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Devil

Devil
The Devil (from Greek: διάβολος or diábolos = slanderer or accuser)[1] is believed in many religions, myths and cultures to be a supernatural entity that is the personification of evil and the enemy of God and humankind. The nature of the role varies greatly, ranging from being an effective opposite force to the creator god, locked in an eons long struggle for human souls on what may seem even terms (to the point of dualistic ditheism/bitheism), to being a comical figure of fun or an abstract aspect of the individual human condition. While mainstream Judaism contains no overt concept of a devil, Christianity and Islam have variously regarded the Devil as a rebellious fallen angel that tempts humans to sin, if not commit evil deeds himself. In these religions – particularly during periods of division or external threat – the Devil has assumed more of a dualistic status commonly associated with heretics, infidels, and other unbelievers. Etymology Abrahamic religions Judaism Christianity Islam

Om Mani Padme Hum: The Meaning of the Mantra in Tibetan Buddhism Glimpsing a Few More Facets of the Mantra There are many ways to understand the meaning of the mantra. Here are a few of them: The Transformation of Speech [An excerpt from The Dharma, by Kalu Rinpoche, from a chapter on The Four Dharmas of Gampopa. ] "The second aspect of transformation [of confusion into wisdom] concerns our speech. Mere words, which have no ultimate reality, can determine our happiness and suffering. In the Vajrayana context, we recite and meditate on mantra, which is enlightened sound, the speech of the [Bhodisattva of Compassion], the union of Sound and Emptiness. At first, the Union of Sound and Emptiness is simply an intellectual concept of what our meditation should be. One of the disciples was very diligent, though his realization was perhaps not so profound. When the two disciples went to their lama to indicate they had finished the practice, he said, 'Oh, you've both done excellently. The Powers of the Six Syllables "Behold! H.H. top of page

Azazel Mount Azazel (Jabel Muntar) in the Judean Desert, to which the goat was sent, and from which it was pushed. Cliffs of Mount Azazel (Jabel Muntar). Azazel [ə-ˈzā-zəl] or Azazael or Azâzêl (Hebrew: עֲזָאזֵל, Azazel; Arabic: عَزازِيل, Azāzīl) is a term used three times in the Hebrew Bible, which has been traditionally understood either as a scapegoat, or in some traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as the name of a fallen angel or demon. Hebrew Bible[edit] The term in the Bible is limited to three uses in Leviticus 16, where two he-goats were sacrificed to God and one of two he-goats got a lot, reading לַעֲזָאזֵל la-aza'zeyl; either "for absolute removal" or "for Azazel" and outcast in the desert as part of the Day of Atonement, for God is seen as speaking through lottery.[1] Leviticus 16:8–10 reads: Later rabbis, interpreting "la-azazel" as "azaz" (rugged), and "el" (strong), refer it to the rugged and rough mountain cliff from which the goat was cast down (..)[2][3][4] [edit] [edit]

The Knights Templar Anger Management (article) by Gary Smith on AuthorsDen The Knights Templar Anger Management By Gary Smith Last edited: Thursday, January 02, 2003 Posted: Thursday, January 02, 2003 Share Print Save Become a Fan The new secret now being released is the ancient anger management tool utilized by the Knights Templar during the Middle Ages which enhances one's physical, mental and spiritual abilities. The Knights Templar Anger Management by Gary Smith In the early 1980's, my spiritual journey lead me to the subterranean vaults located beneath the city of the Vatican in Italy. In early 1118 nine knights, after spending months in prayer and meditation, were gifted by an appearance from Archangel Michael. And so it was these 9 special knights traveled to Palestine and re-discovered the ancient secret teachings, techniques and prayers of Jesus. The Knights Templar were unsurpassed in battle. Human bodies in the 3rd dimension contain a "Soul". Unconditional Love is the key to Ascension.

Devil (Islam) In Islam, the Devil is known as Iblīs (Arabic: إبليس‎, plural: ابالسة abālisah) or Shayṭān (Arabic: شيطان‎, plural: شياطين shayāṭīn). In Islam Iblis is a jinni who refused to bow to Adam (ʾĀdam). The primary characteristic of the Devil, besides hubris, is that he has no power other than the power to cast evil suggestions into the chests of men, women, and jinn, although the Quran does mention appointing jinn to assist those who are far from God in a general context. "We made the evil ones friends (only) to those without faith. Iblis probably comes from the Greek Diabolos (Devil, Satan; literally, the accuser) but Islam traditionally derived the name from the Arabic verbal root balasa بَلَسَ, meaning 'he despaired'; therefore, the meaning of Iblīs would be 'he/it that causes despair'.[2] In popular Islamic culture, "Shaytan" (Arabic: شيطان‎), is often simply translated as "the Devil," but the term can refer to any of the jinn who disobeyed God and followed Iblīs. G. "Iblis".

Sri Yantra Sri yantra, also known as Sri Chakra, is called the mother of all yantras because all other yantras derive from it. In its three dimensional forms Sri Yantra is said to represent Mount Meru, the cosmic mountain at the center of the universe. The Sri Yantra is conceived as a place of spiritual pilgrimage. Sri Yantra is first referred to in an Indonesian inscription dating to the seventh century C.E. The Sri Yantra is a configuration of nine interlocking triangles, surrounded by two circles of lotus petals with the whole encased within a gated frame, called the "earth citadel". Man's spiritual journey from the stage of material existence to ultimate enlightenment is mapped on the Sri Yantra. The Sri Yantra is a tool to give a vision of the totality of existence, so that the adept may internalize its symbols for the ultimate realization of his unity with the cosmos. The goal of contemplating the Sri Yantra is that the adept can rediscover his primordial sources.

Ifrit An Ifrit named Arghan Div brings the chest of armor to Hamza. Ifrit—also spelled, efreet, efrite, ifreet, afreet, afrite, and afrit (Arabic: ʻIfrīt: عفريت, pl ʻAfārīt: عفاريت)—are supernatural creatures in Arabic and Islamic folklore. They are in a class of infernal Jinn noted for their strength and cunning. An ifrit is an enormous winged creature of fire, either male or female, who lives underground and frequents ruins. Ifrits live in a society structured along ancient Arab tribal lines, complete with kings, tribes, and clans. They generally marry one another, but they can also marry humans. While ordinary weapons and forces have no power over them, they are susceptible to magic, which humans can use to kill them or to capture and enslave them. Etymology[edit] Traditionally, Arab philologists derive it from عفر afara "to rub with dust". Ifrit in Islamic scripture[edit] An Ifrit is mentioned in the Qur'an, Sura An-Naml (27:39-40): In Arabic literature[edit] See also[edit] References[edit]

Belial A woodcarving of Belial and some of his followers from Jacobus de Teramo's book Buche Belial (1473). Belial is a term occurring in the Hebrew Bible which later became personified as the Devil [1] in Jewish and Christian texts.[2] Hebrew Bible[edit] The term belial (בְלִיַּעַל bĕli-yaal) is a Hebrew adjective meaning "worthless" from two common words beli- (בְּלִי "without-") and ya'al ( יָעַל "value"). "A naughty person (Hebrew adam beli-yaal)" Book of Proverbs 6:12[3] "the sons of Eli were sons of Belial " (KJV) In modern versions these are usually read as a phrase: "the sons of Eli were worthless men " (NRSV, NIV) In the Hebrew text the phrase is either "sons of Belial" or simply "sons of worthlessness The etymology of the word is traditionally understood as "lacking worth".[7] Some scholars translate it from Hebrew as "worthless" (Beli yo'il), while others translate it as "yokeless" (Beli ol), "may have no rising" (Belial) or "never to rise" (Beli ya'al). Second Temple period[edit] ....

Tannin (demon) In modern Hebrew the word tannin (תנין) literally means crocodile. Lucifer Lucifer (/ˈluːsɪfər/ or /ˈljuːsɪfər/) is the King James Version rendering of the Hebrew word הֵילֵל in Isaiah 14:12.[1] This word, transliterated hêlêl[1] or heylel,[2] occurs only once in the Hebrew Bible[1] and according to the KJV-influenced Strong's Concordance means "shining one, morning star, Lucifer".[2] The word Lucifer is taken from the Latin Vulgate,[3] which translates הֵילֵל as lucifer,[Isa 14:12][4][5] meaning "the morning star, the planet Venus", or, as an adjective, "light-bringing".[6] The Septuagint renders הֵילֵל in Greek as ἑωσφόρος[7][8][9][10][11] (heōsphoros),[12][13][14] a name, literally "bringer of dawn", for the morning star.[15] In this passage Isaiah applies to a king of Babylon the image of the morning star fallen from the sky, an image he is generally believed to have borrowed from a legend in Canaanite mythology.[16] Etymology, Lucifer or morning star[edit] "How you have fallen from heaven, morning star, son of the dawn! J. Isaiah 14:12[edit] Judaism[edit]

Kroni Kroni in the Akilattirattu Ammanai[edit] According to the Akilattirattu Ammanai, the Ayyavazhi holy book, Kroni was born in the first of the Eight Yukams (Yuga (Sanskrit); Aeons ((English)) with multitudinous limbs each the size of a mountain, and was the first evil to be born in the Universe. He had a fire of ravenous hunger in his stomach, and he drank all the waters of the sea to quell it. When the water was insufficient, he then swallowed Kailayam (Kailash), the abode of Shiva, and then proceeded to devour the entire Universe. Mayon[disambiguation needed], residing with Shiva in Kailayam, escaped promptly and undertook a Tavam (Tapas (Sanskrit); Penance (English)) to receive a boon from Shiva in order to destroy Kroni. Shiva granted the boon, but made Mayon aware of the necessity of appearing in different forms for the successive six yukams in order to destroy the six fragments of Kroni. Fragments of Kroni[edit] Philosophical View[edit] References[edit] See also[edit]

Satan Satan (Hebrew: שָּׂטָן satan, "adversary,"[1]) is a term, later a character appearing in the texts of the Abrahamic religions[2][3] who personifies evil and temptation, and is known as the deceiver that leads humanity astray. The term is often applied to an angel who fell out of favor with God, seducing humanity into the ways of sin, and who now rules over the fallen world. Satan is primarily understood as an "accuser" or "adversary" in the Hebrew Bible, and is not necessarily the personification of evil that he would become in later Abrahamic religions. Judaism Hebrew Bible The original Hebrew term, satan, is a noun from a verb meaning primarily to, “obstruct, oppose,” as it is found in Numbers 22:22, 1 Samuel 29:4, Psalms 109:6.[6] Ha-Satan is traditionally translated as “the accuser,” or “the adversary.” Thirteen occurrences Ha-Satan with the definite article occurs 13 times in the Masoretic Text, in two books of the Hebrew Bible: Job ch.1–2 (10x),[8]Zechariah 3:1–2 (3x).[9] Book of Job

Gehenna Valley of Hinnom, c. 1900 Valley of Hinnom redirects here In the Hebrew Bible, the site was initially where apostate Israelites and followers of various Ba'als and Caananite gods, including Moloch, sacrificed their children by fire (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6). Thereafter it was deemed to be cursed (Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6).[1] In Jewish, Christian and Islamic scripture, Gehenna is a destination of the wicked.[2] This is different from the more neutral Sheol/Hades, the abode of the dead, though the King James version of the Bible translates both with the Anglo-Saxon word Hell. Etymology[edit] English "Gehenna" represents the Greek Ge'enna (γέεννα) found in the New Testament, a phonetic transcription of Aramaic Gēhannā (ܓܗܢܐ)[citation needed], equivalent to the Hebrew Ge Hinnom, literally "Valley of Hinnom". This was known in the Old Testament as Gai Ben-Hinnom,[3] literally the "Valley of the son of Hinnom", [4] and in the Talmud as גהנם Gehinnam or גהנום Gehinnom. Geography[edit] Archaeology[edit]

Lake of fire A lake of fire appears, in both ancient Egyptian and Christian religion, as a place of after-death destruction of the wicked. The phrase is used in four verses of the Book of Revelation. The image was also used by the Early Christian Hippolytus of Rome in about the year 200 and has continued to be used by modern Christians. Related is Jewish Gehenna which, among other things, is a valley near Jerusalem where trash was burned. Ancient Egyptian religion[edit] Richard H. An image[2] in the Papyrus of Ani (ca. 1250 BC), a version of the Book of the Dead, has been described as follows: The 1995 edition of the International Standard Bible Encyclopedia says that the Egyptian lake of fire is too remote to be relevant to the use of "lake of fire" in the Book of Revelation.[4] "Lake of fire" in the Book of Revelation[edit] The Book of Revelation, written some time in the last half of the first century, has five verses that mention a "lake of fire": "Lake of fire" in other religions[edit] See also[edit]

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