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Hindu mythology

Hindu mythology
Hindu mythology is a large body of traditional narratives related to Hinduism as contained in Sanskrit literature (such as the epics like Mahabharata and Ramayana, the Puranas, and the Vedas), Ancient Tamil literature (such as the Sangam literature and Periya Puranam), several other works, most notably the Bhagavata Purana, claiming the status of a Fifth Veda and other religious regional literature of South Asia. As such, it is a subset of Indian and Nepali culture. Rather than one consistent, monolithic structure, it is a range of diverse traditions, developed by different sects, people and philosophical schools, in different regions and at different times, which are not necessarily held by all Hindus to be literal accounts of historical events, but are taken to have deeper, often symbolic, meaning, and which have been given a complex range of interpretations.[1] Sources[edit] Vedas[edit] Itihasa and Puranas[edit] The epics themselves are set in different Yugas, or periods of time. Related:  Arabian, Hindi & Persian (pre Iraq & Iran)Hinduism

Persian mythology Persian mythology are traditional tales and stories of ancient origin, all involving extraordinary or supernatural beings. Drawn from the legendary past of Iran, they reflect the attitudes of the society to which they first belonged - attitudes towards the confrontation of good and evil, the actions of the gods, yazats (lesser gods), and the exploits of heroes and fabulous creatures. Myths play a crucial part in Iranian culture and our understanding of them is increased when we consider them within the context of Iranian history. For this purpose we must ignore modern political boundaries and look at historical developments in the Greater Iran, a vast area covering parts of Central Asia well beyond the frontiers of present-day Iran. Key texts[edit] The central collection of Persian mythology is the Shahnameh of Ferdowsi, written over a thousand years ago. Religious background[edit] The characters of Persian mythology almost always fall into one of two camps. Good and Evil[edit]

Hinduism Hinduism is the dominant religion, or way of life,[note 1] in South Asia, most notably India. It includes Shaivism, Vaishnavism and Shaktism among numerous other traditions, and a wide spectrum of laws and prescriptions of "daily morality" based on karma, dharma, and societal norms. Hinduism is a categorisation of distinct intellectual or philosophical points of view, rather than a rigid, common set of beliefs. Hinduism, with about one billion followers[web 1] is the world's third largest religion, after Christianity and Islam. Hinduism has been called the "oldest religion" in the world,[note 2] and some practitioners refer to it as Sanātana Dharma, "the eternal law" or the "eternal way"[3] beyond human origins. Etymology The word Hindu is derived (through Persian) from the Indo-Aryan/Sanskrit word Sindhu, the Indo-Aryan name for the Indus River in the northwestern part of the Indian subcontinent (modern day Pakistan and Northern India). Definitions Colonial influences Sanātana Dharma Moksha

Vedic mythology Vedic mythology refers to the mythological aspects of the historical Vedic religion and Vedic literature, alluded to in the hymns of the Rigveda. The central myth at the base of Vedic ritual surrounds Indra who, inebriated with Soma, slays the dragon (ahi) Vrtra, freeing the rivers, the cows and Dawn. It has directly[dubious ] contributed to the evolution and development of later Hinduism and Hindu mythology. Vedic mythology[edit] The Vedas in Puranic mythology[edit] The Vishnu Purana attributes the current arrangement of four Vedas to the mythical sage Vedavyasa.[2] Puranic tradition also postulates a single original Veda that, in varying accounts, was divided into three or four parts. Rig, Sama, Yajur and Atharva constitute the "Four Vedas".[3] The Rig Veda (mantras) is a collection of inspired songs or hymns and is a main source of information on the Rig Vedic civilization. See also[edit] References[edit] Further reading[edit] Buitenen, J.

33 Devas May Varuna with guidance straight, And Mitra the One-who-knows, And Aryaman in accord with Aditya, Guide us forth, like the wind that blows,As with their Might Evermore They guard the Sacred Laws, Shelter may they vouchsafe to us, Immortal Gods to mortal men.. The Vedic Seers of ancient India knew that mere words could not capture the essence of the Supreme Reality. However, they did not give up trying, and shared their visions as hymns dedicated to the various sentient beings guarding the natural and supernatural phenomena around them. These guardians of the Three Lokas were referred to as Devas (Sanskrit root 'Div' meaning the 'Shining One'). The effulgent Devas The derived term 'Deus' or 'Dios' from the same root, is still used to refer to God in modern European languages and even in the New Testament of Bible. The Brihadaranyaka Upanishad in fact has a clear discussion between a rishi Vidagdha and the foremost authority of those times Rishi Yagnavalkya. The 33 Gods Indra with the Vasus

Arabian mythology Arabian mythology is the ancient, pre-Islamic beliefs of the Arab people. Prior to Islam the Kaaba of Mecca was covered in symbols representing the myriad demons, djinn, demigods, or simply tribal gods and other assorted deities which represented the polytheistic culture of pre-Islamic Arabia. It has been inferred from this plurality an exceptionally broad context in which mythology could flourish.[1] Many of the physical descriptions of the pre-Islamic gods are traced to idols, especially near the Kaaba, which is asserted to have contained up to 360.[1] Gods[edit] The main god in the Arabian peninsula was Hubal (Arabic: هبل‎), who is regarded as the most notable and chief of the gods. The three daughters of Hubal, and chief goddesses of Meccan Arabian mythology, were Al-lāt, Al-‘Uzzá, and Manāt. Other notable gods Supernatural beings[edit] Spirits[edit] Jinn (also called djinn or genies, Arabic: جن‎ jinn) are supernatural creatures which possess free will, and can be either good or evil.

A Brief Introduction to Hinduism Would you like to make this site your homepage? It's fast and easy... Yes, Please make this my home page! Don't show this to me again. Table of Contents: Introduction Disclaimer National Anthem Chapter 1 The Beginning The Foundations of Hinduism Chapter 2 The Basic Scriptures of Hinduism The Philosophical Systems of Hinduism Ethical and Moral Principles of Hinduism Chapter 3 Myths and Facts in Hinduism Chapter 4 Hindu Society Hindu Sadhanas Chapter 5 Rituals, Temples and Festivals in Hinduism Rituals and Sacraments of Hinduism Chapter 6 Reform Movements in Hinduism Chapter 7 Popularized Notions in Hinduism Literature Central to the Indian Culture Ramayana Mahabharata Appendices The Cycle of Life Hinduism as per History Hindu Scriptures World Religions Gods of Hinduism Indian National Anthem Jana-gana-mana-adhinayaka, jaya he Bharata-bhagya-vidhata Punjab-sindhu-gujarata-maratha- Dravida-utkala-banga Vindhya-himachala-yamuna-ganga Ucchhala-jaladhi taranga Tava subha name jaage Tava subha ashisha maange Gaahe tava jaya gaatha.

ATLANTEAN GARDENS: Golden Woman: Ancient Scythian Princess of Kazakhstan Archaeologists in Kazakhstan have recreated the impressive attire of an ancient Scythian princess from fragments discovered in a treasure-filled burial discovered two years ago in the Terekty district of Western Kazakhstan. They have also placed on display the unique golden artifacts found in the grave of the princess, who has been dubbed ‘Golden Woman’. Dating back 2,500 years, it is the oldest golden burial to have been unearthed in the country. The 'Golden Woman' was found buried in a mound, known as a kurgan, alongside numerous gold and silver vessels, makeup kits, golden jewelry, a headdress, a horse bridle, and other household items that were considered essential for the afterlife. The features of her burial are characteristic of Zoroastrianism, an ancient Iranian religion and Aryan philosophy, which spread eastward towards Kazakhstan. One artifact that was of particular importance was a wooden comb depicting a battle scene in the war of the Saks against the Persians.

Hinduism & Sanatana Dharma | भारतवषॅ Hindusim means Sanatana Dharma. Hinduism was coined by outsiders, and it means who do not practice Islam, Zohrastrian, Christianity or Judaism, and practised by the people who live in geographical region of Hindu {land between Himkhand (Himalaya) and Indu Samudra (Indian Ocean) - MahaShivpurana, Rudrasamhita-Yuddhakhanda}. Is it a religion or a way of life? I believe it is both. It is based on “Puranik” scriptures of Vedic culture. Veda is science. There are many misconceptions about Hinduism. People in ancient Bhaaratvarsha used to follow Sanatana Dharma. There are three cycles of time: (a) The smallest one is called chaturyugi and it is of 4.32 million years, (b) the second bigger one is called manvantar and it is of (4.32×1,000) ÷ 14million years, and (c) the third one is of 4,320 million years. HINDUISM: Extract from ‘Hinduism is the source of civilisation’ [2] & ‘Hinduism’ [3] Hinduism is the world’s most liberal and tolerant religion. Hinduism is not a man-made religion. Like this:

ATLANTEAN GARDENS: History of the Medes: Magi and Enchanters of Old The Medes were a people of Indo-Iranian (Aryan) origin who inhabited the western and north-western portion of present-day Iran. By the 6th century BC (prior to the Persian invasion) the Medes were able to establish an empire that stretched from Aran (the modern-day Republic of Azerbaijan) to Central Asia and Afghanistan. Today's population of the western part of the Iranian Plateau (including many Persian-speakers, Kurds and Azeris) consider themselves to be descended from the ancient Medes. Apart from a few personal names, the original Aryan language of the Medes is almost entirely unknown. The Six Median Tribes Herodotus lists the names of six Mede tribes or castes. The Busae group is thought to derive from the Persian term buza meaning indigenous (i.e. not Iranian). Early historical references to Medes The origin and history of the Medes is quite obscure, as we possess almost no contemporary information, and not a single monument or inscription from Media itself.

Kalki In Hinduism, Kalki (Devanagari: कल्कि; meaning 'Eternity,' 'White Horse,' or 'Destroyer of Filth') is the final incarnation of Vishnu in the current Mahayuga, foretold to appear at the end of Kali Yuga, the current epoch. Religious texts called the Puranas foretell that Kalki will be atop a white horse with a drawn blazing sword. He is the harbinger of the end time in Hindu eschatology, after which he will usher in Satya Yuga. In Buddhist Kalachakra tradition, 25 rulers of the Shambhala Kingdom held the title of Kalki, Kulika or Kalki-king.[3] During Vaishakha, the first fortnight in Shukla Paksha is dedicated to fifteen deities, with each day for a different god. In this tradition, the twelfth day is Vaishakha Dwadashi and is dedicated to Madhava, another name for Kalki. Maha Avatara[edit] There are numerous interpretations of Vedic tradition. Puranas[edit] Birth[edit] As written in the Kalki Purana: Literal translation: शम्भल ग्राम मुख्यस्य ब्राह्मणस्य महात्मनः। The Bhagavata Purana states

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