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The Majestic Plastic Bag

The Majestic Plastic Bag

http://vimeo.com/14221747

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Introducing the Knowledge Graph: things, not strings Cross-posted on the Inside Search Blog Search is a lot about discovery—the basic human need to learn and broaden your horizons. But searching still requires a lot of hard work by you, the user. So today I’m really excited to launch the Knowledge Graph, which will help you discover new information quickly and easily. Take a query like [taj mahal]. Nature Laughs Last At Glass Beach [38 PICS] Close-up view of the colored glass beads mixed in the sand at Glass Beach near Fort Bragg, CA. The photographer noted, “Glass Beach is not an official park or attraction – there are no signs pointing the way to the shoreline.” He added, “In addition to the polished glass, Glass Beach provides an excellent point of access to the rocky northern California shoreline, with the furious waves crashing against the craggy outcrops.”

Beyond the absurdity of a “Texas-sized Garbage Patch” Lies a Larger Menace of Plastic Pollution in the World’s Oceans By Marcus Eriksen, PhD, Co-founder 5 Gyres Institute/Director of Project Development, Algalita Marine Research Foundation Media is sometimes the tail that wags the dog of science. One oceanographer described finding plastic in his relatively tiny Texas-size study area of the North Pacific Ocean, while another began describing these areas of concentration as “garbage patches”. A mis-information frenzie birthed a mis-conception of an island of trash. Hurry, someone plant a flag – sell real estate! Disappointing to the entrepreneurial spirit that aimed to fix it for a fee, there are no such islands.

The Omnivorous Mind — John S. Allen In this gustatory tour of human history, John S. Allen demonstrates that the everyday activity of eating offers deep insights into human beings’ biological and cultural heritage. We humans eat a wide array of plants and animals, but unlike other omnivores we eat with our minds as much as our stomachs. This thoughtful relationship with food is part of what makes us a unique species, and makes culinary cultures diverse. Not even our closest primate relatives think about food in the way Homo sapiens does. North Atlantic Garbage Patch The North Atlantic garbage patch is an area of man-made marine debris found floating within the North Atlantic Gyre, originally documented in 1972.[1] The patch is estimated to be hundreds of kilometers across in size,[2] with a density of over 200,000 pieces of debris per square kilometer.[3][4] The debris zone shifts by as much as 1,600 km (990 mi) north and south seasonally, and drifts even farther south during the El Niño-Southern Oscillation, according to the NOAA.[2] Research[edit] To study the scale of the marine debris accumulation in the area, the Sea Education Association (SEA) has been doing extensive research on the Atlantic Garbage Patch. Nearly 7,000 students from the SEA semester program have been dragging 6,100 fine-mesh nets through the Atlantic over 22 years.

Can the oceans be cleared of floating plastic rubbish? 6 October 2010Last updated at 11:57 By Helen Lennard Producer, Costing the Earth Hundreds of millions of tonnes of plastic are estimated to litter the world's oceans Scientists are investigating ways of dealing with the millions of tonnes of floating plastic rubbish that is accumulating in our oceans. They are a quirk of ocean currents - a naturally created vortex known as a gyre - where floating rubbish tends to accumulate. The largest is in the North Pacific and covers an area twice the size of France. Others have since been discovered in the North Atlantic and most recently the South Atlantic.

The future of UI Synopsis It's 10 years since Minority Report hit our screens. The film's science adviser and inventor John Underkoffler demos g-speak – the real-life version of the eye-popping, tai chi-meets-cyberspace computer interface that Tom Cruise used to whoosh through video clips of future crimes. Is this how tomorrow's computers will be controlled? Indian Ocean Garbage Patch There are trash vortices in each of the five major oceanic gyres. The Indian Ocean Garbage Patch on a continuous ocean map centered near the south pole The Indian Ocean garbage patch, discovered in 2010, is a gyre of marine litter suspended in the upper water column of the central Indian Ocean, specifically the Indian Ocean Gyre, one of the five major oceanic gyres.[1][2][3][4][5] The patch does not appear as a continuous debris field. As with other patches in each of the five oceanic gyres, the plastics in it break down to ever smaller particles, and to constituent polymers.[6] As with the other patches, the field constitutes an elevated level of pelagic plastics, chemical sludge, and other debris; primarily particles that are invisible to the naked eye.[7][8][9]

Plastic Oceans Plastic Oceans has assembled a team of the world’s top scientists and leading filmmakers to produce a powerful, high-end documentary in high definition. This will play a key role in sending out the message. The team is headed up by award winning film producer Jo Ruxton who was involved in some epic programmes in the past including groundbreaking productions such as Blue Planet, Saving Planet Earth, Pacific Abyss, and LIFE. She brings years of experience of working within the BBC Natural History Unit on wildlife documentaries to the Plastic Oceans programme. Accompanied by scientists and engineers, the team will travel to some of the most remote parts of the planet, documenting the environmental issues associated with plastic and its impact on mankind as well as some of the most spectacular animals in the world.

untitled Source: Jouni A. Smed Introduction Great Pacific Garbage Patch The area of increased plastic particles is located within the North Pacific Gyre, one of the five major oceanic gyres. The Great Pacific garbage patch, also described as the Pacific trash vortex, is a gyre of marine debris particles in the central North Pacific Ocean located roughly between 135°W to 155°W and 35°N and 42°N.[1] The patch extends over an indeterminate area, with estimates ranging very widely depending on the degree of plastic concentration used to define the affected area. The patch is characterized by exceptionally high concentrations of pelagic plastics, chemical sludge and other debris that have been trapped by the currents of the North Pacific Gyre.[2] Despite its size and density, the patch is not visible from satellite photography, nor even necessarily to a casual boater or diver in the area, since it consists primarily of a small increase in suspended, often-microscopic particles in the upper water column. Discovery[edit]

Lady Landfill Skyscraper Honorable Mention 2011 Skyscraper Competition Milorad Vidojević, Jelena Pucarević, Milica Pihler Serbia The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is a pile of plastic floating in the northern part of the Pacific Ocean. The San Francisco Chronicle claims that the patch now weights more than 3.5 million tons, 80% of which is plastic waste that reaches more than thirty meters in depth.

5 Mind-Blowing Projects by College Kids College graduates may still have a tough time finding a decent job in this economy, but some students are trying to make the best use of their time in the classroom. We've rounded up five mind-blowing projects by college kids for your viewing enjoyment. Continue reading to see more.

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