ready to invest capital in their job-creating idea; more temporary and permanent visas for highly skilled workers…The Mayor also announced the results of a study conducted by the Partnership for a New American Economy – a bipartisan group of business leaders and mayors from across the country – that found more than 40 percent of Fortune 500 companies were founded by immigrants or the children of immigrants and those companies employ more than 10 million people worldwide and have combined revenues of $4.2 trillion. and In the last presidential election I interviewed most of the candidates on a variety of tech issues, including immigration. Most of the candidates punted because the issue is so politically charged. The fact is that those immigrants create companies, create jobs, create wealth.

Bloody Sunday 1965 Video - Civil Rights Movement My TV provider is not listed. Why not? We are currently working on adding more TV providers. Please check back frequently to see if your TV provider has been added. Why do I need to log in to watch some video content? Viewers who verify their subscription to a TV provider get access to a deeper catalog of video content, including more full episodes. I am able to watch on TV. This service is only available through participating TV providers. How much does it cost to access all of the video content? Accessing video content is free, however, you will need to verify your TV provider subscription by logging in in order to access all of our video content. Can I watch videos if my TV provider isn't currently supported? Yes! What kind of programming is available if I log in? You will get access to more full episodes than ever before. How often is new video added to the website? There will be new episodes and web exclusives added every day. How quickly does a new episode get added after it airs on TV?

Bernie Surges +12%, Clinton Falls -11% in Reuters LV Tracking Poll; Sanders Gains +13% With Af-Ams Last week, slinkerwink posted this diary highlighting the Reuters tracking poll. Reuters had shown Bernie Sanders pulling even with Clinton nationally following the Iowa caucuses, much like the Quinnipiac poll that showed Clinton only up 44-42. What was the response to this from DKos commenters? It was that Clinton still led handily among likely voters. At that time, she still led 63-34 in Reuters’ "likely democratic primary voter” screen. And to be sure, Reuters is not the best pollster by any measure. For that reason, the “likely democratic primary voter” screen tends to underestimate Sanders’ support — because he does well with Independents. That was then This is now Over the past week, Sanders has gained steadily even among Reuters’ restrictive "likely Democratic Primary Voter screen.” And just for the record, registered voters have remained basically tied over the past week: But what about among Hillary's so-called "firewall” of African American support: Ruh-roh.

This Make America Great Again Song is the Funniest Thing You Will Watch This Week | I Agree To See Progressive group MoveOn.Org tried to inject some humor into this negative presidential cycle by hosting “Laughter Trumps Hate,” a friendly competition “to find the funniest and smartest comedians to take on Donald Trump and the GOP’s politics of hate.” This musical number was a crowd favorite – and we can certainly see why. When Trump says “Make America great again,” when exactly does he mean? Most people picture the post WWII 50s – you know the era of white picket fences, root beer floats and sock hops. Except, as this Make America Great Again song points out, that era wasn’t so great for a lot of people – like women, people of color or anyone in the LGBT community. The humor in this video gets pretty dark – so you may not want to watch this one in front of your boss.

This is how fascism comes to America Robert Kagan is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and a contributing columnist for The Post. The Republican Party’s attempt to treat Donald Trump as a normal political candidate would be laughable were it not so perilous to the republic. If only he would mouth the party’s “conservative” principles, all would be well. But of course the entire Trump phenomenon has nothing to do with policy or ideology. And the source of allegiance? Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump read a poem about a snake at a rally in Ohio to discuss immigration and terrorism. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump read a poem about a snake at a rally in Ohio to discuss immigration and terrorism. [Editorial: The rank nihilism driving the GOP’s acceptance of Trump] That this tough-guy, get-mad-and-get-even approach has gained him an increasingly large and enthusiastic following has probably surprised Trump as much as anyone else. [George Will: The GOP must keep Trump out of the White House]

Trump’s Boswell Speaks Last June, as dusk fell outside Tony Schwartz’s sprawling house, on a leafy back road in Riverdale, New York, he pulled out his laptop and caught up with the day’s big news: Donald J. Trump had declared his candidacy for President. As Schwartz watched a video of the speech, he began to feel personally implicated. Trump, facing a crowd that had gathered in the lobby of Trump Tower, on Fifth Avenue, laid out his qualifications, saying, “We need a leader that wrote ‘The Art of the Deal.’ ” If that was so, Schwartz thought, then he, not Trump, should be running. Schwartz had ghostwritten Trump’s 1987 breakthrough memoir, earning a joint byline on the cover, half of the book’s five-hundred-thousand-dollar advance, and half of the royalties. Starting in late 1985, Schwartz spent eighteen months with Trump—camping out in his office, joining him on his helicopter, tagging along at meetings, and spending weekends with him at his Manhattan apartment and his Florida estate. “What kind of book?”

How Rousseau Predicted Trump “I love the poorly educated,” Donald Trump said during a victory speech in February, and he has repeatedly taken aim at America’s élites and their “false song of globalism.” Voters in Britain, heeding Brexit campaigners’ calls to “take back control” of a country ostensibly threatened by uncontrolled immigration, “unelected élites,” and “experts,” have reversed fifty years of European integration. Other countries across Western Europe, as well as Israel, Russia, Poland, and Hungary, seethe with demagogic assertions of ethnic, religious, and national identity. No Enlightenment thinker observing our current predicament from the afterlife would be able to say “I told you so” as confidently as Jean-Jacques Rousseau, an awkward and prickly autodidact from Geneva, who was memorably described by Isaiah Berlin as the “greatest militant lowbrow in history.” Rousseau described the quintessential inner experience of modernity: being an outsider. But his views were changing.

Trumpology: A Master Class The personality that looms largest over the 2016 campaign did not emerge on the political scene as an unknown. In fact, Donald Trump might be one of the most deeply studied presidential candidates ever. Beginning in the early 1990s, as the real estate mogul dealt with corporate calamities, and until last year, when he descended the escalator at Trump Tower to announce his candidacy, a half-dozen serious biographies have been written about a man who has imprinted himself on American culture in towering gold letters. But those biographies—which dig into Trump’s family history, his early business successes and later financial disasters, his tabloid sex scandals and the television showmanship that saved him—had largely receded into the depths of Amazon’s bestseller list. Now those books—which have not always been to Trump’s liking; he sued one of the authors unsuccessfully for libel—have become precious source material for those eager to explain Trump’s surge toward the GOP nomination.

The Frankfurt School Knew Trump Was Coming Shortly after the Presidential election, a small piece of good news came over the wire: the Thomas Mann villa in Los Angeles has been saved. The house, which was built to Mann’s specifications, in the nineteen-forties, went on the market earlier this year, and it seemed likely to be demolished, because the structure was deemed less valuable than the land beneath it. After prolonged negotiations, the German government bought the property, with the idea of establishing it as a cultural center. The house deserves to stand not only because a great writer lived there but because it brings to mind a tragic moment in American cultural history. The author of “Death in Venice” and “The Magic Mountain” settled in this country in 1938, a grateful refugee from Nazism. He became a citizen and extolled American ideals. Mann was hardly the only Central European émigré who experienced uneasy feelings of déjà vu in the fearful years after the end of the Second World War. I spoke too soon.

How Women in Media Missed the Women’s Vote | City Journal The election of Donald Trump has shaken identity politics to its foundations. Appealing to minorities, women, and the LGBTQ population—the so-called “coalition of the ascendant”—was supposed to guarantee Democratic rule into something like perpetuity. Yet more than one in four Hispanics apparently voted for a man who has promised to build a wall to prevent other Hispanics from coming illegally to the United States. An angry, isolated Rust Belt working class flipped the race card, placing a successful bet on its own sense of group grievance. That last fact especially should be prompting a serious reckoning among Democratic political consultants and in liberal-media conference rooms. No, ironically, the problem is that women in media have spun their own cocoon. Remember: it wasn’t very long ago that journalists were scuffed-shoed beat reporters—almost all of them men. In fact, the medium became part of the message. They weren’t. But the media’s anointed experts on women couldn’t see it.

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