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Database search engine

Database search engine
There are several categories of search engine software: Web search or full-text search (example: Lucene), database or structured data search (example: Dieselpoint), and mixed or enterprise search (example: Google Search Appliance). The largest web search engines such as Google and Yahoo! utilize tens or hundreds of thousands of computers to process billions of web pages and return results for thousands of searches per second. Searching for text-based content in databases or other structured data formats (XML, CSV, etc.) presents some special challenges and opportunities which a number of specialized search engines resolve. Database search engines were initially (and still usually are) included with major database software products. In more advanced Database search systems relational databases are indexed by compounding multiple tables into a single table containing only the fields that need to be queried (or displayed in search results). See also[edit] External links[edit]

99 Resources to Research & Mine the Invisible Web College researchers often need more than Google and Wikipedia to get the job done. To find what you're looking for, it may be necessary to tap into the invisible web, the sites that don't get indexed by broad search engines. The following resources were designed to help you do just that, offering specialized search engines, directories, and more places to find the complex and obscure. Search Engines Whether you're looking for specific science research or business data, these search engines will point you in the right direction. Turbo10: On Turbo10, you'll be able to search more than 800 deep web search engines at a time. Databases Tap into these databases to access government information, business data, demographics, and beyond. GPOAccess: If you're looking for US government information, tap into this tool that searches multiple databases at a time. Catalogs If you're looking for something specific, but just don't know where to find it, these catalogs will offer some assistance. Directories

Deep Web Research 2012 Bots, Blogs and News Aggregators ( is a keynote presentation that I have been delivering over the last several years, and much of my information comes from the extensive research that I have completed over the years into the "invisible" or what I like to call the "deep" web. The Deep Web covers somewhere in the vicinity of 1 trillion plus pages of information located through the world wide web in various files and formats that the current search engines on the Internet either cannot find or have difficulty accessing. The current search engines find hundreds of billions of pages at the present time of this writing. In the last several years, some of the more comprehensive search engines have written algorithms to search the deeper portions of the world wide web by attempting to find files such as .pdf, .doc, .xls, ppt, .ps. and others. This Deep Web Research 2012 report and guide is divided into the following sections: Bot Research

100 Useful Tips and Tools to Research the Deep Web By Alisa Miller Experts say that typical search engines like Yahoo! and Google only pick up about 1% of the information available on the Internet. Meta-Search Engines Meta-search engines use the resources of many different search engines to gather the most results possible. SurfWax. Semantic Search Tools and Databases Semantic search tools depend on replicating the way the human brain thinks and categorizes information to ensure more relevant searches. Hakia. General Search Engines and Databases These databases and search engines for databases will provide information from places on the Internet most typical search engines cannot. DeepDyve. Academic Search Engines and Databases The world of academia has many databases not accessible by Google and Yahoo! Google Scholar. Scientific Search Engines and Databases The scientific community keeps many databases that can provide a huge amount of information but may not show up in searches through an ordinary search engine. Science.gov. Del.icio.us.

13 Alternative Search Engines That Find What Google Can’t Advertisement R.I.P Google. What would be your first reaction if you saw this? Scared, because your life is completely enslaved to Google. Or, hopeful because this suggests that something better has already arrived? Well, no one is chipping on that digital tombstone yet. But it does not mean that there is no grass outside that fence. These Search Engines Do What Google (Still) Can’t Some are worthy contenders for the second-place medallion while some are just go into those niche corners of the web. 1. Google does good for the world in its own way. Read through their FAQ where they open up about the project and also show you the progress of their planting programs. 2. Open your bag of privacy tools to add Qwant to the collection of no-tracking search engines. Even when you are connected with an ID, we don’t use any cookie nor any other tracking device when you browse the site. Local storage on your machine is used to save your settings and data. 3. 4. 5. 6. Let’s talk about kids. 7. 8. 10.

JournalSeek - A Searchable Database of Online Scholarly Journals Read These Seven Books, and You’ll be a Better Writer Donald Miller I used to play golf but I wasn’t very good. I rented a DVD, though, that taught me a better way to swing, and after watching it a few times and spending an hour or so practicing, I knocked ten strokes off my game. • The War of Art by Steven Pressfield: This book is aimed at writers, but it’s also applicable to anybody who does creative work. Pressfield leaves out all the mushy romantic talk about the writing life, talk I don’t find helpful. • On Writing Well by William Zinsser: Zinsser may be the best practical writing coach out there. • Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott: Before becoming a literary superstar, Anne Lamott taught writing, and Bird by Bird is the best of her advice, broken up into chapters. Save the Cat by Blake Snyder: Snyder’s book is specifically for screenwriters, and yet I recommend the book for writers of any kind, and teachers and preachers as well. Plot and Structure by James Scott Bell: On Writing, by Stephen King: Zen in the Art of Writing by Ray Bradbury:

30 Specialist (and Super Smart) Search Engines Google is widely (and rightly) recognised as the mother of all search engines. But, if you need to drill down your searches by more specific details, do you trust Google to give you what you need every single time? Here’s a collection of 3o vertical search engines which you should have up your sleeve when you need some specialist power. Flights / Travel 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Images 7. 8. People 9. Forums 11. Music 12. Audio and Video 16. Resources 18. Domain names 20. Icons 22. Private search 25. Similar websites 26. All-rounders 27. While some of these are better alternatives to Google and the other major engines, for the most part, the big boys do it incredibly (incredibly, incredibly) well. olly via shutterstock

13 Google Search Tricks That Make Life A Whole Lot Easier You think you know how to Google? You don’t know how to Google. Even the most seasoned Googler might not know every tip and trick available with just a few extra keystrokes in the search bar. The Scenario: You’re playing Scrabble and some dumb-dumb says, “Hey, ‘panacea’ isn’t a word!” The Solution: Just type “define:” followed by the word you want and Google will take you straight to the definition. The Scenario: You want to find out the origin of a quote, but Google keeps giving results that are nowhere close. The Solution: Put your search phrase inside quotation marks. The Scenario: You want bread recipes that don’t list “yeast” as an ingredient. The Solution: After you enter your desired search terms, add a minus sign (-) followed by the words you want excluded. The Scenario: You want to research digital cameras that fall within a certain price range. The Solution: First type in your term. The Solution: Type “site:” followed by the URL of the website you’d like to search.

Lightning Fast Keyword and Niche Research - The Niche Sensei - Niche Sensei Social Searcher 1009 Writing About Your Research: Verb Tense Folks: The posting below gives some great tips on the use of present and past tenses in your writing. It is from the February 2010 issue of the online publication Graduate Connections Newsletter [ , pp 16-17, from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and is published by the Office of Graduate Studies. ©2010 Graduate Studies, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Reprinted with permission. Regards, Rick Reis reis@stanford.edu UP NEXT: Mentors Make The Difference Tomorrow's Research ----------------------------------------- 754 words -------------------------------------- Writing About Your Research: Verb Tense CONSISTENCY OF VERB TENSE helps ensure smooth expression in your writing. To describe your methodology and report your results. We hypothesized that adults would remember more items than children. We extracted tannins from the leaves by bringing them to a boil in 50% methanol. In experiment 2, response varied.

Sentence and paragraph development - Writing for the United Nations Contents A. Sentence development B. Paragraph development C. Topic sentences D. Paragraph unity A. Sentences can be extremely simple or incredibly complicated. However, when you review your work, you should make sure that all of your sentences contain all the necessary elements - at the most basic level, at least a subject and a verb. B. Paragraph patterns Paragraphs should be unified and coherent so they are more easily understood by the reader. United Nations reports often use the following types of paragraph organization: Paragraphs often combine different patterns of development: chronological order used with comparison/contrast, definitions with recommendations and so forth. Here are some examples: Definition Located at The Hague, the International Court of Justice is the principal judicial organ of the United Nations. Analysis or classification Conflicts today are a complex mix. Time, space or sequence (chronological order) Compare and contrast Cause and effect Argument or recommendation C.

Coherence: Transitions between Ideas The most convincing ideas in the world, expressed in the most beautiful sentences, will move no one unless those ideas are properly connected. Unless readers can move easily from one thought to another, they will surely find something else to read or turn on the television. Providing transitions between ideas is largely a matter of attitude. You must never assume that your readers know what you know. There are four basic mechanical considerations in providing transitions between ideas: using transitional expressions, repeating key words and phrases, using pronoun reference, and using parallel form. Transitional tags run the gamut from the most simple — the little conjunctions: and, but, nor, for, yet, or, (and sometimes) so — to more complex signals that ideas are somehow connected — the conjunctive adverbs and transitional expressions such as however, moreover, nevertheless, on the other hand. Repetition of Key Words and Phrases Pronoun Reference Parallelism

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