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Whirl-it lampshade - free DIY tutorial

Whirl-it lampshade - free DIY tutorial
We really needed a new lamp, and we´ve planned to make one for months. This week we finally got around to it. It takes a bit of different materials, but it´s really easy when you´ve started. We recommend making it outdoors, as it gets quite messy. The result is pretty neat, especially at night when the threads cast shadow on the walls. We planned to make the lamp using the yarn Garnstudio Ice, but it ran out really quickly, and we had to improvise by using a thinner yarn to complete it. What we used One big, round balloon. How we did itGather all the materials.Put the yarn into the glue and mix properly. Fill the balloon to a desireable size. Hang it and start whirling. Whirl pretty tightly.

DIY Trendy Hanging Lamp Home design DIY Kids Weddings Fashion and Style FOOD Cool stuff DIY Trendy Hanging Lamp As I mentioned before, honeysuckle is a color of this year so why not to make something trendy for your interior? A hanging lamp in neobarocco style would be a great choice for a DIY project. Such lamp would be a great addition to any modern decor. Materials and tools Sheet of colored PlexiglasCord setPlastic cupDecorative metal chainPink spray paintQuick-setting gluePensilElectric jigsawDrillScrewdriverLightbulb Instructions Find some nice neo-baroque template and print it.Transfer it on the Plexiglas sheet using pencil.Saw the sheet using a jigsaw.Repeat first three steps to get the second piece of the lamp.Carefully remove the protective film from the Plexiglas. share More about creative lamps, diy hanging lamps, diy lamps, diy modern lamps, diy pendant lamps, hanging lamps, lamps, pendant lamps, suspended lamps 12 Comments elsa Says: April 24th, 2011 at 8:05 pm this is wonderful, so creative! Popular:

DIY Tuesday: Rustic Pencil Holder I don't know about you, but I've seen a lot of rustic accessories and tableware popping up all over design blogs lately. The wood cake stand is one of my favorites, and I'm hoping to be able to make one soon so I can share the DIY with you!I love the idea of bringing the outdoors in through rustic or organic design elements. Which is why I was thrilled when my husband made me this wooden pencil holder. The piece of wood is one that his friend found by a river bank. My husband just added a few holes to it, sanded down the edges, and made it into a functional decorative piece for my art room. Click below to get the tutorial...it's super simple! Rustic Pencil HolderMaterials & Tools Needed Hand saw Small slice of wood either from a large branch or tree base (mine is a piece of poplar about 6" in diameter) Drill (with a drill bit size of about 7/16") Sand paper Step 1. Step 2. Step 3. (I told you it was simple!)

photo lampshades PINTEREST UPDATE: This is a post from 2010. I do not take custom orders, only the tutorial is available. The lamps have held up wonderfully. As many of you requested, Marie is sharing a little tutorial here on how she made her lampshades. Marie is happy to do custom orders for those that prefer buying over making! * LAMPSHADE – Hobby Lobby carries self-adhesive shades & nightlights, Target has some smaller lamps for $19 that would be perfect for this project, I’ve found some lamps & shades on Craigslist. * GLUE – I used a hot glue gun for the first lamp. * VELLUM – I buy this in packs of 20 (I think) in the scrapbooking section of Hobby Lobby. * CRAFT KNIFE OR SCISSORS, PENCIL & RULER – to trim the vellum, I used a ruler and pencil to mark the cut lines & then used a craft knife and self-healing mat to cut the vellum. * PHOTOS – I used a free program called Picasa to make the photo collage (I believe this program is made by Google, check their page of programs if you are interested).

Faux capiz shell lampshade Inspired by West Elm's capiz shell table lamp Some of you may remember my first faux capiz shell lampshade that I made for Sunset magazine. It was originally inspired by West Elm’s popular capiz shell table lamp. I was going for the mod look, but I didn’t quite pull it off. Plus I discovered, after two years of use, that the colored rice paper fades badly. The white circles still look beautiful, however, so I decided to redo it in all white. How to make a faux capiz shell lampshade Supplies laminated 24-inch by 36-inch sheet of white rice paper (I bought the rice paper at University Art and took it to FedEx Office for lamination) white polyester thread lamp base slip uno top ring (the top ring of a lampshade. Tools sewing machine scissors3 circle punches: 1-inch, 1-1/4-inch, and 1-1/2-inch sizes (I found these at Beverly’s) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

A DIY “look for less” LOVE! | The Adventures of an Urban Socialite™ Top two images from Honestly… WTF (total cost about $5)/ Bottom image from Oak– retail $372.00 Love this clever project from Erica and Lauren of Honestly… WTF… so much so I might even attempt it– I love these bracelets! The best part is, there are tons of options in terms of hex nuts (they have bronze, steel, etc.) and twine color, size, etc. and the project is super straight-forward. Have fun! Via MCSpice

How to make gift bags from newspaper When I bought something at a store recently, the clerk handed me my purchase in a bag made from a newspaper. I liked it very much and had to make some more—thus today's DIY recycled newspaper project: gift bags made from the Wall Street Journal. You can vary the dimensions, of course, but here's what I used to create a bag that's 5" tall, 4.5" wide, and 3" deep. Stack two sheets of newspaper on top of each other. Cut out a rectangle that's 15.5" wide and 8.25" tall. Fold a flap 1.25" down from the top. Cut two pieces of cardstock or chipboard to 4.25" x 1", then glue them on the widest two panels just under the top fold. Put glue on the outside of the 0.5" tab and bring the left-most panel over to form the body of the bag, aligning the cut edge of the panel with the folded edge of the flap. Upend the bag so the 2" flap is now up. Put glue on both flaps and fold them inward to form the bottom of the bag.

How to make pretty lights... | kootoyoo Ambient light in 5 minutes flat! The jar lights I made created quite a bit of interest. The benefit of using LED lights over tealights is safety & if you’re having an outdoor party you don’t need to worry about weather as the light would of course be protected by the lid of the jar. Edit: I used large jars which were purchased very cheaply from a homewares store but used kitchen jars would work too. If you want uniformity with the the lids then perhaps a coat of paint? The LED battery operated lights that I used were purchased from Bunnings. I’m seriously considering setting up something in the garden similar to this brilliant piece of garden art… freshly installed& 3 months later which was inspired by Margie’s project here. Of course, you don’t really need a how to…it’s a speed demon type project. & because I wanted to try out the embed feature through Google Docs… you just need to click the little icon in the top right (open in new window) if you want to print the pdf.

Paper Flower Key Holder / Mark Montano Difficulty Rating: Beginner Tags If you need a quick 'just because' gift for someone, this is it! It’s simple to make, couldn’t be less expensive and we can all use one. Here’s how: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Supply List Wire hanger Needle nose pliers with built in wire cutter (most are made like this) Hot glue gun and glue sticks Stapler Book pages Fiskars Scissors and Pinking Shears Krylon Clear CoatSmall piece of cardboard

Coffee Stirrer Wall Art Last week, I posted a preview of the simple, inexpensive wall art my mom and I created. Now I’m excited to show you how you can make a one-of-a-kind coffee stirrer masterpieces too! I’m big on projects that anyone can do. And this is one of those projects. Here’s all you need to get started: 1. Additional Supplies: 5. Okay, first things first. So, once you’ve got your palette, it’s time to paint your frames and your coffee stirrers! My mom and I did our painting as the sun was setting, which is always a questionable decision. I was going for the reclaimed driftwood sort of look. Once your coffee stirrers are painted, it’s time to trim them to fit into the frame(s) you’ve chosen. I found the quickest way to do this is to measure one stick to be the length you need it and then use it as the guide for trimming all the others. This next part is fun because you’ll start to see your piece come together fairly quickly. What’s left?

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