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United Nations report: Internet access is a human right

Internet access is a human right, according to a United Nations report released on Friday. "Given that the Internet has become an indispensable tool for realizing a range of human rights, combating inequality, and accelerating development and human progress, ensuring universal access to the Internet should be a priority for all states," said the report from Frank La Rue, a special rapporteur to the United Nations, who wrote the document "on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression." La Rue said in his report that access to the Internet is particularly important during times of political unrest, as demonstrated by the recent "Arab Spring" uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt, among other countries. From the report: DOCUMENT: Read the United Nations report La Rue also urges governments to eschew laws that allow for people's access to the Internet to be blocked. Israeli newborn named 'Like' in tribute to Facebook -- Nathan Olivarez-Giles

Fast Internet access becomes a legal right in Finland (CNN) -- Finland has become the first country in the world to declare broadband Internet access a legal right. The move by Finland is aimed at bringing Web access to rural areas, where access has been limited. Starting in July, telecommunication companies in the northern European nation will be required to provide all 5.2 million citizens with Internet connection that runs at speeds of at least 1 megabit per second. The one-megabit mandate, however, is simply an intermediary step, said Laura Vilkkonen, the legislative counselor for the Ministry of Transport and Communications. The country is aiming for speeds that are 100 times faster -- 100 megabit per second -- for all by 2015. "We think it's something you cannot live without in modern society. Finland is one of the most wired in the world; about 95 percent of the population have some sort of Internet access, she said. "Universal service is every citizen's subjective right," Vilkkonen said.

Facebook Now Knows What You're Buying at Drug Stores In an attempt to give advertisers more information about the effectiveness of ads, Facebook has partnered with Datalogix, a company that "can track whether people who see ads on the social networking site end up buying those products in stores," as The Financial Times's Emily Steel and April Dembosky explain. Advertisers have complained that Facebook doesn't give them any way to see if ads lead to buying. This new partnership is their response. The service will link up the 70 million households worth of purchasing information that Datalogix has with Facebook profiles so they can see if the ads you see changes the stuff you buy and tell advertisers whether their ads are working. Specifically, Datalogix gets its information from retailers like grocery stores and drug stores who use loyalty discount programs to amass careful records of what their customers are buying. Facebook has put some privacy protections in place to head off a similar reaction.

Beall’s List of Predatory Publishers 2013 By Jeffrey Beall Released December 4, 2012 The gold open-access model has given rise to a great many new online publishers. There are two lists below. The second list includes individual journals that do not publish under the platform of any publisher — they are essentially independent, questionable journals. In both cases, we recommend that researchers, scientists, and academics avoid doing business with these publishers and journals. There are still many high-quality journals available for scholars to publish in, including many that do not charge author processing fees. The author is grateful to the many colleagues who have shared information about potential predatory publishers. The criteria for inclusion in the lists can be found here. A PDF version of this document is available here. List 1: Predatory Publishers List 2: Individual Journals: Like this: Like Loading...

Brazil looks to break from US-centric Internet (Update 2) Brazil plans to divorce itself from the U.S.-centric Internet over Washington's widespread online spying, a move that many experts fear will be a potentially dangerous first step toward fracturing a global network built with minimal interference by governments. President Dilma Rousseff ordered a series of measures aimed at greater Brazilian online independence and security following revelations that the U.S. The leader is so angered by the espionage that on Tuesday she postponed next month's scheduled trip to Washington, where she was to be honored with a state dinner. Internet security and policy experts say the Brazilian government's reaction to information leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden is understandable, but warn it could set the Internet on a course of Balkanization. While Brazil isn't proposing to bar its citizens from U.S. Rousseff says she intends to push for international rules on privacy and security in hardware and software during the U.N.

Icelanders approve their crowdsourced constitution — European technology news Protests follow Google 'endorsed advert' change 14 October 2013Last updated at 06:35 ET The change might mean comments made on Google turn up on adverts Google is facing a backlash over plans to put people's faces and comments about products and places into adverts. The "shared endorsements" policy change starts on 11 November and covers the comments, "follows" and other actions people do on Google+. One protest involves people swapping their profile pictures for that of Google boss Eric Schmidt so his image rather than their own appears on ads. Google said it had made it easy for people to opt out of the system. The search giant started alerting people about the upcoming policy change via banners on its main webpage and in a page explaining the change to its "policies and principles". Google also gave examples of how the "shared endorsement" system might work. Many people protested about the change to Google, and some altered their image profiles on the Google+ social network in response.

WikiLeaks International non-profit organization publishing secret information, news leaks, and classified media WikiLeaks has drawn criticism for its alleged absence of whistleblowing on or criticism of Russia, and for criticising the Panama Papers' exposé of businesses and individuals with offshore bank accounts.[41][42] The organization has additionally been criticised for inadequately curating its content and violating the personal privacy of individuals. WikiLeaks has, for instance, revealed Social Security numbers, medical information, credit card numbers and details of suicide attempts.[43][44][45][46] History Staff, name and founding Julian Assange was one of the early members of the WikiLeaks staff and is credited as the website's founder. On 26 September 2018, it was announced that Julian Assange had appointed Kristinn Hrafnsson as editor-in-chief of WikiLeaks while the organisation's statement said Assange was remaining as its publisher. Purpose Administration Legal status Financing Leaks

We're About to Lose Net Neutrality — And the Internet as We Know It | Wired Opinion Image: moodboard/Getty Net neutrality is a dead man walking. The execution date isn’t set, but it could be days, or months (at best). And since net neutrality is the principle forbidding huge telecommunications companies from treating users, websites, or apps differently — say, by letting some work better than others over their pipes — the dead man walking isn’t some abstract or far-removed principle just for wonks: It affects the internet as we all know it. Once upon a time, companies like AT&T, Comcast, Verizon, and others declared a war on the internet’s foundational principle: that its networks should be “neutral” and users don’t need anyone’s permission to invent, create, communicate, broadcast, or share online. Marvin Ammori is a Future Tense Fellow at the New America Foundation and a lawyer who represents technology companies on internet policy issues. Game of Loopholes and Rules How did we get here? There was a catch, however. There and Back Again Wait, it gets even worse.

The libraries that governments will burn in the future Well he better move the thing away from the coast or global warming will make his argument mute. I get where he's coming from,make it politically and socially costly to censor or control the contents.That might work if today's political climate and what is or is not socially acceptable and worthy of protection and preservation remain reasonably constant. But who can say what will be worthy,acceptable or even cared about a century from now.That said if you look at this as a concept where the contents vary with the times we should hope it holds true even a century or more from now.If it doesn't then that means the government,the country,and what is or is not acceptable or resistible will have changed dramatically and probably for the worse. When it not longer becomes politically and/or socially costly to censor or destroy cultural material it become dystopia,it becomes analgious to Nazi Germany,Communist USSR or even today's China or North Korea.

The Ninth Circuit Library "Citations are the cornerstone upon which judicial opinions and law review articles stand....The ability to check citations and verify that citations to the original sources are accurate is integral to ensuring accurate characterizations of sources and determining where a researcher found information. However, accurate citations do not always mean that a future researcher will be able to find the exact same information as the original researcher. Citations to disappearing websites cause problems for legal researchers." Raizel Liebler & June Liebert, Something Rotten in the State of Legal Citation: The Life Span of a United States Supreme Court Citation Containing an Internet Link (1996-2010), 15 YALE J.L. & TECH. 273, 275 (2013), available at The following table lists Ninth Circuit opinions issued from 2008 to the present that cite to Internet addresses (URLs). Click here to submit corrections.

Google wins book-scanning case: judge finds “fair use,” cites many benefits Google has won a resounding victory in its eight-year copyright battle with the Authors Guild over the search giant’s controversial decision to scan more than 20 million books from libraries and make them available on the internet. In a ruling (embedded below) issued Thursday morning in New York, US Circuit Judge Denny Chin said the book scanning amounted to fair use because it was “highly transformative” and because it didn’t harm the market for the original work. “Google Books provides significant public benefits,” Chin wrote, describing it as “an essential research tool” and noting that the scanning service has expanded literary access for the blind and helped preserve the text of old books from physical decay. Chin also rejected the theory that Google was depriving authors of income, noting that the company does not sell the scans or make whole copies of books available. “This has been a long road and we are absolutely delighted with today’s judgement.

Will net neutrality ruling make Web like cable TV? Internet service providers are no longer required to treat all kinds of Web activity equally, a federal appeals court ruled Tuesday in a decision that could dramatically reshape online access. The decision overturns key parts of the Federal Communications Commission's net neutrality regulations, which barred Internet providers from restricting speeds or even blocking visits to different sites. Analysts say the ruling could allow Internet providers to slow down sites like bandwidth-heavy Netflix or Google and force them - or their visitors - to pay for faster access. Verizon, which brought the case to the U.S. Judges said although the FCC has oversight of how Internet providers manage traffic, its regulations were overreaching considering the agency classified broadband providers as "information services" companies rather than telecom companies, which "exempts them from treatment as common carriers." 'Alarming' decision "The D.C. But the changes could affect far more than the tech world.

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