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Guided Tour: Visible Human

Guided Tour: Visible Human
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Brain Atlas - Introduction The central nervous system (CNS) consists of the brain and the spinal cord, immersed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Weighing about 3 pounds (1.4 kilograms), the brain consists of three main structures: the cerebrum, the cerebellum and the brainstem. Cerebrum - divided into two hemispheres (left and right), each consists of four lobes (frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal). The outer layer of the brain is known as the cerebral cortex or the ‘grey matter’. It covers the nuclei deep within the cerebral hemisphere e.g. the basal ganglia; the structure called the thalamus, and the ‘white matter’, which consists mostly of myelinated axons. – closely packed neuron cell bodies form the grey matter of the brain. Cerebellum – responsible for psychomotor function, the cerebellum co-ordinates sensory input from the inner ear and the muscles to provide accurate control of position and movement. Basal Ganglia Thalamus and Hypothalamus Ventricles Limbic System Reticular Activating System Neurons Glia

The MRC Molecular Haematology Unit Cell Cycle & Cytokinesis - BioChemWeb.org Cell Cycle Regulation and the Control of Cell Proliferation (Cell Growth + Cell Division) Cell Cycle Research - General resource with links to relevant recent literature, news and job listings. (Ion Channel Media Group) Cell Division - Undergraduate-level lectures on cell division. See also the Apoptosis, Cell Senescence and Signal Transduction pages. Mitosis, Meiosis and the Mechanics of Cell Division See also the Cytoskeleton, Cell Motility and Motors page. Cancer Resources A major component of cancer progression is the loss of normal controls on cell proliferation (disruption of normal cell cycle regulation and cell signaling), in addition to other changes involving angiogenesis, cell adhesion, invasion and metastasis. See also the Tumor Cell Invasion and Metastasis section of the Cytoskeleton, Cell Motility and Motors page and the Angiogenesis, Cell Adhesion and Extracellular Matrix and Signal Transduction pages. Labs Studying Visits:

Virtual Body Gray, Henry. 1918. Anatomy of the Human Body Introduction Anatomical Bibliography I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. Master Muscle List Home Page 6 Virtual Tours Of The Human Body For Free Interactive Anatomy Lessons When it comes to interactive virtual views, we have gone to space and around the globe. So, it’s not surprising that we are also going within ourselves on a virtual journey of the human body. One of the finest tools available online is Visible Body. Unfortunately, it’s not free anymore. But you can see the beauty of it thanks to the free demo that allows you to explore the head and neck. If you are disappointed that there aren’t any free interactive anatomy tools, worry not. Google Body You can trust Google to take you everywhere. The Google Body browser is a Google Labs project that renders on Google Chrome and any other browser that supports WebGL (like Firefox 4 Beta). MEDtropolis The interactive website aims to educate entertain both kids and adult on bodily health; understanding the human anatomical structure is just part of the process. For instance, check out the narrated tours on Virtual Body. eSkeletons eSkeletons isn’t only about understanding human anatomy. DirectAnatomy

Ten Recent Advances in Evolution By Carl Zimmer Posted 10.26.09 NOVA To celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Origin of Species, here's a list—by no means exhaustive—of some of the biggest advances in evolutionary biology over the past decade. These advances include not just a better understanding of how this or that group of species first evolved, but insights into the evolutionary process itself. In some cases those insights would have given Darwin himself a pleasant jolt of surprise. Ten significant leaps forward in evolution research in the past decade, as chosen and described by noted science writer Carl Zimmer Enlarge Photo credit: (Earth) © NASA; (text) © WGBH Educational Foundation Darwin envisioned natural selection acting so slowly that its effects would be imperceptible in a human lifetime. If he were alive today, Darwin would be astonished at the pace and nature of discoveries being made in evolutionary biology, including the witnessing of evolution in action.

Neuroscience For Kids The smell of a flower - The memory of a walk in the park - The pain of stepping on a nail. These experiences are made possible by the 3 pounds of tissue in our heads...the BRAIN!! Neuroscience for Kids has been created for all students and teachers who would like to learn about the nervous system. Discover the exciting world of the brain, spinal cord, neurons and the senses. Can't find what you are looking for? Portions of Neuroscience for Kids are available in Spanish, Slovene, Chinese, Portuguese, Italian, Korean, Dutch, Telugu, Japanese, Belarusian, Serbian, Russian and Turkish. "Neuroscience for Kids" is maintained by Eric H.

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