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20 Things I Learned About Browsers and the Web

20 Things I Learned About Browsers and the Web
IllustrationChristoph Niemann Writers/EditorsMin Li Chan, Fritz Holznagel, Michael Krantz Project CuratorMin Li Chan & The Google Chrome Team DesignFiPaul Truong DevelopmentFi Very Special Thanks To Brian Rakowski, Ian Fette, Chris DiBona, Alex Russell, Erik Kay, Jim Roskind, Mike Belshe, Dimitri Glazkov, Henry Bridge, Gregor Hochmuth, Jeffrey Chang, Mark Larson, Aaron Boodman, Wieland Holfelder, Jochen Eisinger, Bernhard Bauer, Adam Barth, Cory Ferreria, Erik Arvidsson, John Abd-Malek, Carlos Pizano, Justin Schuh, Wan-Teh Chang, Vangelis Kokkevis, Mike Jazayeri, Brad Chen, Darin Fisher, Johanna Wittig, Maxim Lobanov, Marion Fabing Nicolas, Jana Vorechovska, Daniele De Santis, Laura van Nigtevegt, Wojtek Cyprys, Dudley Carr, Richard Rabbat, Ji Lee, Glen Murphy, Valdean Klump, Aaron Koblin, Paul Irish, John Fu, Chris Wright, Sarah Nahm, Christos Apartoglou, Meredith Papp, Eric Antonow, Eitan Bencuya, Jay Nancarrow, Ben Lee, Gina Weakley, Linus Upson, Sundar Pichai & The Google Chrome Team Related:  Google etc...

View and manage form responses - Drive Help View responses Once you’ve created your form and sent it to recipients, you’re able to view the responses you’ve received in three different ways: as a summary of responses, in a separate spreadsheet, or as a downloaded CSV. If you’d like a broad overview of how your group of respondents answered each question, viewing the summary is the way to go. If you’d prefer a fine-grained perspective on all the data you’ve collected with your form, you’ll likely want to view the responses in a spreadsheet or download a CSV with response data. View the summary of responses To quickly see how many users filled out a form and what their responses are, you can check out the response summary. If you'd like respondents to be able to see this same summary of responses, check the box in the "Confirmation page" section of your form labeled Publish and show a link to the results of this form. View form responses in a spreadsheet Download responses as a CSV Manage responses Monitor for multiple submissions

World Wonders Project – Cultural Institute The World Wonders Project is a valuable resource for students and scholars who can now virtually discover some of the most famous sites on earth. The project offers an innovative way to teach history and geography to students of primary and secondary schools all over the world. Feel free to download these educational packages for your classroom use. Teacher guides Primary school Download guide (PDF ~350 KB) Secondary school Download guide (PDF ~350 KB) Secondary school history topics Hiroshima Peace Memorial Second World War, beginning of the atomic era Download pack (ZIP ~3.5 MB) Pompei, Herculaneum and Torre Annunziata How the Romans lived Download pack (ZIP ~3.5 MB) Liverpool – Maritime Mercantile City Industrial revolution, international slave trade Download pack (ZIP ~3.3 MB) Palace of Versailles Absolute monarchism, architecture and history of the Palace of Versailles Download pack (ZIP ~3.9 MB) Florence Italian Renaissance Download pack (ZIP ~3.4 MB) Independence Hall Download pack (ZIP ~4 MB)

The New Big Data Top scientists from companies such as Google and Yahoo are gathered alongside leading academics at the 17th Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (KDD) in San Diego this week. They will present the latest techniques for wresting insights from the deluge of data produced nowadays, and for making sense of information that comes in a wider variety of forms than ever before. Twenty years ago, the only people who cared about so-called “big data”—the only ones who had enormous data sets and the motivation to try to process them—were members of the scientific community, says Usama Fayyad, executive chair of ACM’s Special Interest Group on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining and former chief data officer at Yahoo. Even then, the results of data mining were impressive. “We were able to solve significant scientific problems that were standing in the field for 30-plus years,” Fayyad says.

Getting Real Here are the 16 chapters and 91 essays that make up the book. Introduction chapter 1 What is Getting Real?A smaller, faster, better way to build software About 37signalsOur small team creates simple, focused software Caveats, disclaimers, and other preemptive strikesResponses to some complaints we hear The Starting Line chapter 2 Build LessUnderdo your competition What's Your Problem? Stay Lean chapter 3 Less MassThe leaner you are, the easier it is to change Lower Your Cost of ChangeStay flexible by reducing obstacles to change The Three MusketeersUse a team of three for version 1.0 Embrace ConstraintsLet limitations guide you to creative solutions Be YourselfDifferentiate yourself from bigger companies by being personal and friendly Priorities chapter 4 What's the big idea? Feature Selection chapter 5 Process chapter 6 The Organization chapter 7 Staffing chapter 8 Interface Design chapter 9 Code chapter 10 Words chapter 11 Pricing and Signup chapter 12 Promotion chapter 13 Support chapter 14

TechCrunch Overview - Welcome to Flubaroo The grades created by Flubaroo will be located in an adjacent worksheet called "Grades", as shown: For each submission, Flubaroo will show which questions were answered correctly ("1" point"), which incorrectly ("0" points), and which were not graded. If less than 60% of students got a question correct, the question will be highlighted in orange to alert you. Additionally, students who scored less than 70% on the assignment will be highlighted in red. The Flubaroo menu will now offer you the ability to email each student their grades, view a summary report, or regrade the assignment. If you choose to email each student their grade, you'll be given the option to include an answer key in the email. Choosing "View Report" shows you a summary report of the grading. Want to try it out?

Prelinger Archives : Free Movies : Free Download, Borrow and Streaming : Internet Archive Prelinger Archives by Castle Films movies eye favorite 134 comment 13 Complete presentation of the banana industry from the clearing of the jungle and the planting to the shipment of the fruit to the American markets. favoritefavoritefavoritefavorite ( 13 reviews ) Topics: Agriculture: Bananas, Central America by Handy (Jam) Organization favorite 22 comment 2 Epic history of industrial medicine in the first half of the 20th century, showing how manufacturers and the medical profession came to terms with one another and culminating in GM's rehabilitation program for returned World War II veterans. by Centron Corporation favorite 73 comment 8 Young girl's mirror image teaches her fundamentals of good posture. favoritefavoritefavorite ( 8 reviews ) Topic: Health and hygiene by Unknown favorite 39 comment 7 Promotional film for "Nutrilite," a 1950s-vintage food supplement. favoritefavoritefavoritefavoritefavorite ( 7 reviews ) Topics: Agriculture: Food industry: Supplements, Nutrition favorite 71 comment 3

Le Web à la puissance 2 On ne présente plus vraiment Tim O’Reilly et John Battelle. Tim O’Reilly, des éditions O’Reilly, est devenu l’un des gourous incontournables du web. Initiateur – et promoteur – de la notion de Web 2.0 (voir notre traduction), il demeure l’un des plus fins observateurs du changement technologique. John Battelle, journaliste, auteur de La révolution Google est quant à lui l’un des spécialistes des moteurs de recherche. Il y a cinq ans, nous lancions une conférence sur une idée simple, qui est devenue un mouvement. Dans notre programme initial, nous nous demandions pourquoi certaines entreprises avaient survécu à cette bulle, tandis que d’autres avaient échoué si lamentablement. De Google et Amazon à Wikipedia, eBay et Craiglist, nous constations que le logiciel jouait un rôle facilitateur, mais que la valeur était créée par et pour la communauté des utilisateurs. Il est tout cela, et plus encore. Redéfinir l’intelligence collective : une nouvelle participation sensorielle ____________1.

Sinatra Book [nytlabs] 80+ Google Forms for the Classroom If you're new here, you may want to subscribe to my weekly newsletter. Thanks for visiting! Google Forms is a great tool for the classroom and this post from 2008 has always proven popular on my blog. I hope you continue to be inspired by the ideas here. I have created example forms for each of the different topics, follow the links in each of the ten sections. 1 ) Get to know your class Use this form to gather some indication from your new class about their likes and dislikes, their favourite lessons or after school clubs they enjoy. 2 ) Emotion graph An emotion graph is a simple line graph comparing a range of happiness to sadness against different points (time) in a story or film. Use a Google Form to gather the children’s responses to different parts of any type of linear narrative, written or visual. 3 ) Spelling test Steve Kirkpatrick had this brainwave a while back so check out his excellent post for more information about setting up the spreadsheet. 4 ) Comprehension questions

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