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Timelines

Timelines
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Online Dictionary - HyperDictionary.com Learn to Program, by Chris Pine A Place to Start for the Future Programmer I guess this all began back in 2002. I was thinking about teaching programming, and what a great language Ruby would be for learning how to program. Unfortunately, there wasn't much Ruby documentation geared for newbies at the time. And it wasn't very good. What saved me was that I made it really easy for people to contact me, and I always tried to help people when they got stuck. A couple of years later, it was getting pretty good. :-) So good, in fact, that I was ready to pronounce it finished, and move on to something else. It took me another year, but now I think it's really good, mostly because of the hundreds of brave souls who have helped me write it. What's here on this site is the original tutorial, more or less unchanged since 2004. Thoughts For Teachers There were a few guiding principles that I tried to stick to. Another principle I've kept in mind is to teach only one way to do something. About the Original Tutorial Acknowledgements

Phrasal verbs Phrasal verbs (to) eat away: roer, carcomer, corroer, desgastar. (to) eat into: corroer, comerse. (to) eat out: comer fuera, cenar fuera. (to) eat up: comerse, consumir, tragar, devorar. (to) egg on: animar, incitar. (to) end in: acabar en, terminar con. (to) end off: acabar, terminar, ir a parar. (to) face up to: afrontar, enfrentar, enfrentarse a. (to) fall about: troncharse, partirse (de risa). (to) fall apart: romperse, deshacerse, caerse a pedazos. (to) fall away: disminuir/desaparecer/desprenderse. (to) fall back: retroceder, retirarse. (to) fall back on to: recurrir a, echar mano de, apoyarse en. (to) fall behind: retrasarse, quedarse atrás, rezagarse. (to) fall behind with: retrasarse. (to) fall down: caer, caerse/ hundirse, derrumbarse, venirse abajo/fallar/ dejarse engañar por, picar. (to) fall in love: enamorarse de. (to) fall in: desplomarse, venirse abajo/ alinearse, formar filas, ponerse en filas. (to) fall in with: encontrarse con, juntarse con/convenir en, aprobar, aceptar

The Book Surgeon (15 pieces) Using knives, tweezers and surgical tools, Brian Dettmer carves one page at a time. Nothing inside the out-of-date encyclopedias, medical journals, illustration books, or dictionaries is relocated or implanted, only removed. Dettmer manipulates the pages and spines to form the shape of his sculptures. He also folds, bends, rolls, and stacks multiple books to create completely original sculptural forms. "My work is a collaboration with the existing material and its past creators and the completed pieces expose new relationships of the book’s internal elements exactly where they have been since their original conception," he says. "The richness and depth of the book is universally respected yet often undiscovered as the monopoly of the form and relevance of the information fades over time. Dettmer is originally from Chicago, where he studied at Columbia College. Update: Read our exclusive interview with the Book Surgeon here. Brian Dettmer's website

Phrasal Verbs con frases explicativas y traducción. Vocabulario inglés. Aprende idiomas gratis 1. Break down When a machine or a vehicle breaks down, it stops working. 2. Break up/off If you break up/off a relationship or agreement, you end it. 3. Bring about To bring something about means to cause it to happen. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78. 79. 80. 81. 82. 83. 84. 85. 86. 87. 88. 89. 90. 91. 92. 93. 94. 95. 96. 97. 98. 99. 100. 101. 102. 103. 104. 105. 106. 107. 108. 109. 110. 111. 112. 113. 114. 115. 116. 117. 118. 119. 120. 121. 122. 123. 124. 125. 126. 127. 128. 129. 130. 131. 132. 133. 134. 135. 136. 137. 138. 139. 140. 141. 142. 143. 144. 145. 146. 147. 148. 149. 150. 151. 152. 153. 154. 155. 156. 157. 158. 159. 160. 161. 162. 163. 164. 165. 166. 167. 168. 169. 170. 171. 172. 173. 174. 175. 176. 177. 178. 179.

Devils' Workshop - Tech Community Blog Free Translation and Professional Translation Services from SDL Top 10 Fixes for the Web's Most Annoying Problems @timgray: Not if you're in marketing. The world needs more people like you :) I spend a lot of time trying to explain the benefits of a simple design: - easier site maintenance - focuses more on goal of site, rather than "ooo, shiny..." - faster loading time - more browser support - no worry of flash or JS blockers interfering with functionality Usually, it's not the fault of individual web designers, it's the entire industry business model. An agency that sells the client the simplest (and usually best) site is only moderately successful. An agency that sells the client the crazy bells-and-whistles flash/ajax broadband-only monstrosity with full social media integration for two hundred grand can afford to employ more expert buzzwording bullshitting marketeers and grow like crazy. Designers like simplicity, ease of use, elegance.

Bee English Dictionary: Free Online Dictionary of English 200 Free Outstanding Online Classes Take classes online from Yale, MIT, Tufts and other respected institutions for free. UPDATE: Some of the schools have moved the pages for some of the courses, and the OEDb hasn't updated them on their site yet. I checked every link listed. Some have moved and provide a link to the new page. Some have error messages. Some of the links (all at Utah State University) wanted a name and a password. The Online Education Database has put together 200 online classes from these and other institutions. Topics cover a very wide range - everything from Natural Science to Law and Politics. The Visual Arts seem to be missing. The Beginning Online Learning page has some wonderful articles and resources. The site is geared towards helping people find financial aid for college and is a bit on the commercial side in places. 200 Free, Quality Online Classes University Open Course Home Pages: Signing off, Rhiannon Click here for more items like this.

Learn 35+ Languages for Free in iTunes I was just browsing iTunes for poignant Morrissey covers when I discovered nearly a thousand free language courses on iTunes. 926 courses to be exact. Holy Moleskine, Batman! The extensive library of courses span over 35 languages, from Arabic to Yiddish. Each course comes as a convenient podcast which you can subscribe and put on your iPod or iPhone. To get the entire list of language learning podcasts, hit the browse button on the lower-right corner of your iTunes window–it’s the icon that looks like an eye. Then browse to the Podcasts/Education/Language Courses directory. Or you can simply do a search for the language you’re interested in. Here’s a sample list of available languages (with links to iTunes): Don’t forget to check out some of the more unusual podcasts such as: I’ve been teaching myself Brazilian Portuguese with Rosetta Stone, so having access to a free supplemental iTunes podcast is nice. If you liked this post, please share it on del.icio.us.

Phrasal Verb Dictionary To look up a phrasal verb, click a letter in the menu. The formats below are used in phrasal verb definitions.separable verbs: (talk * into)inseparable verbs: (run into +)object can be in both positions: (look * up +) 1. A phrasal verb is a verb plus a preposition or adverb which creates a meaning different from the original verb. Example: I ran into my teacher at the movies last night. run + into = meet He ran away when he was 15. run + away = leave home 2. Example: He suddenly showed up. 3. Example: I made up the story. 4. Example: I talked my mother into letting me borrow the car. 5. Example: I ran into an old friend yesterday. 6. Example: I looked the number up in the phone book. 7. Example: I looked the number up in the phone book. Also try our Verb + Preposition Dictionary to look up standard verb + prepostion combinations. Your personal online English school.

Phrasal Verb Demon. Complete guide to phrasal verbs. Phrasal Verb Dictionary Home > Phrasal Verb Dictionary: Letter R Rack up [Rack something up].- (losses, sales, points, titles) When you rack something up, it gradually increases in number or ammount. Japanese athletes racked up only two medals in Salt Lake City. Most biotech companies are still racking up losses. You may begin racking up points as soon as your membership is approved. Rake up [Rake something up].- (scandal, the past, old grivances, quarrel, filth, mistake, misdeeds, story) When you rake something up, you remind somebody of unpleasant events in the past: Dig up, dredge up I didn't feel entirely comfortable raking up the past but I agreed to support her whatever she decided. Rattle on.- (insep) When you rattle on, you talk continuouly in a boring way. Rabbit on He kept rattling on about her new car. Rabbit on.- (insep) When you rabbit on, you talk continuouly in a boring way: Rattle on Read on.- (insep) When you read on, you continue reading after having stopped. Call up, phone up We've been ripped off.

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