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User story

User story
History[edit] User stories originated with Extreme Programming (XP), whose first written description in 1998 only claimed that customers defined project scope "with user stories, which are like use cases". Rather than offered as a distinct practice, they were described as one of the "game pieces" used in the planning game. However, most of the further literature thrust around all the ways arguing that user stories are "unlike" use cases, in trying to answer in a more practical manner "how requirements are handled" in XP and more generally Agile projects. In 2001, Ron Jeffries proposed the well-known Three C's formula, i.e. A Card (or often a Post-it note) is a physical token giving tangible and durable form to what would otherwise only be an abstraction; The Confirmation, the more formal the better, ensures that the objectives the conversation revolved around have been reached finally. Creating user stories[edit] Format[edit] "As a <role>, I want <goal/desire> so that <benefit>" Run tests Or Related:  User Story

How to create a User Story Map User story mapping is becoming a popular technique through the efforts of Jeff Patton and others that allows you to add a second dimension to your backlog. Here are a few reasons you should consider using this technique: It allows you to see the big picture in your backlog.It gives you a better tool for making decisions about grooming and prioritizing your backlog. It promotes silent brainstorming and a collaborative approach to generating your user stories.It encourages an iterative development approach where your early deliveries validate your architecture and solution.It is a great visual alternative to traditional project plans.It is a useful model for discussing and managing scope.Allows you to visualize dimensional planning and real options for your project/product. To create your own user story map: 1. Form a group of 3-5 people who understand the purpose of the product. 3-5 seems to be the magic number. 2. 5. T1 T2 T3 T4 T5 T6 T7 T8 T9 (user tasks = skeleton & timeline) 6. 7.

New to User Stories?Written for the Scrum Alliance. A CSP’s perspective on user stories, requirements, and use cases Having coached traditional requirements, use cases, user stories, and agile development, I’ve fielded a lot of questions around the differences among the three major ways of specifying requirements, particularly by people migrating to user stories. To set the record straight on requirements, use cases, and user stories, I will describe each methodology and then compare the three against each other. Traditional requirements Traditional requirements are criteria to which the system or business must adhere. Good requirements have the following characteristics: Complete. Traditional requirements focus on system operation. Use Cases A use case is a series of interactions by the user (Actor) with the system and the response of the system. Use cases focus on interactions and are written in such a way as to succinctly define the user/system activities and data that define the interaction. User Stories A good user story uses the “INVEST” model: Independent. User story–writing process Conclusion

Agile software development Agile software development is a set of principles for software development in which requirements and solutions evolve through collaboration between self-organizing,[1] cross-functional teams. It promotes adaptive planning, evolutionary development, early delivery, and continuous improvement, and it encourages rapid and flexible response to change.[2] Agile itself has never defined any specific methods to achieve this, but many have grown up as a result and have been recognized as being 'Agile'. The Manifesto for Agile Software Development,[3] also known as the Agile Manifesto, was first proclaimed in 2001, after "agile methodology" was originally introduced in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The manifesto came out of the DSDM Consortium in 1994, although its roots go back to the mid 1980s at DuPont and texts by James Martin[4] and James Kerr et al.[5] History[edit] Incremental software development methods trace back to 1957.[6] In 1974, E. The Agile Manifesto[edit] Agile principles[edit]

Splitting User Stories Good user stories follow Bill Wake’s INVEST model. They’re Independent, Negotiable, Valuable, Estimable, Small, and Testable. The small requirement drives us to split large stories. But the stories after splitting still have to follow the model. Many new agile teams attempt to split stories by architectural layer: one story for the UI, another for the database, etc. This may satisfy small, but it fails at independent and valuable. Over my years with agile, I’ve discovered nine patterns for splitting user stories into good, smaller stories. (Note: As with any pattern language, I didn’t invent these patterns, I’ve just observed and compiled them. How Small? How small should stories be? When you’re in a planning meeting and you hit your trigger estimate, pull out the cheat sheet at the end of this article and try a few of the patterns until you find a good split. Which Pattern to Use You’ll often find that you can split a story using several of the patterns. Pattern #1: Workflow Steps Conclusion

Why Buyer Persona Development Should Be a Team Effort High quality buyer personas enable marketing teams to create content that is compatible with the wants and needs of a business' ideal customer. They serve as a foundation for great content strategies, informing everything from blog titles to proper distribution. We know this. However, marketers aren't the only ones who should have a say in the development. While buyer personas certainly enable marketers to create targeted content, it's that targeted content that attracts high quality leads for sales to close and client services to work with. If your personas don't reflect a collaborative effort between all departments, it's going to influence everyone's ability to do their job correctly. Are you picking up what I'm putting down here? If so, we've outlined how to go about collecting the company-wide insights you need to transform your buyer personas from vague to invaluable. Client Services Helps Marketing Consolidate Interviewees Provide a Structure for The Personas Looking for more guidance?

Use cases vs User stories in Agile/Scrum development TL;DR – User stories aren’t use cases. By themselves, user stories don’t provide the details the team needs to do their work. The Scrum process enables this detail to emerge organically, (largely) removing the need to write use cases. Are user stories the same as use cases? When running our Writing Great Agile User Stories workshop, I’m frequently asked “So – are user stories the same as use cases?”. Looking around the web, there’s consensus that use cases and user stories are not interchangeable: My standard answer is that user stories are centred on the result and the benefit of the thing you’re describing, whereas use cases are more granular, and describe how your system will act. Use cases and user stories Let’s start with some definitions. A user story is a short description of something that your customer will do when they come to your website or use your application/software, focused on the value or result they get from doing this thing. Acceptance criteria Sprint planning meetings

The Easy Way to Writing Good User Stories Many development shops have opted to writing user stories over traditional feature/requirement documents; however, almost all of them struggle when writing their first batch of user stories. This is not at all uncommon, just like riding a bike, it does take a little bit of practice (but once you get it – you get it). Writing user stories is dead simple if you follow these simple steps: 1. When writing user stories, using this pattern is a for sure bullseye. As a account owner, I can check my balance online so that I can keep a daily balance 24 hours a day. Pretty easy right? As a account owner, I can check my balance online. Feel free to use slight deviations of this template using synonyms: As a [role], I want [feature] because [reason]As a [role], I can [feature]As a [role], I can [feature] so that [reason] 2. When creating new user stories, always hand write your new stories on a single side of a index card using a Sharpie marker. User stories are suppose to be short and sweet. P.S. 3.

Manifesto for Agile Software Development INVEST in Good Stories (French) In XP, we think of requirements of coming in the form of user stories. It would be easy to mistake the story card for the “whole story,” but Ron Jeffries points out that stories in XP have three components: Cards (their physical medium), Conversation (the discussion surrounding them), and Confirmation (tests that verify them). A pidgin language is a simplified language, usually used for trade, that allows people who can’t communicate in their native language to nonetheless work together. But what are characteristics of a good story? I – IndependentN – NegotiableV – ValuableE – EstimableS – SmallT – Testable Independent Stories are easiest to work with if they are independent. We can’t always achieve this; once in a while we may say things like “3 points for the first report, then 1 point for each of the others.” Negotiable… and Negotiated A good story is negotiable. Valuable A story needs to be valuable. This is especially an issue when splitting stories. Estimable Small Testable

Design Thinking With Persona Splitting user stories: the hamburger method Problems: Story is too big to split and estimate; business users don’t accept any breakdown proposed by the delivery team; team is inexperienced and thinks about technical splitting only;new project starts and no simple starting stories can be foundSolution: User Story Hamburger I’ve evolved a new technique for splitting user stories over the last few months shamelessly stealing repurposing Jeff Patton’s User Story Mapping and ideas described by Craig Larman and Bas Vodde in Practices for Scaling Lean & Agile Development. I think it works particularly well in situations where a team cannot find a good way to break things down and is insisting on technical divisions. It has the visual playful aspect similar to innovation games and it’s easy to remember. Inexperienced teams often can’t get their heads around splitting stories into smaller stories that still deliver business value. Step 1: Identify tasks Step 2: Identify options for tasks Step 3: Combine results Step 4: Trim the hamburger

User stories in VS2010 MSDN Library Design Tools Development Tools and Languages Mobile and Embedded Development Online Services patterns & practices Servers and Enterprise Development Web Development This topic has not yet been rated - Rate this topic User story (Agile) Other Versions This topic has been merged with its parent, Agile process template work item types and workflow. Did you find this helpful? Tell us more... (1500 characters remaining) Thank you for your feedback Show: © 2014 Microsoft.

Lean Startup Lean startup is a methodology for developing businesses and products. The methodology aims to shorten product development cycles by adopting a combination of business-hypothesis-driven experimentation, iterative product releases, and validated learning. The central hypothesis of the lean startup methodology is that if startup companies invest their time into iteratively building products or services to meet the needs of early customers, they can reduce the market risks and sidestep the need for large amounts of initial project funding and expensive product launches and failures.[1][2] History[edit] Although the lost money differed by orders of magnitude, Ries concluded that the failures of There, Inc. and Catalyst Recruiting shared similar origins: "it was working forward from the technology instead of working backward from the business results you're trying to achieve Precursors[edit] Overview[edit] Definitions[edit] Definitions based on The Lean Startup[edit] Minimum viable product[edit]

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