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Category:Peerfunding

Category:Peerfunding
This wiki section is dedicated to the topic of "How do we make Peer Production sustainable? Why It Is Crucial that Peer Production Companies Refuse Venture Capital Investments Also read: Podcast: Bauwens, Kleiner, Restakis on Cooperative, Commons-Based Venture Funding Donations-based business model Crowdfunding business model Freemium as a business model To be developed: Ethical finance Social investment and philantropic venture capital Microfinance Social lending Prizes Top 40 Platforms for Crowdfunding Social Change The Open Venturing Accelerator‎‎ of the Hub Launchpad‎, an expression of the Open Venture Movement‎‎ that funds open and transparent companies (see also the proposals for an Open Limited Company‎ form and a (Open Company Sector‎ Goteo, commons and community oriented crowdfunding platform Gittip is a way to give small weekly cash gifts to people you love and are inspired by. Indy Johar on the Open Venture Movement "Our hypothesis 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Key Articles Key Policies More

Top 40 Platforms for Crowdfunding Social Change |  REconomy This post is a guest blog by Josef Davies-Coates and it originally appeared on the P2P Foundation blog. Crowdfunding is a new word for an old idea. The Oxford English dictionary defines it as “the practice of funding a project or venture by raising many small amounts of money from a large number of people, typically via the Internet”. Crowdfunding’s poster child, Kickstarter, launched in April 2009. It wasn’t the first online crowdfunding platform (ArtistShare launched in 2003), but it was the first to become widely known and scale. In just 3 and a half years Kickstarter has helped over 32,000 projects raise a total of over $350 million. But Kickstrater is now just one of over 450 crowdfunding platforms worldwide. Source: Crowdfunding Industry Report So, crowdfunding is big and growing fast. An example of particular interest to P2P Foundation readers might be the story of how Jonas Salk created the very first polio vaccine in the 1950s; it is was crowdfunded and patent-free. web | facebook

The Top Five Crowdsourcing Mega-trends I had my eyes opened to the massive growth of the crowdsourcing industry at a SXSW panel earlier this year. Ever since then, I have been looking for an opportunity to bring more information on this trend to {grow}. I’m fortunate today to have an expert on the subject, David Bratvold, provide a guest post: If you’re not yet familiar with crowdsourcing, it’s a new work process that involves getting a crowd of people to help with a task typically performed by one employee or contractor. While this is a common example, today crowdsourcing extends far beyond simple graphic design and can be broken down into four main subcategories: Microtasks – Taking a project and breaking it into tiny bits as seen on Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (“the online marketplace for work.”). (For a more thorough explanation, read “What is Crowdsourcing.”) As the early stages of crowdsourcing continue to gain momentum, there are a few megatrends worth keeping your eye on. 1) Curated Crowds 2) Quality Improvements All posts

Crowdsourcing and Crowdfunding - The Industry Website Crowdsourcing Crowdsourcing is a sourcing model in which individuals or organizations obtain goods and services. These services include ideas and finances, from a large, relatively open and often rapidly-evolving group of internet users; it divides work between participants to achieve a cumulative result. The word crowdsourcing itself is a portmanteau of crowd and outsourcing, and was coined in 2005.[1][2][3][4] As a mode of sourcing, crowdsourcing existed prior to the digital age (i.e. "offline").[5] There are major differences between crowdsourcing and outsourcing. Some forms of crowdsourcing, such as in "idea competitions" or "innovation contests" provide ways for organizations to learn beyond the "base of minds" provided by their employees (e.g. Definitions[edit] The term "crowdsourcing" was coined in 2005 by Jeff Howe and Mark Robinson, editors at Wired, to describe how businesses were using the Internet to "outsource work to the crowd",[1] which quickly led to the portmanteau "crowdsourcing."

A social history of crowdfunding Many refer to crowdfunding as a “new phenomenon” (or – at worst – the “new bubble”). However, it is not as new as we may think; as a concept, it has been around for some centuries already. The novelty lies in the technologies and the mindset that are giving it a new momentum, technologies and mindset that we will consider in this chronological record of the main events leading to what we now refer to as crowdfunding. We should mention in passing both Jonathan Swift’s Irish Loan Fund, and Dr. Yunus’ project and Grameen Bank, as ancestors and pioneers of the microfinance phenomenon, each of which have histories of their own but which go beyond the scope of this blog’s subject. We will instead consider crowdfunding strictly in its connection with the web, and as a sequence of developments parallel to the growth of the social web. Late ‘90s – 2000: Internet campaigning and Charity fundraising Mid 2000: Kiva, Microlending platforms, and Peer-to-peer (P2P) Lending

Crowd funding Crowdfunding is the practice of funding a project or venture by raising monetary contributions from a large number of people, typically via the internet.[1] One early-stage equity expert described it as “the practice of raising funds from two or more people over the internet towards a common Service, Project, Product, Investment, Cause, and Experience, or SPPICE.”[2] The crowdfunding model is fueled by three types of actors: the project initiator who proposes the idea and/or project to be funded; individuals or groups who support the idea; and a moderating organization (the "platform") that brings the parties together to launch the idea.[3] In 2013, the crowdfunding industry grew to be over $5.1 billion worldwide.[4] History[edit] Types[edit] The Crowdfunding Centre's May 2014 report identified the existence of two primary types of crowdfunding: Rewards-based[edit] Equity[edit] Debt-based[edit] Litigation[edit] Charity[edit] Role of the crowd[edit] Crowdfunding platforms[edit] Origins[edit] Press

A social history of crowdfunding Many refer to crowdfunding as a “new phenomenon” (or – at worst – the “new bubble”). However, it is not as new as we may think; as a concept, it has been around for some centuries already. The novelty lies in the technologies and the mindset that are giving it a new momentum, technologies and mindset that we will consider in this chronological record of the main events leading to what we now refer to as crowdfunding. We should mention in passing both Jonathan Swift’s Irish Loan Fund, and Dr. Yunus’ project and Grameen Bank, as ancestors and pioneers of the microfinance phenomenon, each of which have histories of their own but which go beyond the scope of this blog’s subject. Michael Sullivan is credited with coining the term crowdfunding back in 2006 with the launch of fundavlog, a failed attempt at creating an incubator for videoblog-related projects and events including a simple funding functionality. Late ‘90s – 2000: Internet campaigning and Charity fundraising

Crowd Investing Sites Start Offering Shares in Startups During a “demo day” in Silicon Valley last August, entrepreneur Mattan Griffel took the stage with a well-practiced, carefully timed pitch. “We teach people how to code, online, in one month,” said Griffel, adding meaningful pauses between the words. The startup he cofounded, One Month Rails, will “change the face of online education,” Griffel promised. Such technology salesmanship used to be reserved for a select audience of angel investors, like those who attended the invitation-only Y Combinator event where Griffel’s video was filmed. But starting Monday, Griffel’s pitch appeared on the Internet, next to a clickable blue button that says “Invest.” “Crowd investing” is the idea that anyone should be able to invest easily in startup companies. The new rules are part of the 2012 JOBS Act, a basket of regulatory changes that Silicon Valley lobbied for and that are meant to make it easier for small companies to raise money. Griffel’s company appears on Wefunder.com.

Kickstarter Sets Off $7 Million Stampede for a Watch Not Yet Made But he couldn’t even get a foot in the door, let alone secure any money for what he called the Pebble watch. So he turned to Kickstarter, a site where ordinary people back creative projects. Backers could pledge $99 and were promised a Pebble watch in return. Less than two hours after the project went up on the site, Mr. “By that night, we were at $600,000,” said Mr. As of Friday afternoon, nearly 50,000 people had pledged close to $7 million — and there is still two weeks left before the fund-raising window closes. Pebble is the latest — and by far the largest — example of how Kickstarter, a scrappy start-up sprouted in the New York living room of its founders three years ago, is transforming the way people build businesses. The large amount of money that Pebble has raised — equivalent to what a young company would get in a second round of venture capital financing — also signifies a coming of age for Kickstarter. Mr. But Kickstarter is the biggest. Mr. Mr.

Obama Signs Bill to Ease Investing in Start-Ups Mr. Obama, surrounded by a bipartisan tableau of lawmakers and entrepreneurs, said the bill known as the JOBS Act, for Jump-Start Our Business Start-Ups, was a “potential game changer” for fledgling businesses in need of financing. Among other things, it would allow them to raise small sums from investors via the Internet. “For the first time, ordinary Americans will be able to go online and invest in entrepreneurs that they believe in,” Mr. Obama said in a ceremony in the Rose Garden, as Republican supporters of the law, including Representative Eric Cantor of Virginia, the House majority leader, looked on. New businesses generate almost every new job in the United States, Mr. The bill-signing set the stage for Friday’s release of the monthly employment report by the Labor Department, which has become an important political barometer for the presidential election. “Our economy has begun to turn a corner,” the president said, “but we’ve still got a long way to go. Mr. While Mr.

JOBS Act: Why are Democrats suddenly raising red flags? The Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act (JOBS) had everything going for it. It garnered more than 400 votes in the House of Representatives last week. It had the backing of Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell and was fast-tracked onto the Senate calendar by majority leader Harry Reid. President Obama, he of the veto pen, publicly expressed his support. Skip to next paragraph Subscribe Today to the Monitor Click Here for your FREE 30 DAYS ofThe Christian Science MonitorWeekly Digital Edition And, of course, it had a politically bulletproof acronym: After all, who could vote against jobs? But after a group of Democratic senators – and the Securities and Exchange Commission – scrutinized the bill, its race to the president’s desk has been impeded. Democrats ultimately want the JOBS Act to pass, they insist, but they're looking for assurances that investors will be protected, especially those financing new businesses using social media and the Internet, or "crowdfunding." Sens.

A Proposal to Allow Small Private Companies to Get Investors Online The Obama administration, not surprisingly considering its own success in gathering small donations during his campaign for the presidency, is supporting crowdfunding, a financing model that relies on collecting small sums of money from many people over the Internet. Crowdfunding has the sort of populist, common-sense appeal that resonates with free-market libertarians and champions of the working class. By marrying online social networks with finance, this model offers a more democratic model of finance, in which individuals can directly fund other individuals or businesses that they deem worthy, without going through a bank or Wall Street middleman. It’s the sort of person-to-person (or P2P, in industry jargon) funding that characterized financial transactions for millennia, before our mediated, securitized financial system took hold. But let’s be clear: this is philanthropy. In the case of Kiva, lenders get their money back (assuming there is no default), but earn no interest.

Is This The Crowdfunding Site App Developers Have Been Wishing For? The basic idea behind Bountysource seems easy enough to explain--it’s a crowdfunding site for open source software. But when the site first launched about a decade ago, those were still fairly esoteric concepts for potential users and investors. Even the founders, then fresh out of college, had never heard the term “crowdfounding,” says cofounder and COO David Rappo. The project died fast. "It ran for a few months before we realized this wasn't gonna pay our bills, and we needed to move on and get real jobs,” says Rappo. But about a year and a half ago, Rappo and CEO Warren Konkel decided it was time to focus full time on Bountysource once again. "Nowadays, we can say it's a crowdfunding platform for open source software, and people are like, we get it," Rappo says. Bountysource helped the RVM 2 team plan and distribute the rewards it offered backers and often helps software developers organize and even write copy for their funding campaigns, says Rappo.

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