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How to Build an Earthbag Roundhouse

How to Build an Earthbag Roundhouse
Note: If you’re new to earthbag building, please read the introductory Step-by-Step Earthbag Building Instructable first. Also, my new Earthbag Building Guide and Earthbag Building DVD are now available. Stay up-to-date on all the latest earthbag news by following our Natural Building Blog. We built this earthbag roundhouse in 2010 as part of an earthbag workshop in Thailand, and finished it later that summer. The other key advantage of earthbag is cost. Basic project information: 18’ exterior diameter; 15’ interior diameter; 177 sq. ft. interior floor space; total cost of materials: $2,045, which is about $11.50/square foot The following instructions assume you have cleared and leveled the site, removed topsoil, positioned fill soil around the building site to minimize work, dug a trench to stable subsoil, buried any utilities, put about 12” of gravel in the trench, and added a center pole with stringline to measure the radius. Related:  Earthbag Building

How to Build an Insulated Earthbag House For those new to earthbag building, please read my Step-by-Step Earthbag Building Instructable . Also, my new Earthbag Building Guide and Earthbag Building DVD are now available. Energy performance on most buildings can be improved with insulation, including those made of earth such as adobe and earthbag structures. Most earthbag buildings use polypropylene grain bags or mesh bags filled with soil. Unlike other earth building methods, earthbag building has the unique advantage of providing either thermal mass or insulation, and therefore can be adapted for cold climates with an insulated fill material. The table below compares the approximate R-values of five low cost insulating materials that could be used in earthbags. Tools and supplies: Shovel, bucket, garden hose, tamper, slider, gravel, soil and/or insulation, earthbags (poly sand bags), barbed wire, wire cutters, level The following pages discuss four low cost methods of building insulated earthbag houses.

How to build an Awesome Sidewalk with recycled lumber for only $50.00 After reading that title you might wonder, why would anyone make a sidewalk out of wood? Well, there are a few very good reasons for doing it. A little history More than 25 years ago my wood sidewalk started out as an experiment to see how practical it might be. My challenges for this project were: Come up with a design that could use all the different sizes of redwood I salvaged without producing a lot of waste. Resurface the older weathered wood so it matched with everything. Create a good-looking, practical sidewalk at a reasonable cost. By the way, I have included a lot of comments and extra info in the pictures so be sure to check any yellow outlined squares in them.

How to Build an Earthbag Dome Note: If you’re new to earthbag building, first read the introductory Step-by-Step Earthbag Building Instructable and How to Build an Earthbag Roundhouse . Also, my new Earthbag Building Guide and Earthbag Building DVD are now available. We built this earthbag dome at our home in Thailand for Mother Earth News Magazine in 2007. The article that describes the complete building process in detail was published August/September 2009. This earthbag dome Instructable simplifies the process and illustrates each step of construction with photos. This multi-purpose dome can serve as a storage shed or cool pantry above ground, or as a rootcellar or storm shelter below ground. Earthbag structures provide a cool space in summer and an escape from the cold in winter (ideal for humans and animals), which means this earthbag dome is well suited for many purposes, like a quiet space for relaxing or playing music, as well as those listed previously.

ShopBotTools CNC Routers Step-by-Step Earthbag Building This Instructable explains each main step of construction for building vertical earthbag walls. Videos on my Earthbag Natural Building YouTube channel demonstrate the process. For those who don’t know, earthbag building uses polypropylene rice bags or feed bags filled with soil or insulation that are stacked like masonry and tamped flat. Barbed wire between courses keeps bags from slipping and adds tensile strength. The final plastered walls look just like adobe structures. Thousands of people are now building with bags to create their dream homes, home offices, shops, resorts, rootcellars, storm cellars and survival shelters. I got involved with earthbag building when the Indian Ocean tsunami hit Southeast Asia in December, 2004. Our websites at EarthbagBuilding.com and Earthbag Building Blog explain just about everything you need to know for free.

diy When I was in China last summer, I remember noticing that most girls had ponytails tied with a scrunchie with bunny ears. I could never pull this off, but thought it was adorable, and kept it in mind for an Easter DIY. It's a great way to use fabric scraps, a simple accessory to wear at an Easter party, and a sweet Easter gift for a little girl. Okay, on to the DIY! Supplies needed:Fabric, about 1/8 yardFabric glue (or a sewing machine if you prefer to sew)Elastic (I used the 0.25 wide one), about 9"ScissorsPencilSafety pin Start by cutting a 18" x 3" piece of fabric. On the right side of the fabric, apply fabric glue all along the top edge (on the longest side), trying to distribute the glue evenly. Fold (wrong side facing out), press firmly along the edge (where you just applied glue), and let the glue dry for about half an hour. Once the glue has dried, turn the tube inside out. Cut a 9" piece of elastic, and attach a safety pin at one end. Cut a 12" x 5" piece of fabric.

Low-Cost Multipurpose Earthbag Building - DIY Related Content Earth Building in Thailand I had heard there are thousands of new earthen houses in Thailand. That really amazed me, so I set o... One of the most practical structures on a small farmstead is a multipurpose building that can serve as a storage shed or cool pantry above ground, or as a root cellar or storm shelter below ground. In many cases, no building permit will be needed for this little building, because it’s below the minimum size required by most building codes (for structures that are not inhabited and not attached to a residence). Earthbag structures provide a cool space in summer and an escape from the cold in winter, which means this earthbag dome is well suited for many purposes. The earthbag dome has a natural look and blends in with the land. Building With Earthbags The cost of building with earthbags varies. The most significant advantage to building with bags is the simplicity of the process. Construction Cost Free or Low-cost Items: Tools Basic Information

Earthbag & Papercrete Home: Hart House This is our first experimental earthbag dome. The interior diameter is 14 feet and the dome stands about 16 feet high. At first we tried filling the bags with the fine sand that it is built upon, but when we were partly done, the dome fell in because the sand couldn't hold the shape. Then we filled the bags with crushed volcanic rock (scoria) that provides better insulation and holds its shape much better. The arch over the doorway was created with a wooden form that was later removed. Here is the same dome as above, with joists in place for the loft and with the arch form still supporting the entrance arch. This is the beginning of the large elliptical dome that became our kitchen and living room. Because of the elliptical shape, this dome required a rigid pole framework to help support the second story. Here I am applying a coating of papercrete to the outside of the large dome. This is the papercrete tow mixer that was used to mix most of the papercrete.

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