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Columbia University Libraries

Columbia University Libraries

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8 digital life skills all children need – and a plan for teaching them A generation ago, IT and digital media were niche skills. Today, they are a core competency necessary to succeed in most careers. That’s why digital skills are an essential part of a comprehensive education framework. Without a national digital education programme, command of and access to technology will be distributed unevenly, exacerbating inequality and hindering socio-economic mobility. What’s your DQ? The challenge for educators is to move beyond thinking of IT as a tool, or “IT-enabled education platforms”. A Design Thinking approach to Digital Citizenship Design Thinking is a problem solving methodology used by people all over the world to come up with new ideas. Recently there has been a lot of discussion about how to integrate this approach into education. This summer I took two Online courses to learn more about the process. I am very interested in ways to use this approach in my own teaching. This fall I decided to apply this approach to my 7th grade Digital Citizenship unit which focuses on cyberbullying.

ALA: Copyright The Digital Age presents new challenges to fundamental copyright doctrines that are legal cornerstones of library services. Libraries are leaders in trying to maintain a balance of power between copyright holders and users, in keeping with the fundamental principles outlined in the Constitution and carefully crafted over the past 200 years. In this role, we closely follow both federal and state legislation and make our voices heard when our issues are moving.

Welcome, Educators — ikeepsafe.org Administrators and teachers are urgently looking for a proven system that will guide them through the complexities of Web 2.0. Too often, events like cyberbullying, sexting, plagiarizing and hacking push litigious chaos into the forefront of technology adoption, essentially stunting the development of digital citizenship progress. In response to this real and palpable need, iKeepSafe offers you these resources: Dive Into Data Privacy and Security • Student Privacy Professional Development Courses for K12 Educators: Training for teachers, employees, administrators, and school board members to ensure technology innovation and learning goals are balanced with privacy and security responsibilities. • The e-Safety Committee Privacy Lead Objectives Guide: sequences three steps that the privacy leader of an educational agency must take to properly protect student information. Engage Your Whole School Community

Duke University School of Law Public Domain Day: January 1, 2017 Public Domain Day is January 1st of every year. If you live in Canada, January 1st 2017 would be the day when the works of Evelyn Waugh, C.S. Forester, and André Breton enter the public domain. Digital Citizenship Poster for Elementary Classrooms Turn wired students into great digital citizens Get all the tools you need with Common Sense Education's FREE Digital Literacy and Citizenship Curriculum and Connecting Families Program. The relevant, ready-to-use instruction helps you guide students to make safe, smart, and ethical decisions in the digital world where they live, study, and play. Turning Students into Good Digital Citizens Via The Journal Schools have always been charged with the task of producing good citizens. But how has our definition of a “good citizen” changed over the ages? Video Exclusive: Cultural anthropologist Michael Wesch at Kansas State University discusses the tools today’s students need to be good digital citizens. In today’s world of near-ubiquitous connectivity, in which ordinary people have almost instantaneous access to unlimited stores of information and the ability to interact with anyone, anywhere, anytime, what does it mean to be an effective citizen? What skills and knowledge do our students need to participate fully in a world transformed by technology?

Common Sense Digital Citizenship: Certified Educator "I'm inspired to teach digital citizenship and become a Common Sense Digital Citizenship Certified Educator because I see the excitement, engagement, and passion from my students when using technology in a way that is safe and enhances their individual learning experiences." Nicole Swick, Common Sense Certified Educator, CICS West Belden Charter School, Ill. Being a Common Sense Certified Educator is an official stamp of recognition from Common Sense. The "New and Improved" Digital Citizenship Survival Kit I have been thinking about some "new" items I could add to my original Digital Citizenship Kit that I created last year. Like I said in that blog post, I love using props when teaching. After some great conversations with the good wife @jenbadura on what I should include, I have come up with some new items to include in the survival kit. Yes, you can use this with your students! After I blogged about the original kit, I had a plethora of teachers email me or send me a tweet me asking if it was okay to use this idea at their school. Please do!

Reframing the Debate About Screen Time At the end of 2016, I found myself mentally exhausted and barely able to string together a coherent thought or formulate an original idea. As I swiped through my social media feeds for inspiration—or maybe procrastination—a nagging feeling hit. I needed a break from screen time. Pediatricians, psychologists, and neuroscientists warn of potential negative consequences associated with constant mental stimulation as a result of interacting with our devices. Without a screen-free space for my brain to relax, stop firing, and just think, I felt incapable of significant mental processing.

Identifying Fake News: An Infographic and Educator Resources - EasyBib Blog We recently posted, “10 Ways to Spot a Fake News Article,” which highlighted key items to look for on a website when determining its credibility. The infographic found here summarizes the content from the blog post and students can use it as a guide when using news sources in research. Post, print, or share it with your students or others! Looking for other resources related to website credibility? We’ve listed some of our favorites below the infographic! Channel One News: Lesson Plan: How to Spot Fake News 15 Lesson Plans For Making Students Better Online Researchers via Edudemic Google is usually one of the first places students turn to when tasked with an assignment. Whether it’s for research, real-time results, or just a little digital exploration … it’s important they know how to properly Google. Lucky for teachers (and students, of course), Google has a handy set of lesson plans that are just waiting to be unleashed upon the leaders of tomorrow. While I understand there’s a LOT more to research than just Googling, it’s important to note that this is where nearly all students start their research. Therefore, it’s a critical skill if they’re going to start down the right paths.

From Gutenberg to Zuckerberg in 14 Lessons The full News Literacy course, developed at Stony Brook University, organizes the material into 8 concepts that are spread amongst our 14 week course that take students from the first information revolution of Johannes Gutenberg's printing press to the Digital Age of Mark Zuckerberg's Facebook. Each lesson stands alone or can easily be integrated into your program. Below, find a summary of each of those lessons, and a link to the most updated version of the teaching materials for each from our professors at Stony Brook University. Each of the following Course Packs include PowerPoint presentations, associated media, lecture notes, and recitation materials. Our course structure changed in the Fall 2015 semester. The changes are outlined in our updated syllabus from that semester.

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