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User story

User story
History[edit] User stories originated with Extreme Programming (XP), whose first written description in 1998 only claimed that customers defined project scope "with user stories, which are like use cases". Rather than offered as a distinct practice, they were described as one of the "game pieces" used in the planning game. However, most of the further literature thrust around all the ways arguing that user stories are "unlike" use cases, in trying to answer in a more practical manner "how requirements are handled" in XP and more generally Agile projects. This drives the emergence, over the years, of a more sophisticated account of user stories. [1] In 2001, Ron Jeffries proposed the well-known Three C's formula, i.e. A Card (or often a Post-it note) is a physical token giving tangible and durable form to what would otherwise only be an abstraction; The Confirmation, the more formal the better, ensures that the objectives the conversation revolved around have been reached finally. Run tests

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Use cases vs User stories in Agile/Scrum development TL;DR – User stories aren’t use cases. By themselves, user stories don’t provide the details the team needs to do their work. The Scrum process enables this detail to emerge organically, (largely) removing the need to write use cases. Are user stories the same as use cases? When running our Writing Great Agile User Stories workshop, I’m frequently asked “So – are user stories the same as use cases?”. New to User Stories?Written for the Scrum Alliance. A CSP’s perspective on user stories, requirements, and use cases Having coached traditional requirements, use cases, user stories, and agile development, I’ve fielded a lot of questions around the differences among the three major ways of specifying requirements, particularly by people migrating to user stories. To set the record straight on requirements, use cases, and user stories, I will describe each methodology and then compare the three against each other. Traditional requirements Traditional requirements are criteria to which the system or business must adhere.

Agile software development Agile software development is a set of principles for software development in which requirements and solutions evolve through collaboration between self-organizing,[1] cross-functional teams. It promotes adaptive planning, evolutionary development, early delivery, and continuous improvement, and it encourages rapid and flexible response to change.[2] Agile itself has never defined any specific methods to achieve this, but many have grown up as a result and have been recognized as being 'Agile'. The Manifesto for Agile Software Development,[3] also known as the Agile Manifesto, was first proclaimed in 2001, after "agile methodology" was originally introduced in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

Why Buyer Persona Development Should Be a Team Effort High quality buyer personas enable marketing teams to create content that is compatible with the wants and needs of a business' ideal customer. They serve as a foundation for great content strategies, informing everything from blog titles to proper distribution. We know this. However, marketers aren't the only ones who should have a say in the development. While buyer personas certainly enable marketers to create targeted content, it's that targeted content that attracts high quality leads for sales to close and client services to work with. It's a linear path to growth and success that starts with knowing (in great detail) who your ideal customers are.

Splitting user stories: the hamburger method Problems: Story is too big to split and estimate; business users don’t accept any breakdown proposed by the delivery team; team is inexperienced and thinks about technical splitting only;new project starts and no simple starting stories can be foundSolution: User Story Hamburger I’ve evolved a new technique for splitting user stories over the last few months shamelessly stealing repurposing Jeff Patton’s User Story Mapping and ideas described by Craig Larman and Bas Vodde in Practices for Scaling Lean & Agile Development. I think it works particularly well in situations where a team cannot find a good way to break things down and is insisting on technical divisions. It has the visual playful aspect similar to innovation games and it’s easy to remember. I call it the User Story Hamburger.

The Easy Way to Writing Good User Stories Many development shops have opted to writing user stories over traditional feature/requirement documents; however, almost all of them struggle when writing their first batch of user stories. This is not at all uncommon, just like riding a bike, it does take a little bit of practice (but once you get it – you get it). Writing user stories is dead simple if you follow these simple steps: 1. Lean Startup Lean startup is a methodology for developing businesses and products. The methodology aims to shorten product development cycles by adopting a combination of business-hypothesis-driven experimentation, iterative product releases, and validated learning. The central hypothesis of the lean startup methodology is that if startup companies invest their time into iteratively building products or services to meet the needs of early customers, they can reduce the market risks and sidestep the need for large amounts of initial project funding and expensive product launches and failures.[1][2] History[edit] Although the lost money differed by orders of magnitude, Ries concluded that the failures of There, Inc. and Catalyst Recruiting shared similar origins: "it was working forward from the technology instead of working backward from the business results you're trying to achieve

The Complete Beginner's Guide to Creating Marketing Personas 4.7K Flares Filament.io 4.7K Flares × I am writing this post to Dan, Mary, Steven, and Rachel—one of whom is likely you. You see, Dan, Mary, Steven, and Rachel are personas, created with a combination of raw data and educated guesses, representing slices of this blog’s readership. A user story is to a use case as a gazelle is to a gazebo My one liner is that a story is a promise to have a conversation and a use case is the record of the conversation. If you think you need one. —JimStandley Very nice. User stories in VS2010 MSDN Library Design Tools Development Tools and Languages Mobile and Embedded Development Online Services Here's What The Average Tech Startup Looks Like Between reading GeekWire every day, watching the Tech Stars Seattle Demo Day pitches, seeing the latest infographic from Gist, talking to Angels and VCs, and discussions with fellow venture backed entrepeneurs, I have lately been wondering what the “average” tech startup looks like today. It is a lot smaller than I had thought. To help answer this question, I turned to the detailed information published on the Tech Stars web site. This is a treasure trove of statistics, listing 104 graduate startups, from the initial 2007 class in Boulder to the Spring 2011 classes in Boulder, Boston, and New York (including 2010 Seattle, but not the Fall 2011 Seattle graduates). Unfortunately, YCombinator and 500 Startups do not post equivalent data on their 350+ similar graduates, but 104 is quite a good sample size.

Agile Requirements Best Practices 1. Stakeholders Actively Participate When you are requirements modeling the critical practice is Active Stakeholder Participation. There are two issues that need to be addressed to enable this practice - availability of project stakeholders to provide requirements and their (and your) willingness to actively model together. My experience is that when a project team doesn't have adequate access to project stakeholders that this is by choice.

Introduction to User Stories 1. Introduction to User Stories A good way to think about a user story is that it is a reminder to have a conversation with your customer (in XP, project stakeholders are called customers), which is another way to say it's a reminder to do some just-in-time analysis. In short, user stories are very slim and high-level requirements artifacts.

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