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Devil

Devil
The Devil (from Greek: διάβολος or diábolos = slanderer or accuser)[1] is believed in many religions, myths and cultures to be a supernatural entity that is the personification of evil and the enemy of God and humankind. The nature of the role varies greatly, ranging from being an effective opposite force to the creator god, locked in an eons long struggle for human souls on what may seem even terms (to the point of dualistic ditheism/bitheism), to being a comical figure of fun or an abstract aspect of the individual human condition. While mainstream Judaism contains no overt concept of a devil, Christianity and Islam have variously regarded the Devil as a rebellious fallen angel that tempts humans to sin, if not commit evil deeds himself. In these religions – particularly during periods of division or external threat – the Devil has assumed more of a dualistic status commonly associated with heretics, infidels, and other unbelievers. Etymology Abrahamic religions Judaism Christianity Islam Related:  mental disorders in the middle ages: Christian Europe

Divinity Usages[edit] Divinity as a quality has two distinct usages: Divine force or power - powers or forces that are universal, or transcend human capacitiesDivinity applied to mortals - qualities of individuals who are considered to have some special access or relationship to the divine. There are three distinct usages of divinity and divine in religious discourse: Entity[edit] In monotheistic faiths, the word divinity is often used to refer to the singular God central to that faith. The terms divinity and divine — uncapitalized, and lacking the definite article — are sometimes used as to denote 'god(s)[4] or certain other beings and entities which fall short of godhood but lie outside the human realm. Divine force or power[edit] As previously noted, divinities are closely related to the transcendent force(s) or power(s) credited to them,[5] so much so that in some cases the powers or forces may themselves be invoked independently. Mortals[edit] Christianity[edit] Acts 17:29 Romans 1:20 2 Peter 1:3

Azazel Mount Azazel (Jabel Muntar) in the Judean Desert, to which the goat was sent, and from which it was pushed. Cliffs of Mount Azazel (Jabel Muntar). Azazel [ə-ˈzā-zəl] or Azazael or Azâzêl (Hebrew: עֲזָאזֵל, Azazel; Arabic: عَزازِيل, Azāzīl) is a term used three times in the Hebrew Bible, which has been traditionally understood either as a scapegoat, or in some traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as the name of a fallen angel or demon. Hebrew Bible[edit] The term in the Bible is limited to three uses in Leviticus 16, where two he-goats were sacrificed to God and one of two he-goats got a lot, reading לַעֲזָאזֵל la-aza'zeyl; either "for absolute removal" or "for Azazel" and outcast in the desert as part of the Day of Atonement, for God is seen as speaking through lottery.[1] Leviticus 16:8–10 reads: Later rabbis, interpreting "la-azazel" as "azaz" (rugged), and "el" (strong), refer it to the rugged and rough mountain cliff from which the goat was cast down (..)[2][3][4] [edit] [edit]

Magic (paranormal) Magic most commonly refers to: Magic may also refer to: Aviation[edit] DTA Magic, a French ultralight trike wingEurodisplay SR-01 Magic, a Czech ultralight aircraft Computing[edit] Film and television[edit] Literature[edit] Music[edit] Albums[edit] Songs[edit] Nautical[edit] Radio[edit] Sorted by frequency, then by city: Canada[edit] CIMJ-FM (Majic 106.1), in Guelph, CanadaCJMJ-FM (Magic 100.3), in Ottawa, Ontario, CanadaCJMK-FM (Magic 98.3), in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, CanadaCJUK-FM (Magic 99.9), in Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada United States[edit] Elsewhere[edit] Sports[edit] Magic Johnson (born 1959), American basketball player and businessmanOrlando Magic, a basketball teamWaikato Bay of Plenty Magic, a netball team Technology[edit] Other uses[edit] See also[edit]

Devil (Islam) In Islam, the Devil is known as Iblīs (Arabic: إبليس‎, plural: ابالسة abālisah) or Shayṭān (Arabic: شيطان‎, plural: شياطين shayāṭīn). In Islam Iblis is a jinni who refused to bow to Adam (ʾĀdam). The primary characteristic of the Devil, besides hubris, is that he has no power other than the power to cast evil suggestions into the chests of men, women, and jinn, although the Quran does mention appointing jinn to assist those who are far from God in a general context. "We made the evil ones friends (only) to those without faith. Iblis probably comes from the Greek Diabolos (Devil, Satan; literally, the accuser) but Islam traditionally derived the name from the Arabic verbal root balasa بَلَسَ, meaning 'he despaired'; therefore, the meaning of Iblīs would be 'he/it that causes despair'.[2] In popular Islamic culture, "Shaytan" (Arabic: شيطان‎), is often simply translated as "the Devil," but the term can refer to any of the jinn who disobeyed God and followed Iblīs. G. "Iblis".

Transcendence (religion) In religion, transcendence refers to the aspect of a god's nature and power which is wholly independent of the material universe, beyond all physical laws. This is contrasted with immanence, where a god is said to be fully present in the physical world and thus accessible to creatures in various ways. In religious experience transcendence is a state of being that has overcome the limitations of physical existence and by some definitions has also become independent of it. Although transcendence is defined as the opposite of immanence, the two are not necessarily mutually exclusive. Bahá'ís believe in a single, imperishable god, the creator of all things, including all the creatures and forces in the universe.[1] In the Bahá'í tradition, god is described as "a personal god, unknowable, inaccessible, the source of all Revelation, eternal, omniscient, omnipresent and almighty In Buddhism "transcendence", by definition, belongs to the mortal beings of the formless realms of existence.

Ifrit An Ifrit named Arghan Div brings the chest of armor to Hamza. Ifrit—also spelled, efreet, efrite, ifreet, afreet, afrite, and afrit (Arabic: ʻIfrīt: عفريت, pl ʻAfārīt: عفاريت)—are supernatural creatures in Arabic and Islamic folklore. They are in a class of infernal Jinn noted for their strength and cunning. An ifrit is an enormous winged creature of fire, either male or female, who lives underground and frequents ruins. Ifrits live in a society structured along ancient Arab tribal lines, complete with kings, tribes, and clans. They generally marry one another, but they can also marry humans. While ordinary weapons and forces have no power over them, they are susceptible to magic, which humans can use to kill them or to capture and enslave them. Etymology[edit] Traditionally, Arab philologists derive it from عفر afara "to rub with dust". Ifrit in Islamic scripture[edit] An Ifrit is mentioned in the Qur'an, Sura An-Naml (27:39-40): In Arabic literature[edit] See also[edit] References[edit]

Wikipedia entry on mental disorders in the middle ages: Christian Europe Belial A woodcarving of Belial and some of his followers from Jacobus de Teramo's book Buche Belial (1473). Belial is a term occurring in the Hebrew Bible which later became personified as the Devil [1] in Jewish and Christian texts.[2] Hebrew Bible[edit] The term belial (בְלִיַּעַל bĕli-yaal) is a Hebrew adjective meaning "worthless" from two common words beli- (בְּלִי "without-") and ya'al ( יָעַל "value"). "A naughty person (Hebrew adam beli-yaal)" Book of Proverbs 6:12[3] "the sons of Eli were sons of Belial " (KJV) In modern versions these are usually read as a phrase: "the sons of Eli were worthless men " (NRSV, NIV) In the Hebrew text the phrase is either "sons of Belial" or simply "sons of worthlessness The etymology of the word is traditionally understood as "lacking worth".[7] Some scholars translate it from Hebrew as "worthless" (Beli yo'il), while others translate it as "yokeless" (Beli ol), "may have no rising" (Belial) or "never to rise" (Beli ya'al). Second Temple period[edit] ....

Humorism The four humors Humorism, or humoralism, is a now discredited theory of the makeup and workings of the human body, adopted by Ancient Greek and Roman physicians and philosophers, positing that an excess or deficiency of any of four distinct bodily fluids known as humors (UK: humours) in a person directly influences their temperament and health. From Hippocrates onward, the humoral theory was adopted by Greek, Roman and Persian physicians, and became the most commonly held view of the human body among European physicians until the advent of modern medical research in the nineteenth century. The four humors of Hippocratic medicine are black bile (Gk. melan chole), yellow bile (Gk. chole), phlegm (Gk. phlegma), and blood (Gk. haima), and each corresponds to one of the traditional four temperaments. A humor is also referred to as a cambium (pl. cambia or cambiums).[1] Four humors[edit] Paired qualities were associated with each humor and its season. History[edit] Origins[edit] Medicine[edit]

Tannin (demon) In modern Hebrew the word tannin (תנין) literally means crocodile. Arnaldus de Villa Nova Arnaldus de Villa Nova (also called Arnau de Vilanova, Arnaldus Villanovanus, Arnaud de Ville-Neuve or Arnaldus de Villanueva, c. 1235–1313) was an alchemist, astrologer and physician. He is credited with translating a number of medical texts from Arabic, including works by Ibn Sina (Avicenna), Qusta ibn Luqa (Costa ben Luca), and Galen.[2] Many alchemical writings, including Thesaurus Thesaurorum or Rosarius Philosophorum, Novum Lumen, and Flos Florum, are also ascribed to him, but they are of very doubtful authenticity. Collected editions of them were published at Lyon in 1504 and 1532 (with a biography by Symphorianus Campegius), at Basel in 1585, at Frankfurt in 1603, and at Lyon in 1686. Villa Nova is credited with using a Camera Obscura to project live performances for entertainment.[3] [4] He is also the reputed author of various medical works, including Breviarium Practicae. Arnaldus de Villanova See also[edit] [edit] References[edit] See J. Further reading[edit] External links[edit]

Lucifer Lucifer (/ˈluːsɪfər/ or /ˈljuːsɪfər/) is the King James Version rendering of the Hebrew word הֵילֵל in Isaiah 14:12.[1] This word, transliterated hêlêl[1] or heylel,[2] occurs only once in the Hebrew Bible[1] and according to the KJV-influenced Strong's Concordance means "shining one, morning star, Lucifer".[2] The word Lucifer is taken from the Latin Vulgate,[3] which translates הֵילֵל as lucifer,[Isa 14:12][4][5] meaning "the morning star, the planet Venus", or, as an adjective, "light-bringing".[6] The Septuagint renders הֵילֵל in Greek as ἑωσφόρος[7][8][9][10][11] (heōsphoros),[12][13][14] a name, literally "bringer of dawn", for the morning star.[15] In this passage Isaiah applies to a king of Babylon the image of the morning star fallen from the sky, an image he is generally believed to have borrowed from a legend in Canaanite mythology.[16] Etymology, Lucifer or morning star[edit] "How you have fallen from heaven, morning star, son of the dawn! J. Isaiah 14:12[edit] Judaism[edit]

Trepanning Trepanning, also known as trepanation, trephination, trephining or making a burr hole (the verb trepan derives via Old French and therefrom via Medieval Latin from the Greek noun of relevant meaning trypanon, literally "(a) borer, (an) auger")[1][2] is a surgical intervention in which a hole is drilled or scraped into the human skull, exposing the dura mater to treat health problems related to intracranial diseases. It may also refer to any "burr" hole created through other body surfaces, including nail beds. It is often used to relieve pressure beneath a surface. A trephine is an instrument used for cutting out a round piece of skull bone. There is some contemporary use of the term. In modern eye surgery, a trephine instrument is used in corneal transplant surgery. History[edit] Trepanated skull, Neolithic. Dr. 18th-century French illustration of trepanation. Prehistoric evidence[edit] Pre-Colombian Mesoamerica[edit] Pre-modern Europe[edit] Pre-modern Central-East Asia[edit] See also[edit]

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