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Teacher Blogs

Teacher Blogs
February 21, 2017 - In the Classroom+ In the Classroom (7) Curriculum Matters Writers Liana Loewus and Jaclyn Zubrzycki explore teaching and learning across the subject areas. Prove It: Math and Education Policy High School math teacher John Troutman McCrann writes about his quest to integrate inquiry- and performance-based learning into his instruction, and how these concepts might inform education policy. Teaching for the Whole Story New York City language arts teacher Ariel Sacks shares stories, reflections, and practices for cultivating a student-centered, literature-based classroom in today's education climate. Work in Progress Journalism teacher Starr Sackstein discusses how to guide students into taking charge of their learning and their writing. - Teaching Profession+ Teaching Profession (8) The Art of Coaching Teachers Elena Aguilar offers resources, tips, and suggestions for school instructional coaches and teacher mentors. Learning Forward's PD Watch Teacher Beat Teacher in a Strange Land

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The Banned Books We Love Every year during Banned Books Week, libraries around the country take the opportunity to acknowledge that censorship is still a problem in the United States. From the American Library Association: By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship.... While books have been and continue to be banned, part of the Banned Books Week celebration is the fact that, in a majority of cases, the books have remained available. This happens only thanks to the efforts of librarians, teachers, students, and community members who stand up and speak out for the freedom to read. What better way to celebrate that hard-won freedom than to read a few banned and challenged books?

Mortarboard blog Domestic violence can happen to anyone, including students, writes a blogger. Photograph: Garry Weaser People don't think that domestic violence happens to students but it does, and lad culture is making it worse, writes a student blogger 8 Modern YA Novels to Pair With Classroom Classics The school year is winding down, which means that teens (young people of any age, really) can finally give the classics a rest and dive instead into the young adult novels that really reflect what it’s like to grow up today. Not so fast, though: Lots of YA books, for all their fantastical plot elements and contemporary detail (in at least one of these novels, witches and iPods are never far apart), address some of the same themes the classics do, including race, female sexuality, mental illness, and obviously enough, love. In honor of the classics, YA, and the joy of reading of both together, we’ve rounded up eight of the most-taught books in America and paired them with contemporary reads that tread the same, timeless territory. Classic: Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

Top 100 Education Blogs Education blogs are becoming a means for educators, students, and education administrators to interact more effectively than ever before. They are also a great resource for those searching for the best online education programs to jumpstart their teaching careers. Technorati currently tracks 63.1 million blogs. Edublogs - education blogs for teachers, students and institutions Edublogs.org is a site specifically for teachers, students, librarians, researchers, professors, administrators, corporate trainers and anyone else involved in education. The following terms and conditions govern all use of the Edublogs.org website and all content, services and products available at or through the website, including, but not limited to, Edublogs Campus sites, and Edublogs.tv. The Website is owned and operated by Edublogs.org. (“Edublogs”). The Website is offered subject to your acceptance without modification of all of the terms and conditions contained herein and all other operating rules, policies and procedures that may be published from time to time on this Site by Edublogs (collectively, the “Agreement”).

7 Ways Video Games Will Help Your Kids in School The first video games were not designed with education in mind. Pong, Mario Brothers, Sonic the Hedgehog and Street Fighter didn’t help anyone learn algebra, practice vocabulary, or memorize details of Ancient Roman history, but they were fun. Because of their entertaining nature, video games developed a bad rap over the years for “rotting kids’ brains” or distracting them from more studious pursuits.

How Blogs Work" Blogs appear on the news pretty often these days. For example, a reporter is tipped to a story by a blog, or a blog reports another angle on a story. Blogs show up in magazines a lot, too. But there is a good chance you have never seen a blog (also known as a weblog) or experienced the blogosphere. What are blogs? 7 Ways Teachers Can Create Videos without Installing any Software 1- Wevideo WeVideo is a collaborative, cloud-based online video editor that is free to use, with affordable options to export in HD and store additional videos 2- Google Story Builder This Story Builder allows you to create mini-movies or video stories with the feel of Google Docs. You can also personalize the videos you create using the characters, story, and even music of your choosing and when you finish you can share your final product with others. 3- Pixorial Rather than spending valuable classroom time learning a complicated video editing program, you and your students can now get straight to the project.

Blog A blog (a truncation of the expression weblog)[1] is a discussion or informational site published on the World Wide Web and consisting of discrete entries ("posts") typically displayed in reverse chronological order (the most recent post appears first). Until 2009, blogs were usually the work of a single individual[citation needed], occasionally of a small group, and often covered a single subject. More recently "multi-author blogs" (MABs) have developed, with posts written by large numbers of authors and professionally edited. MABs from newspapers, other media outlets, universities, think tanks, advocacy groups and similar institutions account for an increasing quantity of blog traffic.

The Teacher’s Guide to Using YouTube in the Classroom YouTube is one of the most popular websites on the planet and a vast resource for educational content. The site is home to over 10 million videos tagged as educational, many of them submitted by your fellow teachers. A completely free resource this huge and varied has nearly endless potential for the classroom. Here are some ideas and suggestions to get you started.

Blogs making their impact felt The impact of blogging has reached a tipping point, argues Julian Smith, senior analyst at Jupiter Research. Anyone studying the media over the last few months might have noticed a sudden increase in concern about the growth of consumer-created content and the impact of blogging on business. In December 2005, a white paper on the influence of bloggers on corporate reputation by Market Sentinel, Onalytica and Immediate Future highlighted the negative impact one individual, Jeff Jarvis, could have on a brand's reputation, in this case Dell, through angry blog postings about his bad customer experience. In April this year, Custom Communications laid on a first of its kind event on Blogging4Business to discuss how this burgeoning micro-publishing practice can potentially damage a brand. In May, traditional news producers, aggregators and distributors gathered at the We Media global forum to debate the future of news in light of the growth of blogging and citizen journalism. Two-way channel

12 Easy Ways to Use Technology in the Classroom, Even for Technophobic Teachers Everyone wants teachers to use technology in the classroom. But you're busy -- meeting standards, prepping students for tests -- and maybe you’re not too fond of computers, anyway. Never fear – there are easy ways to bring your classroom up-to-date, technologically. Do you have a iPad in your classroom for your use?

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