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Fantasy Worldbuilding Questions

Fantasy Worldbuilding Questions
By Patricia C. Wrede The following list of questions is meant to aid authors of fantasy fiction who are seeking to create believable imaginary settings for their stories. While many of these questions may be helpful or crucial to certain stories, they will not all apply to every story. It is not necessary for an author to answer all, or even any, of the questions in order to start writing, (or to finish writing, either). The idea is simply to provoke people into thinking about the ways their settings and backgrounds hang together … or don’t. Some questions apply to more than one topic, and have been duplicated under more than one heading. The Questions

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World-building questions World-building is common in fantasy and science-fiction. It can create amazingly rich backgrounds for stories, but it can also cause problems of its own. Fortunately, it’s one of many topics we’ve addressed at length over on Writers.stackexchange.com. Writers is a no-nonsense writers’ enthusiast Q&A built by users. 101 Reasons To Write a Journal 101 Reasons to Write a Journal is now an eBook! Click here to check it out Why Even Get Into Journaling? FAQS About Worldbuilding How important is worldbuilding? How important is your story to you? People hear the word “worldbuilding” and automatically assume that the discussion is going to apply only to people who are writing science fiction and fantasy — after all, for everyone else, this is the world they’re going to be writing in, and it has already been built. That’s not the case.

30 Days of WorldBuilding By popular demand, you can now download the Magical WorldBuilder Guide in three easy-to-carry (non-DRM) formats: PDF for printing out at home or reading on a computerePub for use with many fine ereader devicesMOBI for use with Kindles and MobiPocket software.As of 2007, The world-builder exercises are licensed under a Creative Commons license to help you in deciding whether you can translate (yes, with credit back), distribute to your writing group (yes, with credit), sell (not without permission), reprint (yes, for non-commercial purposes), or mirror (yes, with credit back) this useful guide! In October, 2004, I posted 30 days of world-building exercises to the NaNoWriMo discussion forums. These are short, 15-minute exercises that can help you make crucial decisions about your world, and what you want your story to say about it. These exercises have been edited for general use and re-posted here. So, give yourself 7 and a half hours this month-- 15 minutes a day-- to build a world.

Let This New York Times Best-Selling Author Help You With Your Magic System Nearly every fantasy novel has magic in it. The genre is practically defined by its use of magic, and if you’re sitting down to write a fantasy novel (and we know you are, what with our Inkshares contest running right now), you need to ask yourself how magic works in your world. Happily, New York Times bestselling author Brandon Sanderson has written extensively on this topic. Sanderson, author of the Mistborn novels series and the Stormlight Archive series, has created a series of laws for making great magic systems. Template for Creating and Building a New Fantasy Race for your Fictional World In fantasy world building and writing, the term "race" is loosely used to describe a sentient or sapient life form with a similar degree of intelligence and awareness as that of a human. Generally a new race will have shared traits and will be aware of its self and its environment. The way your race interacts with its environment will influence the local ecosystems and they will use the world's resources to better their standard of living and interact together in a social capacity. Creating an entirely new fantasy race can be a daunting task for a fantasy world builder or writer. Having a good design template to begin drafting the various characteristics of your race is important for shaping a well rounded creation.

Twenty rules for writing detective stories (1928) by S.S. Van Dine THE DETECTIVE story is a kind of intellectual game. It is more — it is a sporting event. And for the writing of detective stories there are very definite laws — unwritten, perhaps, but none the less binding; and every respectable and self-respecting concocter of literary mysteries lives up to them. Herewith, then, is a sort Credo, based partly on the practice of all the great writers of detective stories, and partly on the promptings of the honest author's inner conscience. To wit: 1. Fantasy World Building Worksheet Story Title: World Name: What type of world is it: Modern, Medieval, Futuristic? Physical World Earth?

7 Unnecessary Science Fiction Worldbuilding Details - THE GALAXY EXPRESS I’m a subscriber to the idea of “just enough” worldbuilding, especially when reading a cross genre novel like science fiction romance. I don’t require pages of explanation about certain details or in some cases even a sentence. Mainly this is because of my awareness of practical factors, such as word count limits. Additionally, like many readers I bring a certain level of knowledge of genre tropes to fill in gaps or I’ll extrapolate from what’s being described on the page. But those aren’t the only reasons. It seems to me that some worldbuilding details are unnecessary because many are rooted in basic high school science.

Generating fantasy maps These are some notes on how I generate the maps for my Twitter bot @unchartedatlas, which is based on a generator I originally produced during NaNoGenMo 2015. There's JavaScript code for the generator on Github here, and the original messy Python generator code can be seen here. You may also be interested in this companion piece, which describes the placename generation. Inspiration I wanted to make maps that look like something you'd find at the back of one of the cheap paperback fantasy novels of my youth. I always had a fascination with these imagined worlds, which were often much more interesting than whatever luke-warm sub-Tolkien tale they were attached to.

Maps Workshop — Developing the Fictional World through Mapping Most of the books I’ve written have started with a map. Not with an idea, or a character, or a theme. With a hand-drawn map, doodled out first while I was sitting and keeping someone else company, or while I was on break, or when I couldn’t think of what to write and had no ideas to speak of and knew that if I drew a map something would come to me. Some of the maps were fairly artistic from the start.

25 Things Writers Should Know About Creating Mystery 1. Your Story Must Be An Incomplete Equation A complete equation is 4 + 5 = 9. It’s simple. Clean.

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