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80 things we wish we knew before we started traveling

80 things we wish we knew before we started traveling
Photo: Ross Borden Tips from experienced travelers, for newbies and veterans alike. HINDSIGHT IS 20/20, right? On preparing for your trip 1. 2. 3. On talking to airline agents 4. Travel in low season. Bad: “Can you get me on the next flight out – I can’t miss my connection to Europe!” Good: “Excuse me, Barbara. 5. On budgeting abroad 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. Photo: Z17R0 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. On meeting people when traveling alone 20. Photo: casers jean 21. 22. 23. [*Note: Meeting people is never compulsory. On researching a trip vs winging it 24. 25. 26. 27. On adapting to a new country 28. Photo: Barnacles Hostels 29. 30. On food 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. On taking taxis and other transport 36. Carry a “dummy” wallet with some expired credit and bank cards. 37. 38. 39. 40. On staying safe 41. Photo: matiasjajaja 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. Read How to NOT Get Robbed When Traveling in a Dangerous Country for more tips. On health while abroad 50. Photo: anaulin 51. 52. 53. On connecting with locals Related:  Travel and Packing Tips

How to Avoid Looking Like an American Tourist <img alt="Avoid Looking Like an American Tourist Step 01.jpg" src=" width="670" height="503" class="whcdn">1Edit step1Ditch the athletic shoes. White athletic shoes (otherwise referred to as tennis shoes or sneakers) are stereotypically American. Any shoes that don't look like they were meant for exercise will suffice. If you do wear socks, make sure they're dark or match the color of your pants. Flip-flops are also very noticeable as American attire, unless you're in a country like Brazil where Havaianas reign, or Australia or New Zealand where the Brazilian flip-flops are also ubiquitous.

The Universal Packing List - StumbleUpon China Travel Information and Travel Guide Whether it’s your first visit or your twentieth, China is so big, so diverse and so fast-changing, it’s always an adventure. Breathtaking Antiquity Let’s face it: the world’s oldest continuous civilisation is bound to pull an artefact or two out of its hat. There isn't history at every turn – three decades of perpetual development and socialist town-planning have taken their toll – but travel selectively in China and rich seams of antiquity await exploration. With tumble-down chunks of the Great Wall, mist-wreathed, temple-topped mountains, quaint villages, water towns and sublime Buddhist cave statues, China insists on a few requirements: a well-made pair of travelling shoes and a strong stomach for long-distance wayfaring. Stupendous Scenery Běijīng, Shànghǎi and Hong Kong are portraits of modern Chinese wherewithal and ambition, but it's the big outdoors that should top your list. Cuisine Treat yourself by trading your meagre local Chinatown menu for the lavish Middle Kingdom cookbook.

6 Ways to Travel Endlessly - StumbleUpon Traveling the way most people do it isn’t enough. Saving all year long at a job for just two weeks a year won’t let you see the world the way you want to see it. So you find someone to take care of your stuff while you travel the world. You’re all set to see everything you ever wanted for as long as you want. Then you realize something: you don’t have enough money to do it. So what should you do? 1. Couch surfers are a huge network of hospitable people who open up their home to fellow travelers and let them stay on their couches (or floor) for free . In turn, the site lets you open up your home to travelers who want to use your couch. Most programs take safety seriously. Sites include: Couchsurfing, Servas, Hospitality Club, BeWelcome 2. All over the world there are amazing houses that people want you to take care of and live in for free. . Caretaker’s Gazette, Mind My House, House Carers 3. (Work Exchange) WWOOF is short for World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms. . 4. (Freelance Work) .

International Cost of Living Comparisons Phrases in 5 common languages to know when traveling in Europe | Travel tip... - StumbleUpon Traveling abroad this summer? These helpful phrases will open doors and help you gain immediate acceptance. You don't need to be fluent in the language of the country that you are traveling to, but learning some key phrases makes a great impression. From saying hello to asking how much something cost; knowing some important phrases will set you up for an amazing trip. Your pronunciation doesn't have to be perfect, all that matters is that your trying and that means a lot the locals. Here are some helpful phrases in 5 common languages to know when traveling in Europe French, Italian, Spanish, German and Dutch The Basics: Hello: bonjour (bohn-zhoor) Please: S'il vous plaît (see voo play) Thank you: merci (mehr-see) Goodbye: au revoir (oh reh-vwar) Where is the bathroom? Do you have a menu in English? How much is it? I’m lost, can you help me find ____? I would like: Je voudrais (zhuh voo-dray) Some Phrases Just for Fun: I drank too much, can you call a taxi? Can I climb the Eiffel tower? German

The Traveller's Medicine Cabinet: 5 Essential Drugs for the Road - StumbleUpon While out roving you aren’t always (or even often) anywhere near a hospital or pharmacy. But, if you pack these nutritional supplements and natural medications wherever you go, you’ll be able to cope just fine. #1: Kratom The Situation You’re hiking the Appalachian trail in the dead of winter. Suddenly the worst happens; your boot gets caught between two rocks, you lose your footing and tumble to the ground, wrenching your ankle in the process. © Miserlou What It Is A leafy green plant grown mainly in Southeast Asia. Uses First and foremost, Kratom is a powerful painkiller similar to Morphine or Opium. Side-Effects Kratom is mildly addictive, about on par with caffeine. Forms Kratom can be purchased in dried leafy form, as an extract, a resin, or in pill form. Legality Kratom is legal in most of the developed world. #2: Kava Kava Kava Kava A leafy green plant grown throughout the Pacific islands. Kava can help to treat social anxiety or stress, and also works as a powerful relaxant. Oil of Oregano

Workaway.info the site for free work exchange. Gap year volunteer for food and accommodation whilst travelling abroad. How to Be Safe in a Foreign Country Edit Article Edited by Dan Knows All, Maluniu, Jack Herrick, Zack and 49 others While being in a foreign country may be fun, there is always danger abroad, just as there is danger at home. Ad Steps 1Research the country you are going to before you go. 16If driving, be alert to changes in the rules of the road. Tips If you are in a country where political tensions are high, be extremely careful.

Airplane Travel Tips - 100 Words or Less - Gadling Don't take sleep aids until you're in the air - Airplane tip by Melanie Linn Gutowski (RSS feed) on Aug 9th, 2010 at 11:16AM Though it may seem appealing to sleep through those long waits on the tarmac, avoid the temptation to take a sleep aid until you're up in the air. You may miss important announcements, or, worse yet, you may be asked to disembark and wait for a later plane. If you plan to take a sleep aid, be sure to take a seat where you are less likely to block in other passengers, like a window seat or a middle seat. Your fellow passengers don't want to climb over your dead weight in the middle of the night. [Photo: Flickr | mirjoran] Swap shelves in airport bookstores - Airplane tip by Erin Frank (RSS feed) on Aug 9th, 2010 at 10:16AM I've been noticing swap shelves in airport bookstores lately. A few airports, like Portland International, have used bookstores where someone has undoubtedly just sold back that bestseller you wanted, and you can pick it up for less than full price. Hi.

Buyer beware: 10 common travel scams - travel tips and articles - Lonely Planet - StumbleUpon While you’re often safer overseas than you are in your hometown, a few scams seem to pop up all over the world. Repeat the mantra: if it looks too good to be true, it must be too good to be true… 1. Fake police Sometimes also the real police, they’ll demand to see your passport and find something wrong with your visa, but then suggest your troubles will all be over if you pay a fine. 2. On entry into a store, often prompted by an enthusiastic taxi or rickshaw driver, you will be offered a deal so preposterously lucrative that refusing it seems unthinkable. 3. Drivers taking you into town might try every trick in the book, from asking you for an inflated fare to driving around the streets to raise the price higher. 4. You're approached by an extremely genial young man who offers you a scratchie card, no strings attached. 5. 6. More than likely, you've just lined their pockets with more cash than the locals would earn in a month. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Female Solo Travel Tips - Women Travelling Solo - StumbleUpon Are you looking for female solo travel trips? Would you like to know what countries are best for women travelling solo to get their feet wet? We put those questions to our Facebook community as we love getting insider tips from other travellers. While most of my travel around the world has been done with Craig, my first adventures saw me setting off into the untamed wilderness on my own. Female Solo Travel Tips Don’t think about the possible dangers There are a million things that can go wrong, no matter how you are travelling. But, that doesn’t stop you from getting on with your life right? Be Aware Keep your wits about yourself and your surroundings at all time. Trust your intuition It always knows best. Don’t freak yourself out by imaginary monsters, but definitely pay attention to those little messages our animal instincts give us. Walk assertively and confidently When I was in year 9 we had to do a self-defence course for sport at school. Always walk assertively and confidently.

China tourist information and practical travel advice Last updated: 19 April 2014 The travel advice summary below is provided by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in the UK. 'We' refers to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. For their full travel advice, visit www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice. On 1 March 2014 a terrorist attack at Kunming station in south west China killed more than 30 people and injured over 140. The tropical cyclone (typhoon) season in China normally runs from May to November, affecting the southern and eastern coastal regions of China. Take particular care if travelling in Tibet or Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. China is prone to earthquakes. Cases of Avian Influenza (Bird Flu) have been reported in eastern and southern China. Territorial disputes between China and neighbouring countries have caused high regional tension. Foreign nationals over the age of 16 must carry their passport at all times. You must register your place of residence with the local Public Security Bureau within 24 hours of arrival.

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