background preloader

How Finland broke every rule — and created a top school system

How Finland broke every rule — and created a top school system
Spend five minutes in Jussi Hietava’s fourth-grade math class in remote, rural Finland, and you may learn all you need to know about education reform – if you want results, try doing the opposite of what American “education reformers” think we should do in classrooms. Instead of control, competition, stress, standardized testing, screen-based schools and loosened teacher qualifications, try warmth, collaboration, and highly professionalized, teacher-led encouragement and assessment. At the University of Eastern Finland’s Normaalikoulu teacher training school in Joensuu, Finland, you can see Hietava’s students enjoying the cutting-edge concept of “personalized learning.” Related: What high-performing countries have to teach us about teacher training But this is not a tale of classroom computers. While the school has the latest technology, there isn’t a tablet or smartphone in sight, just a smart board and a teacher’s desktop. Related: Ranking countries by worst students

http://hechingerreport.org/how-finland-broke-every-rule-and-created-a-top-school-system/

Related:  Thinking on Future of EducationEducation SystemTeachingcochener

How this STEM school is shattering stereotypes - Feb. 9, 2016 In fact, the school was launched to do just the opposite. "Our emphasis is on learning versus teaching," said Dr. Ellis Crasnow, the school's director. "Our students learn by doing, experiencing and constructing rather than just sitting in a classroom listening to a teacher." School Start Time & Sleep- National Sleep Foundation Video production in partnership with "Early to bed, early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise," said Ben Franklin. But does this adage apply to teens? Research in the 1990s found that later sleep and wake patterns among adolescents are biologically determined; the natural tendency for teenagers is to stay up late at night and wake up later in the morning. This research indicates that school bells that ring as early as 7:00 a.m. in many parts of the country stand in stark contrast with adolescents' sleep patterns and needs.

15 inspiring quotes chosen by teachers, for teachers “Motivation, creativity and freedom are my most powerful educational tools,” says Cyprus teacher Evanthia Poyiatzi. To sharpen your motivation, creativity and freedom this week, read (and share!) the 15 inspiring ideas and quotes below — handpicked for you by Evanthia and her fellow TED-Ed Innovative Educators: Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. “For the mind does not require filling like a bottle, but rather, like wood, it only requires kindling to create in it an impulse to think independently and an ardent desire for the truth.” — Plutarch 11 Ways Finland’s Education System Shows Us that “Less is More”. When I left my 7th grade math classroom for my Fulbright research assignment in Finland I thought I would come back from this experience with more inspiring, engaging, innovative lessons. I expected to have great new ideas on how to teach my mathematics curriculum and I would revamp my lessons so that I could include more curriculum, more math and get students to think more, talk more and do more math. This drive to do more and More and MORE is a state of existence for most teachers in the US….it is engrained in us from day one. There is a constant pressure to push our students to the next level to have them do bigger and better things.

A warning to college profs from a high school teacher For more than a decade now we have heard that the high-stakes testing obsession in K-12 education that began with the enactment of No Child Left Behind 11 years ago has resulted in high school graduates who don’t think as analytically or as broadly as they should because so much emphasis has been placed on passing standardized tests. Here, an award-winning high school teacher who just retired, Kenneth Bernstein, warns college professors what they are up against. Bernstein, who lives near Washington, D.C. serves as a peer reviewer for educational journals and publishers, and he is nationally known as the blogger “teacherken.” His e-mail address is kber@earthlink.net. This appeared in Academe, the journal of the American Association of University Professors.

Future Tense: Adapting Canadian Education Systems for the 21St Century - Action Canada Task Force: Félix-Antoine Boudreault, James Haga, Ben Paylor, Annie Sabourin, Samira Thomas, Clifton van der Linden Advisor: Rae Hull Canadian education systems rank among the best in the world, resulting in a highly-skilled labour force and competitive industries. However, the challenges associated with the twenty-first century have placed new demands on Canada and, by extension, Canadian education systems. In particular, these systems are now tasked with educating a generation that faces an unprecedented pace of social, economic, and technological change. In an effort to equip students with the skills and knowledge necessary to prosper in such an environment, provincial governments across Canada have begun to implement education strategies that focus on developing specific competencies which collectively fall under the rubric of 21st century learning.

Homework is wrecking our kids: The research is clear, let’s ban elementary homework “There is no evidence that any amount of homework improves the academic performance of elementary students.” This statement, by homework research guru Harris Cooper, of Duke University, is startling to hear, no matter which side of the homework debate you’re on. Can it be true that the hours of lost playtime, power struggles and tears are all for naught? That millions of families go through a nightly ritual that doesn’t help? Homework is such an accepted practice, it’s hard for most adults to even question its value.

The Finnish National Board of Education - Education system Equal opportunities to high-quality education The main objective of Finnish education policy is to offer all citizens equal opportunities to receive education. The structure of the education system reflects these principles. The system is highly permeable, that is, there are no dead-ends preventing progression to higher levels of education. The focus in education is on learning rather than testing. Can Design Thinking Help Schools Find New Solutions to Old Problems? Principal Kamar Samuels had a problem: how to reach the most disaffected students at Bronx Writing Academy, a middle school serving mostly low-income students. The usual discipline methods weren’t working and Samuels knew that if he could figure out how to engage his toughest students, he’d have a playbook to reach them all. So, he decided to make those students his focus group, asking them what they liked about school, and really listened to the answers. That technique is part of a user-centered design approach he’s trying out in order to tackle some of the age-old problems in education, like low achievement for Latino and African-American boys, with a new lens.

What’s standing in the way of change in education? What’s standing in the way of change in education? What’s Standing in the Way of Change in Education? – Barriers, recommendations and analysis: www.cea-ace.ca/CalgarySummary What’s Standing in the Way of Change? The Warm Demander: An Equity Approach Recently, I was talking with a high school student about his frustrations with a first-year teacher. The student said, "I like [the teacher] because he's understanding, but he doesn't require enough discipline. He tells us to stop talking, but he doesn't really do anything to stop it. If I say, 'I forgot my homework,' he extends the deadline, and he keeps extending it, so I don't bother doing it.

Related: