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Introduction to Mind and Consciousness

Introduction to Mind and Consciousness

http://www.thebigview.com/mind/

Related:  Philosophy

Mithraism and Christianity by Acharya S/D.M. Murdock (The following article is adapted from a chapter in Suns of God: Krishna, Buddha and Christ Unveiled, as well as excerpts from other articles, such as "The Origins of Christianity" and "The ZEITGEIST Sourcebook.") "Both Mithras and Christ were described variously as 'the Way,' 'the Truth,' 'the Light,' 'the Life,' 'the Word,' 'the Son of God,' 'the Good Shepherd.' The Christian litany to Jesus could easily be an allegorical litany to the sun-god.

Psychopathy Hervey M. Cleckley, a US-American psychiatrist, probably influenced the initial diagnostic criteria for antisocial personality reaction/disturbance in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), as did American psychologist George E. Partridge.[citation needed] The DSM and International Classification of Diseases (ICD) subsequently introduced the diagnoses of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and dissocial personality disorder, stating that these have been referred to (or include what is referred to) as psychopathy or sociopathy.[1][2][3][4] Canadian psychologist Robert D. Hare later repopularised the construct of psychopathy in criminology with his Psychopathy Checklist.[1][5] Shyness Shyness (also called diffidence) is the feeling of apprehension, lack of comfort, or awkwardness especially when a person is in proximity to other people. This commonly occurs in new situations or with unfamiliar people. Shyness can be a characteristic of people who have low self-esteem. Stronger forms of shyness are usually referred to as social anxiety or social phobia. The primary defining characteristic of shyness is a largely ego-driven fear of what other people will think of a person's behavior, which results in the person becoming scared of doing or saying what he or she wants to, out of fear of negative reactions, criticism, rejection, and simply opting to avoid social situations instead.[1]

How to Develop a Sound Mind A sound mind in a sound body, is a short, but full description of a happy state in this World: he that has these two, has little more to wish for; and he that wants either of them, will be little the better for anything else. – John Locke There are a number of diverse issues that could alter our wellbeing / contentment — entailing aliment, standard of living, workout routines, anxiety, family, and line of business et al. However, the principal aspect that frequently gets ignored is the strength of the mind. Sound mind is the gateway to form / sustain an active and cheerful life. Philosophical Quotes, Thought-Provoking Sayings Related Quotes Hmmm Philosophy Truth Wise Words We are more often treacherous through weakness than through calculation. ~François VI de la Rochefoucault

Philosophy At the core of Aryanism is a precise foundational ideology from which its religious, political and cultural aspects all follow. Aryanists are expected to be able to articulately represent the arguments of this ideology and compare it to any other given ideology, including in debate against hostile critics. To hone skills towards this end, Aryanists are encouraged to debate each other and to proactively seek out opposing presentations (historical as well as contemporary) and offer Aryan rebuttals. Through developing familiarity with each other’s work, Aryanists are expected to establish specialist expertize in different areas of the subject matter and be able to mutually defer ongoing discourse with trust and respect. Topics

Problem With Procrastination? Try Doing Nothing Just about anyone who has ever put off a troublesome task is familiar with one of my Secrets of Adulthood: Working is one of the most dangerous forms of procrastination. When there’s some chore you just don’t want to tackle, every other chore seems alluring. As a friend told me, “My apartment is never cleaner than when I have a writing assignment due.” In Roy Baumeister and John Tierney’s fascinating book, Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength, they suggest the “Nothing Alternative” to this problem. That is, if you want to get yourself to do something, make the alternative to that task to do nothing. This rule was inspired by the habits of writer Raymond Chandler.

Maslow's hierarchy of needs Maslow's hierarchy of needs, represented as a pyramid with the more basic needs at the bottom[1] Maslow's hierarchy of needs is a theory in psychology proposed by Abraham Maslow in his 1943 paper "A Theory of Human Motivation" in Psychological Review.[2] Maslow subsequently extended the idea to include his observations of humans' innate curiosity. His theories parallel many other theories of human developmental psychology, some of which focus on describing the stages of growth in humans. Maslow used the terms "physiological", "safety", "belongingness" and "love", "esteem", "self-actualization", and "self-transcendence" to describe the pattern that human motivations generally move through. Maslow's theory was fully expressed in his 1954 book Motivation and Personality.[5] The hierarchy remains a very popular framework in sociology research, management training[6] and secondary and higher psychology instruction. Hierarchy

How to train your mind to remember anything Josha Foer observed the 2005 USA Memory Championship and won it in 2006He says you can teach yourself to remember a lot of information effectively One of the keys is to associate a word or a fact with other things you remember, Foer saysFoer: "If you want to make something memorable, you first have to make it meaningful" Editor's note: Joshua Foer is a writer and the author of "Moonwalking With Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything." In 2005, he attended the USA Memory Championship as an observer.

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