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Zecharia Sitchin

Zecharia Sitchin
"Nibiru (hypothetical planet)" redirects here. For the "Nibiru" doomsday theory, see Nibiru cataclysm. Zecharia Sitchin (Russian: Заха́рия Си́тчин; Azerbaijani: Zaxariya Sitçin) (July 11, 1920 – October 9, 2010)[1] was an Azerbaijani-born American author of books proposing an explanation for human origins involving ancient astronauts. Sitchin attributes the creation of the ancient Sumerian culture to the Anunnaki, which he states was a race of extraterrestrials from a planet beyond Neptune called Nibiru. He believed this hypothetical planet of Nibiru to be in an elongated, elliptical orbit in the Earth's own Solar System, asserting that Sumerian mythology reflects this view. Sitchin's books have sold millions of copies worldwide and have been translated into more than 25 languages. Sitchin's ideas have been rejected by scientists and academics, who dismiss his work as pseudoscience and pseudohistory. Early life[edit] Ideas and works[edit] Influence[edit] Criticisms[edit] Bibliography[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zecharia_Sitchin

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Nibiru cataclysm V838 Mon, a star with an expanding light echo, purported as photographic evidence of Nibiru The Nibiru cataclysm is a supposed disastrous encounter between the Earth and a large planetary object (either a collision or a near-miss) which certain groups believe will take place in the early 21st century. Believers in this doomsday event usually refer to this object as Planet X or Nibiru. Prostitutes of 1912 These pictures, taken in 1912, show the prostitutes of New Orleans. It goes a long way to show how the standards of what is supposed to be provacative has changed in the last century. New Atlantis New Atlantis is a utopian novel by Sir Francis Bacon, published in Latin (as Nova Atlantis) in 1624 and in English in 1627. In this work, Bacon portrayed a vision of the future of human discovery and knowledge, expressing his aspirations and ideals for humankind. The novel depicts the creation of a utopian land where "generosity and enlightenment, dignity and splendour, piety and public spirit" are the commonly held qualities of the inhabitants of the mythical Bensalem. The plan and organisation of his ideal college, Salomon's House (or Solomon's House), envisioned the modern research university in both applied and pure sciences.

A closer look at the 'Cauldrons' in the Valley of Death Siberia This weeks Ancient Aliens episode on Evil Places was highly interesting, particularly the feature on 'Cauldrons' in the Valley of Death, Yakutian Siberia. The Cauldrons have a long history with reports on them going back hundreds of years. The Cauldrons in the Valley of Death Siberia on Ancient Aliens 2011, incase you missed it: Ötzi's flint: A one-sided relationship - Article created on Sunday, February 2, 2014 Dipl.Geol.Univ. Alexander Binsteiner examined in his thesis the chert deposit of Baierdorf at Ried castle in Altmühltal. Voynich manuscript The Voynich manuscript is an illustrated codex hand-written in an unknown writing system. The vellum on which it is written has been carbon-dated to the early 15th century (1404–1438), and may have been composed in Northern Italy during the Italian Renaissance.[1][2] The manuscript is named after Wilfrid Voynich, a Polish book dealer who purchased it in 1912.[3] Some of the pages are missing, but about 240 remain. The text is written from left to right, and most of the pages have illustrations or diagrams. The Voynich manuscript has been studied by many professional and amateur cryptographers, including American and British codebreakers from both World War I and World War II.[4] No one has yet succeeded in deciphering the text, and it has become a famous case in the history of cryptography. The mystery of the meaning and origin of the manuscript has excited the popular imagination, making the manuscript the subject of novels and speculation.

Erich von Däniken Erich Anton Paul von Däniken (/ˈɛrɨk fɒn ˈdɛnɨkɨn/; German: [ˈeːʁɪç fɔn ˈdɛːnɪkən]; born 14 April 1935) is a Swiss author of several books which make controversial claims about extraterrestrial influences on early human culture, including the best-selling Chariots of the Gods?, published in 1968. Von Däniken is one of the main figures responsible for popularizing the "paleo-contact" and ancient astronauts hypotheses. The ideas put forth in his books are largely rejected by scientists and academics, who categorize his work as pseudohistory and pseudoarchaeology.[1][2][3] Von Däniken wrote his first book while working as manager of the Hotel Rosenhügel in Davos, Switzerland. He was convicted of several financial crimes, including fraud, shortly after its publication.[4] The revenue from the sales of his book allowed him to repay his debts and leave the hotel business.

Neatorama The following is an article from The Annals of Improbable Research. These Russian scientists may all have contributed to one research paper. by Arne Lundberg, Department of Orthopaedics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Ana Aguilera, Centre of Analysis, Treatment and Data Modelling, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Carabobo, Valencia, Venezuela; Aurelio Cappozzo, Department of Human Movement and Sport Sciences, University of Rome "Foro Italico," Italy; Benjamin Michaud1, Department of Kinesiology, University of Montreal, Canada; José Garrido Yañez, Grenoble INP-Pagora, Grenoble, France; Chris T.M. (1. Codex Seraphinianus Codex Seraphinianus, originally published in 1981, is an illustrated encyclopedia of an imaginary world, created by the Italian artist, architect, and industrial designer Luigi Serafini during thirty months, from 1976 to 1978.[1] The book is approximately 360 pages long (depending on edition), and written in a strange, generally unintelligible alphabet. Originally published in Italy, the book has since been released in several countries.[2] The Latin noun codex referred to a book with pages (as opposed to a scroll), and is often applied in modern usage to a manuscript with pages, especially an antiquarian one.[3] Seraphinianus is a Latinisation of the author's surname, Serafini (which in Italian, refers to the seraphs). The title Codex Seraphinianus may thus be understood as "the book (or manuscript) of Serafini".[4]

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