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Tilt-shift nhiếp ảnh - Wikipedia tiếng Việt

Tilt-shift nhiếp ảnh - Wikipedia tiếng Việt
Tilt–shift photography is the use of camera movements on small- and medium-format cameras, and sometimes specifically refers to the use of tilt for selective focus, often for simulating a miniature scene. Sometimes the term is used when the large depth of field is simulated with digital post-processing; the name may derive from a perspective control lens (or tilt–shift lens) normally required when the effect is produced optically. Tilt is used to control the orientation of the plane of focus (PoF), and hence the part of an image that appears sharp; it makes use of the Scheimpflug principle. Shift is used to adjust the position of the subject in the image area without moving the camera back; this is often helpful in avoiding the convergence of parallel lines, as when photographing tall buildings. History and use[edit] Perspective control lenses[edit] The 1961 35 mm f/3.5 PC-Nikkor lens—the first perspective control lens for a 35 mm camera Shape control[edit] Available lenses[edit] Tilt[edit] Related:  lilouaugier

Streets Saturday Features for Week 33 | Brian Q. Webb I spent a chunk of last week in the city of Hualien, located in central Taiwan. That being the case, none of the photos in this week’s series were taken in Taipei. I will be posting more images from out-of-town later on. As always, comments are welcome. Enjoy! Until next time. What are some unique visual techniques used in 'Sherlock' the BBC TV Series? - Quora Engadget Mobile HD Warrior » Blog Archiv » Filming Sherlock with DP Fabian Wagner Q1. When did you start filming video professionally. Professionally I started around 2004, mainly doing music videos. Q2. What was your first camcorder you worked with. The first camcorder I used was for my first short back in Germany, I think it was a Sony something or other, it was in 98, with video zooms. nothing like it is today and I had a couple of super 8 cameras that I was playing around with. Q3. Yes, the DoP should always have a say in what camera to use. the Alexa is the only choice for me right now and everybody else liked it so thats what we went with. Q4. I shot some tests and a music video with it before but nothing long, not a 4 month shoot. Q5. We shot sherlock on 4:2:2 HQ, 25fps, and also did a lot os slow motion, mainly 50 or 60 fps. Q6. My main set was the Cooks S4’s we also used the superspeeds a bit, and a set of uncoated lenses for all the flairs. Q7. Q8. On dramas we always have focus pullers, the Depth of field is so small, you need it and its a very tricky job. Q9.

MirrorlessForum Optical Anomalies and Lens Corrections Explained If you spend much time perusing the Lenses section of the B&H website, or follow along with the latest announcements of new glass, you're likely to run into a range of phrases that are not inherently known to those with less than a keen, honed understanding of photographic and optical geekery. Scientific-sounding words like aspherical elements, chromatic aberration, coma, low dispersion, and high refractive index to the layman often lead to imprecise thoughts regarding how a lens performs or what it does to better image quality. But what exactly does an anomalous partial dispersion element do? And why do you not want spherical aberration? Aberration In its most basic definition, an aberration is something that deviates from the norm, usually in an unwanted way. Chromatic Aberration An example of chromatic aberration, where the red, green, and blue wavelengths do not converge at the same point, causing color fringing. Monochromatic Aberration Corrective Elements Aspherical Element Apochromat

3ds max professional studio lights arri This is a legally binding agreement between licensee ("you"), and TurboSquid regarding your rights to use Stock Media Products from the Site under this license. "You" refers to the purchasing entity, whether that is a natural person who must be at least 18 years of age, or a corporate entity. The rights granted in this agreement are granted to the purchasing entity, its parent company, and its majority owned affiliates on a "royalty free" basis, which means that after a Purchase, there are no future royalties or payments that are required. Collectively, these rights are considered "extended uses", and are granted to you, subject to applicable Editorial Use Restrictions described below. The license granted is wholly transferable to other parties so long it is in force and not terminated, otherwise violated, or extinguished, as set forth herein. Part I: Introduction & Definitions Part II: License Rights Part III: License Term and Termination Part IV: Warranties Part VI: Other Terms I. II. V.

Sensor size explained At the heart of every digital camera is a light-sensitive silicon chip called a sensor. The sensor takes the place of film for recording images. The size of these rectangular chips varies depending on the type of camera. In small compact cameras the sensors are relatively tiny, sometimes no larger than the size of the fingernail on someone's little finger. Above: The full-frame sensor in the Nikon D700 The imperial measurements used to indicate some sensor's sizes are a hangover from the old days of television camera tubes. It can be very confusing to understand and is best explained by a diagram showing the various relative sizes of different types of sensors. Above: The relative size of sensors from the smallest type used in a compact camera all the way up to a full-frame digital SLR Pixels Sensors are packed with up to 24 million light-sensitive points or pixels that can register the amount of light falling on that part of the silicon. Large and small Article continues below

3D max Nikon D80 DSLR This is a legally binding agreement between licensee ("you"), and TurboSquid regarding your rights to use Stock Media Products from the Site under this license. "You" refers to the purchasing entity, whether that is a natural person who must be at least 18 years of age, or a corporate entity. The rights granted in this agreement are granted to the purchasing entity, its parent company, and its majority owned affiliates on a "royalty free" basis, which means that after a Purchase, there are no future royalties or payments that are required. Collectively, these rights are considered "extended uses", and are granted to you, subject to applicable Editorial Use Restrictions described below. Part I: Introduction & Definitions Part II: License Rights Part III: License Term and Termination Part IV: Warranties Part V: Limitation of Liability Part VI: Other Terms I. Some words in this agreement are given specific meanings. "Imagery" is a Creation made of any single image or sequence of images. II. IV.

Why ED, LD, ELD, SLD and ASPH Glass Make a Difference in Your Photographs When shopping for a new lens, sooner or later you’re going to run into the terms “ED” (extra-low dispersion), “LD” (low dispersion), “SLD” (special low dispersion), “ELD” (extraordinary low dispersion), and “ULD” (ultra-low dispersion), and each of these variants represents a standard above the norm when it comes to image quality. The key reason LD, ED, ELD, ULD and SLD glass are important in lens design is because of their ability to reduce levels of chromatic aberration, or color fringing, an optical phenomenon in which the colors that make up the image come into focus at slightly differing planes (similar to the way a prism or rainbow breaks white light into individual color channels) as they strike the surface of your camera’s imaging sensor. The chemical makeup of ED glass compresses the distance between each color’s plane of focus, resulting in greater color saturation, contrast and image detail. common in 300mm and longer lenses.

sony cybershot dsc w80 3d model This is a legally binding agreement between licensee ("you"), and TurboSquid regarding your rights to use Stock Media Products from the Site under this license. "You" refers to the purchasing entity, whether that is a natural person who must be at least 18 years of age, or a corporate entity. The rights granted in this agreement are granted to the purchasing entity, its parent company, and its majority owned affiliates on a "royalty free" basis, which means that after a Purchase, there are no future royalties or payments that are required. Part I: Introduction & Definitions Part II: License Rights Part III: License Term and Termination Part IV: Warranties Part V: Limitation of Liability Part VI: Other Terms I. This agreement is intended to be easy to understand, and to provide clarity for using Stock Media Products in the work you create ("Creations"). Some words in this agreement are given specific meanings. "Imagery" is a Creation made of any single image or sequence of images. II. III. V.

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